Notes

[NI0004] Aunt Ginny states he was 5 years old when his mother died and that he relates a story of being visited by his mother after her death to comfort him as a child

Maine Death Records
http://vitals.rootsweb.com/me/death/search.cgi
Certificate number: 6707778
WOOD GEORGE W
Date of Death: 09-07-1967
Age:71
Place of death: ROCKLAND

[NI0006] Inducted 7/20/1942 - entered active duty 8/4/1942 Camp Blanding Florida through 3/9/1943 Ft Leonard Wood, Missouri Service Serial Number 34243001 Private Hq Det Station Comp #1751. EM request to accept employment in essential industry.

Died at home of myocardial infarction at 435 40th Street, West Palm Beach, FL which is the same address on the birth certificate of Margaret Marquis from Bibb County, Georgia.

Unclear if born in Kansas City Missouri or Kansas

!BIRTH: Letter from great aunt Naomi says the funeral home book lists July 23, 1898; Death Cert. says the same; 1920 FL Soundex, age 21; 1900 Census, KS says Aug 1899, but lists his age as 1 on 17 June. Death certificate says he was single and that he was a WWII vet.

Palm Beach Post, Thursday, August 13, 1953, page 8
Roy Marquis Dies of Heart Attack
Roy Marquis, 63, mechanic for a West Palm Beach washing machine firm died of a heart attack Wednesday at his home, 435 40th St.
The North Side fire station and a doctor were called, but he was pronounced dead after the firemen administered oxygen a half hour.
A veteran of World War II, Mr. Marquis was a member of Palm Beach Lodge 88, IOOF.
He is survived by four borthers, Oliver and William Marquis, of West Palm Beach, James, of Texas, and Benjamin Harrison Marquis, of Springfield, Mo.
Arrangements will be announced by Mizell-Simon-Faville Funeral Home.

Palm Beach Post, Friday, August 14, 1953, page 10
Roy Marquis
Services for Mr. Marquis, 63, mechanic who died of a heart attack Wednesday at his home, 435 40th St., will be conducted by a Christian Science reader at 4 p.m. Saturday in the Mizell-Simon-Faville Funeral Chapel.
Graveside rites in Hillcrest Cemetery will be in charge of Palm Beach Lodge 88, IOOF, of which he was a member. Pallbearers, all fellow-members of the lodge, will be A. L. Curtis, C. E. Frazier, L. S. Collins, W. H. White, S. R. Brothers, P. P. Savage, D. B. Shepard and John Olson.

Funeral Home: Mizell-Simon-Faville Mortuary, Inc., 413 Hibiscus St., West Palm Beach, Fla.

*****

# ID: I11853
# Name: Roy Lee Marquis 1 2
# Sex: M
# Birth: 23 JUL 1898 in Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri 1 2
# Death: 12 AUG 1953 in West Palm Beach, Palm Beach, Florida 1 2 of Heart Attack 1 2
# Burial: 15 AUG 1953 Hillcrest Cemetery, West Palm Beach, Palm Beach, Florida 1 2
# Occupation: mechanic for a West Palm Beach washing machine firm
# Reference Number: MMRR3S
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Vol. 1608 #21151
Title: Death Certificate, State Of Florida
Author: Office Of Vital Statistics, State Board Of Health

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Letter From Naomi Marquis
Author: Naomi Marquis

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED171 Sh12
Date: 17 Jun 1900
Title: 1900 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED202 Sh11
Date: 26 Apr 1910
Title: 1910 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED143 Sh14
Date: 12 Jan 1920
Title: 1920 Census, Palm Beach, Florida
Author: U.S. Government
BIRTH: Letter from great aunt Naomi says the funeral home b ook lists July 23, 1898; Death Cert. says the same; 1920 F L Soundex, age 21; 1900 Census, KS says Aug 1899, but list s his age as 1 on 17 June. Death certificate says he was si ngle and that he was a WWII vet.

Palm Beach Post, Thursday, August 13, 1953, page 8
Roy Marquis Dies of Heart Attack Roy Marquis, 63, mechanic for a West Palm Beach washin g machine firm died of a heart attack Wednesday at his home , 435 40th St. The North Side fire station and a doctor were called , but he was pronounced dead after the firemen administere d oxygen a half hour. A veteran of World War II, Mr. Marquis was a member o f Palm Beach Lodge 88, IOOF. He is survived by four borthers, Oliver and William Ma rquis, of West Palm Beach, James, of Texas, and Benjamin Ha rrison Marquis, of Springfield, Mo. Arrangements will be announced by Mizell-Simon-Favill e Funeral Home.

Palm Beach Post, Friday, August 14, 1953, page 10
Roy Marquis Services for Mr. Marquis, 63, mechanic who died of a h eart attack Wednesday at his home, 435 40th St., will be co nducted by a Christian Science reader at 4 p.m. Saturday i n the Mizell-Simon-Faville Funeral Chapel. Graveside rites in Hillcrest Cemetery will be in charg e of Palm Beach Lodge 88, IOOF, of which he was a member . Pallbearers, all fellow-members of the lodge, will be A . L. Curtis, C. E. Frazier, L. S. Collins, W. H. White, S . R. Brothers, P. P. Savage, D. B. Shepard and John Olson.



Father: Isaac Newton Marquis b: 27 DEC 1853 in Jackson, Missouri
Mother: Cordelia Alice Sherman b: APR 1858 in Madison, Jefferson, Indiana

Marriage 1 Emma Snyder b: 23 MAY 1884 in Asbury Park, , New Jersey

Children

1. Has No Children Margaret Marquis b: 29 JUN 1927 in Bibb, Georgia


Sources:

1. Title: 684427.ged
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 6, 2002
2. Title: wood.FTW
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 20, 2002

[NI0007]

LAST WILL AND TESTAMENT
OF
EMMA SYNDER


I, EMMA SYNDER, over the age of 21 years, a resident and citizen of Palm Beach County, Florida, being or sound and disposing mind and memory, having in mind all those might expect to benefit from my estate and being awrae of the uncertainty of this life, do make, publish and declare this my last Will and Testament, hereby specifically revoking and annulling any and all Wills, Codicils
and Testamentary dispositions of whatsoever nature, that is to say:

I.
I direct my executor, hereinafter appointed, to pay my lawful debts and the expenses, inheritance, estate, legacy, succession or other death taxes payable in respect of my estate or of any devise, legacy or distribution under this my Will, or levied by reason or my death whether or not the property transfer or proceeds with respect to which said taxes are levied passes by reason of or under this my Will.


II.
I give, devise and bequeth unto JERRY TURNER, of West Palm Beach, Florida, should he be living, all the cut glass, fancy plates and other dishes which originally belonged to his mother and are in my home.

III.
I give and bequeath to NORMAN GEER all my fern plants.
[Handwritten] including Racks also on the trees

IV
All the rest, residue and remainder of my estate, of whatever nature, whether real, personal, intangible or otherwise, and wheresoever situate, whether within or without the state of Florida and whether by me now owned or hereafter acquired, I give, devise and bequeath unto my sister, SARAH HAVENS, residing at 37 Pinetree Way, Belmar, New Jersey, absolutely and forever.

V.
I constitute, designate and appoint as sole Executrix of this my Last Will and Testament,
my sister, SARAH HAVENS, and direct that she be permitted to serve in this and other jurisdictions without bond or security of any kind, all requirements of bond and security, statutory or other wise being by me specifically waived; I further empower my sister as my Executor to make sale of any or all of my assets without application to or order of court at either public or private sale as she may see fit.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and seal at West Palm Beach, Florida, this 30th day of July, 1963.


Emma Synder [signature](SEAL)
Emma Synder
The foregoing instrument consisting of this and one preceding typewritten page identified by signature of testatrix in the margin thereof was subscribed, published and declared by the above named testatrix to be her last will and testament in the presence of us the undersigned, who at her request and in her presence andin (sic) the presence of each other, have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses the day and year last above a foresaid.

Otis B. Russell, Jr [signature]4207 Broadway, W. Palm Beach [handwritten]

WitnessAddress

Georgia S. Russell [signature]428 41st W. P. B. [handwritten]

WitnessAddress


[Seal]
State of Florida - Palm Beach County
I hereby certify that the foregoing is a true copy as recorded in my office, This 26th day of Oct, 1987
John B. Dunkle
Clerk of Circuit Court
By [signature]
Deputy Clerk
File Record 314 page 263-4
(see Scrapbook for actual document)



Obituary of Emma Synder, Palm Beach Post, April 30, 1968; page 7
MISS EMMA SYNDER
Miss Emma Synder, 83, of 410 Spencer Dr., West Palm Beach, died Friday.
Survivors include two nieces, Mrs. Gladys Goodrich and Mrs. Emma Havens, both of Belmar, N. J.
Interment will take place in Neptune, N.J. with the Franoloni and Lopez Funeral Home in charge.
Friends may call from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. today at the Northwood Funeral Home.
(see scrapbook for actual document)



A letter to Bureau of Health, City of Asbury dated May 29, 1958 from Margaret Wood did not locate birth certificate of Emma Synder.

A form letter from New Jersey State Department of Health, State Registrar of Vital Statistics dated November 20, 1987 states that no record of birth of Emma Synder found on May 23, 1884.



Emma worked at a women's clothing store Anthonys Store (305) 586 5521 per William R. Wood, Sr.

[NI0013] buried by Rev William Levesque Dunstable Congregational Church

worked as volunteer Water Commissioner from 1968-1983. The Dunstable, MA Watershed and Distribution Station was dedicated to him in November of 1985. A monument at the entrance of the well site reads: Merle A. Page Watershed and Distribution Station in memory of his dedication to the Dunstable Water Department, Water Commissioner 1968-1983."

[NI0016] Obituary of Orville T. Wood dated November 1, 1927

Orville T. Wood died at his home on Limerock street November 1, breathing his last in the same room where he was born 79 years ago. He had been an invalid for nearly five years.

The deceased was a son of Aaron and Amanda (Healey) Wood. In his younger days he worked in the limerock quarries, and leaving this vocation conducted a trucking business until failing health compelled his retirement from active labor. For number of years he operated a buckboard, and carried excursion parties to points within the radius of 30 miles. Friends knew him as a very industrious citizen and the soul of good humor, ever ready to assist those in need, and always in a genial frame of mind.

Mr. Wood was twice married, his first wife being Mary York of Damariscotta, and the second wife Mary Josephine Sprague of Waldoboro. Surviving the First Union is one daughter Mrs. Michael Halligan, and of the second marriage the four surviving daughters-Mrs. Leroy Kalloch, Miss Carrie Wood, George W. Wood and Miss Amanda Wood.

The funeral services were conducted by Rev. B. P. Brown and there were many evidences, through the medium of floral offerings and otherwise of the sorrow which the community felt in the loss of a longtime neighbor. The burial was in the Robbins cemetery. The bearers were John E. Brewster, J. Robert Adams, Silas Norton, Frankie Robbins, William Frye and Walter (end of obituary).


Buried in Robbins Cemetary 44 06.52 069 09.04. See the scrapbook for a map.

[NI0017] Obituary Mary Josephine Wood

Mrs. Mary Josephine Wood, wife of Orville Wood died at her home 320 Limerock Street, Rockland Maine at 12 o'clock Wednesday night age 42. Deceased was born in Waldoboro, Maine. She lived in the city 16 years and survived by a husband and three children. The affair is particularly sad from the fact that one of the children is but a young baby. The funeral will occur Saturday at 2 p.m. Rev. L L Hanscom officiating.

Source: Joan Hooper-handwritten record page 4. Parenthetically the young baby was George Washington Wood Sr.

[NI0018] Searched the follwoing online databases 20080313:
Ancestry World Tree /worldconnect.genealogy.rootsweb.com
FamilySearch - Pedigree Resource File/www.familysearch.org
MyTrees.com - Ancestry Archive/www.kindredkonnections.com
GenCircles - Global Tree/genealogy.about.com
GeneaNet/http://www.geneanet.org/
FamilySearch - Ancestral File/www.familysearch.org
GenServ/www.genserv.com
Yates Publishing - Computerized Ancestor/www.sanbachs.net
Genealogy.com - World Family Tree/http://familytreemaker.genealogy.com/wftonline/


Dad found marriage certificate Thomaston handwritten
Orville Augusta

Died March 23, 1905 - by chance in city clerk - went through twice - died in Rockland born in Belfast 1817 -> occupation quarryman by Father

Father Aaron Wood
Mother not listed
page death certificate

undertaker G. A. Burpee, Rockland, Maine

The death certificate of Aaron Wood reveals that he was living at the poor farm for about 14 years until his death in 1905. The poor farm is called the Rockland City Alms House. Aunt Ginny recalls her father (George Washington Wood) visiting Aaron on "poor farm" in Rockland. Records were burned in fire according to William R. Wood, Sr.

Place of burial was initially tomb March 25 1905 at Sea View Cemetary then interment at Robbins Cemetary (Apr 21 1905) lot #1 So end; Clergyman: Rev Mr Sutcliff per funeral records of Burpee Funeral Home.

Children listed on funeral records:
Rebecca K. Radcliff Boston
Jerome B. Wood Rockland
Eliza A. Rockland
Orville T. Rockland
James H. Rockland

Postcard from Belfast Town Office 3/29/00 -> "no mention of Aaron Wood in any of our records."

In 1860 Knox was established from the remaining Lincoln County (1860 map). Thus the original Lincoln County which covered almost 90% of Maine has been divided into many other counties between 1790 and 1860. Your search must take into account the time frames of your ancestors and not just the current boundaries (current county map - No changes since 1913).

The 1900 Census indicates that Aaron born in Maine as were his parents

1870 Census lists Amanda as head of household - No Aaron Wood
1880 Census lists Amanda as head of household - No Aaron Wood

[NI0026] ?Sally Amanda Wood 1949 1901
1901 1962 Ralph Glendenning Achorn Avenue Lot 489
kEPT HER MAIDEN NAME WHEN WIFE

Named from

[NI0027] Not found in census of 1870 under Amanda Wood

[NI0028] Achorn cemetery records indicate his dated birth to be Jan. 12, 1879. This is and error and a more likely dated birth is that which is listed on his death certificate. A note in the entry of his cemetery records indicates "G. A. R. Marker. 2 granite, one funeral Marker, and one marble. The dated birth, 1879, or his wife's day of 1839, would seem to be an errot but it is given so"

Pauline E. Murray - buried with Jerome's children
ADA (on paper -> Dunbar)

[NI0029] Eliza on funreal records of Aaron so death > 1905

[NI0034] Newcastle

[NI0035] No children - personal record Margaret S Wood p10 - possession of William R. Wood, Jr.

He maybe buried in Waldoboro in German Cemetary (there is another William Sprague earlier)

[NI0038] Sheep 27

[NI0039] Augusta 25

[NI0040] Mass 24

[NI0041] Nurse in Mass 22

[NI0046] Good Day,

I have met two women who have been working on the Kunesh family. Yes,
there is a connection. Alous's parents were Wenzil Kunesh (1895-1955) and
Mary Kalcik (1898 - 1923). Mary had four sons and died a few weeks after
giving birth to her first daughter. I guess Wenzil was a drunk and
basically a never-do-well. Basically all his sons left the area when they
were old enough as I understand.

If his wife is still living, we would really appreciate it if she would
have any information on his brothers. Specifically, there was a Stanley who
moved to California and died in 1978 and was suppose to have had three kids.
Does she know who they are and where they are presently located. And there
was a Wenzil Jr. (Jimmy) Kunesh who was supposed to have lived in Milwaukee.
The other ladies think he had a son Dennis, but again, we are not sure.
Maybe your Aunt Gini might have some knowledge of these people.

Also, if your Aunt Gini or your cousins are interested, I can send them
a copy of what we have on the Kunesh family. I would be happy to do it for
them. Many of us are still living and farming in the Kewaunee area. We
have it traced back to 1831 in Bohemia.

Do you have information on your two cousins. The only thing we know
about them is what was in your uncle's obituary. We would appreciate
whatever information you have on them.

Have a Good Day,

Jim Steinberger

Jim

[NI0050] Died of Lupus - long illness

[NI0061] Died in Bangor George Wood MD Asiatic Flu

[NI0065] My father told me that Freddie died in Florida in 2000 - See Scrapbook for obituitary.

Freddie lived and grew-up in Ash Point, Maine and then on Limerock Street with his grandmother and father.

Obituitary
FREDERICK WOOD
FORT LAUDERDALE. Fla. - Frederick H. Wood. 42. formerly of Owls Head, died unexpectedly Dec. 22, 2000. at a local hospital.
Born in Bangor Jan. 31, 1958, he was a son of George W. Jr. and Rae Dennis Wood. Moving to Owls Head at a young age, he lived at Ash Point and attended Owls Head and Rockland schools. He was a 1976 graduate of Rockland High School, where he was a member of the baseball team. A Florida resident more than 20 years, Mr. Wood worked in property management and as manager of a pool company until being disabled eight years ago. In more recent years. he volunteered with shelters for the homeless.
He was a member of God's Touch Ministry in Fort Lauderdale.
Mr. Wood is survived by two sons. Michael Wood and Frederick Wood Jr., and a daughter Kathryn Wood, all of Massachusetts; two brothers, George W. Wood III and his wife, Becky, of Owls Head, and Raymond Wood of Virginia; two sisters, Electa Cerce and her husband, the Rev. Stephen Cerce, of Camden, and Andrea Schade of Searsmont; and several nieces and nephews.
A celebration of Mr. Wood's life will he held 10 a.m. Thursday at the Family Worship Center, 23 Conway Road, Camden, the Rev. Stephen Cerce officiating. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to God's Touch Ministry, c/o Family Worship Center, 23 Conway Road, Camden, ME 04843. Arrangements are with Burpee-Strong Funeral Home, Rockland.

[NI0089] buried Thomaston Avenue #6
Designed High School???

[NI0090] Buried Thomaston Avenue #6

[NI0093] Seaview Cemetery

[NI0094] Camden Street Aunt Ginny took over house
Buried Village Cemetery Thomaston
Margaret Wood has born 1885

[NI0095] Died in Rockland Convalescent Home

[NI0096] BEVERLY LILIENTHAL
THOMASTON - Beverly Kirkpatrick Lilienthal 79, died July 29, 2004, at her home with her family and friends present after a long illness.

She was born in Rockland Jan. 3, 1925, the daughter ofHerbert Earle and Adella Townsend Gilmore Kirkpatrick.

She graduated from Thomaston High School in 1943, where she served as editor-in-chief of the "Sea Breeze," the high school yearbook. She was a member of the Orchestra, Glee Club and Student Council and partcipated in sports and club activities. After graduating high school she worked as a member of the War Rationing Board during World War II and later as a teller at Depositors Trust in Rockland.

In 1950 she married Arthur Lilienthal. The couple lived in Lynn, Mass., Schenectady, N.Y., and Bay Shore, Long Island, before returning with their family in 1968 to live in Thomaston.

In addition to being a wife and mother, she was always active in community and civic affairs. During her years in New York, she served as a volunteer with the Girl Scouts of America, the Cub Scouts of America and other organizations.

Upon returning to Thomaston, she became a charter member of the Thomaston Fourth of July Committees, serving for more than 25 years. She and her husband were Fourth of July Parade Grand Marshals in 1988. She also was a member of the Thomaston Bicentennial Committee and a lifetime member of the Thomaston Historical Society. She was a member of the Garden Club, the Friends of Montpelier, and a volunteer at the Gen. Henry Knox Museum.

She was predeceased by her husband, Arthur G. Lilienthal Sr., who died Dec. 10, 1992.

Survivors include two sons, Arthur G. Lilienthal Jr. and wife, Catherine, of Baldwinsville,
N.Y.: Stephen K. Lilienthal and his wife, Emily, of Thomaston; two daughters, Cheryl A. Lilienthal and partner, Curt Carleen, of Saunderstown, RI.; and Tracey L. and her husband, James E. Thompson, of Belchertown, Mass.; five grandsons, Drake, Matthew, Thomas, Arthur and Michael; and one great-grandson, Conor.

Visiting hours will be held from 7 to 9 p.m. Monday at Davis Funeral Home, 35 Knox St., Thomaston, where a funeral will be held 1 p.m. Tuesday with the Rev. Tacey French officiating. A reception will follow the funeral at Davis Funeral Home.

A private interment service will be held at Village Cemetery, Thomaston. Memorial donations may be sent to: Thomaston 4th of July Committee, do Douglas Erickson, 10 Elliot St., Thomaston, ME 04861, or the American Diabetes Association, Maine Chapter, 7 Palmer Road, Skowhegan, ME 04976.

From Courier Gazette Saturday, July 31st, 2004, page A2

[NI0102] Seaview Cemetery

[NI0112] Buried Village Cemetery Thomaston

[NI0115] Arnold Hoching, son of Gladys Belle Barter daughter of Ernestine Kirkpatrick daughter of John C and Elizabeth Kirkpatrick lives in original home in South Thomaston, Maine per Joan Goddard.

According to Aunt Ginnie, John and Elizabeth Kirkpatrick came over in 1871 and had 7 or 8 children (January 2003 telephone call)

[NI0117] Information about children obtained from Joan Goddard TC 2/5/2000. Settled in Massachusetts.

[NI0118] Joan Goddard TC 2/5/2000 is descendent

[NI0119] ?Broadfoot

[NI0120] Settled in Leominster, Massachusetts area per Joan Goddard TC 2/5/2000

[NI0121] 4 sons

[NI0123] 5 children ?Flarn factory p15

[NI0128] 77 years old and 2 months
He was not listed in 1889 Directory. I am not sure if this is correct ancestor.

[NI0139] According to Joan Goddard TC 2/5/2000 died in 20's in Philapines

[NI0149] Not listed in 1889 Rockland City Directory

[NI0155] Reverand
Aetna ME
Civil War 1861
Sea View Cemetery

[NI0159] Rebecca Jones with Arthur Jones (3 years old) noted inYear: 1870; Census Place: Rockland, Knox, Maine; Roll: M593_548; Page: 205; Image: 410.

[NI0177] Adam and Callie Kalloch

[NI0186] The death certificate of son Aaron lists the name of father as Aaron Wood and his birthplace as Belfast Maine. The death certificate does not list the occupation of father, his birthdate, or death. The death certificate does not list maiden name of mother.

[NI0213] Tombstone according Aunt Ginny indicates "he went west"
Asa was one of eight children Cyrus Eaton

died 8/30/1880 in Lawrence Kansas (in route from Colorado to Rockland when he died per Dad from Rockland Directory

[NI0214] Title: Broad Bay Pioneers
Author: Wilfrod W. Whitaker, Gary T. Horlacher
Publication: Picton Press, 1998
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Book
Page: 312
from http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=barrybev&id=I2470 Barry Beverage

[NI0215] Rebecca Hathorn
Title: Broad Bay Pioneers
Author: Wilfrod W. Whitaker, Gary T. Horlacher
Publication: Picton Press, 1998
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Book
Page: 312
from http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=barrybev&id=I2470 Barry Beverage

[NI0216] He was a minute man from Attleboro at the Lexington Alarm and served subsequently as a corporal.
Lake Avenue - Revolutionary War hero
Served as corporal under Capt. Caleb Richardson 1775 DAR V24 p307

Rockland originally part of Thomaston. Named changed to E. Thomaston 7/28/1848. Changed again to Rockland in 7/17/1850 and incorporated 1854. Originally part of Lincoln County and Knox County created 4/1/1860 with Rockland as Shiretown.

Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the War of the Revolution (17 volumes): Healey, Eliphaz, Attleborough. Corporal, Capt. Caleb Richardson's co., Col Timothy Walker's regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted May 1, 1775; service 3mos. 8 days.

American Genealogical - Biographical Index (AGBI): Healey Eliphaz b. 175?; Birthplace: Massachusetts; Biographical Info: corp.; Reference: soldiers and sailors of the Rev. War. Comp/ By secy. Of the commowealth, Ms. Boston. 1896-1908. (17v):7:656

American Genealogical - Biographical Index (AGBI): Healey Eliphaz b. 175?; Birthplace: Massachusetts; Biographical Info: priv.; Reference: Index of Rev. Pensioners living in Me. By Chas Allcott Flagg. Dover, Me. 1920. (91p.):49

Cemetary located on Lake View Avenue just past Kaler's Stone at intersection of Old County Road and Rt 17

From History Of Thomaston, Rockland, and South Thomaston, Maine v2 Cyrus Eaton p153 v1:
Eliphaz and Welcome Healey, two brothers, came from Attleboro', Mass., in 1780, and purchased or took up the two lots on which they lived and died, and which are still known by their names. Benjamin Blackington, before mentioned, probably from the same region, took up the three lots on which his three sons settled as follows, viz. : James on the south-western, Benjamin, Jr., on the middle, and Nathan on the northeastern. Another lot was obtained by Oliver Robbins (2d), on which be settled and which is still occupied by his descendents. It is not improbable that some of these farms had been previously in possession of other occupants, whose names have not come down to us. If they had not, the reason may have been that they were reserved by the Proprietors for their own or their tenants' use, on account of the Meadows.

From History Of Thomaston, Rockland, and South Thomaston, Maine v2 Cyrus Eaton v2 p261:
came to this place in 1780 and bought in connectionwith his brother-in-law, N. Woodcock (my note - married to sister Rebecca), the J. Alexander lot, at Oyster River, but settled west of the Meadows, Thomaston, a farmer; and d. Oct 10, 1833


Name Nature of Claim Congress Session Manner Brought Journal Page Referred to Committee Date Report Bill House Disposed Senate Disposed Congress Date Comments
Eliphaz Healey Pension for revolutionary services 22 1 Petition 44 Rev. Claims 20 Dec 1831 Report by bill 52 Passed Indef. postp'd

On November 16, 2003, Kirky, Billy Vicki and I stopped to visit my father on our way from Bath/Brunswick back to Bangor. We stopped to visit my mother's grave in Thomaston and picked up my dad in Rockland and went to West Meadow Road cemetary then Tolman Cemetary where Eliphaz (Eliphalet on Lucy's gravestone) is buried. The GPS coordinates are 44 07.77 069 07.38. We took some pictures which are in the scrapbook.

I obtained this 20050904 from web search:
Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the War of the Revolution, 17 Vols.
Healey, Eliphaz, Attleborough. Corporal, Capt. Caleb Richardson's co., Col. Timothy Walker's regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted May 1, 1775; service, 3 mos. 8 days.

Healey, Resolved, Attleborough. Private, Capt. Jabez Ellis's (Attleborough) co. of Minute-men, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 6 days.
Healey, Resolved. List of men raised in Bristol Co., agreeable to resolve of Dec. 2, 1780, as attested by James Williams, Superintendent for said county, dated Taunton; also, list of men raised to serve in the Continental Army, returned as received by John Burt, at Taunton, April 18, 1781, to be conducted to Springfield and delivered to Col. Shepard; age, 28 yrs.; stature, 5 ft. 8 in.; complexion, dark; occupation, cordwainer; engaged for town of Attleborough; term, 3 years; also, Private, Capt. Ebenezer Smith's co., Lieut. Col. Calvin Smith's (6th) regt.; returns for wages; wages allowed said Healey from April 15, 1781, to Dec. 31, 1782, 20 mos. 15 days.


Healey, Benjamin. Private, 3d co.; order dated Oct. 28, 1783, for wages for May and 10 days in June [year not given], appearing in a register of orders accepted on account of wages; also, Corporal, 3d co.; order dated Oct. 28, 1783, for wages for 20 days in June, and the month of July [year not given], appearing in a register of orders accepted on account of wages.


Healy, Eliphaz, Attleborough. Private, Capt. Jabez Ellis's (Attleborough) co. of Minute-men, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 11 days; also, Corporal, Capt. Caleb Richardson's co., Col. Timothy Walker's regt.; company return dated Oct. 6, 1775; also, order for bounty coat or its equivalent in money dated Camp at Roxbury, Nov. 20, 1775.
Healy, Eliphaz. Private, Capt. Isaac Washburn's co. of guard;s enlisted March 11, 1781; discharged April 11, 1781; service, 1 mo.; company stationed at Thomaston, Lincoln Co.

[NI0217] Search on Ancestry.com at Maine Will Abstracts, 1640-1760 for Lucy Healey and Lucy Robinson reveals no results 3/14/2000

Lucy is buried at Tolman Cemetery of Lake View Drive. We visited the Cemetery on November 16th, 2003 with my father. Of note on her gravestone was the spelling of her husband Eliphalet Healy. This is the only place I have seen the spelling. The scrapbook contains a photograph of her gravestone.

Eliphaz's scrapbook includes a map to Tolman Cemetery.

[NI0242] Albert L. Hunt enlisted age 18 (1863) in Company A, 24th Massachusett's Infantry. Civil War veteran - discharged June 20,1866 - rank of Corporal

[NI0259] 2/6/2000

Mr. and Ms. Wood

Gen. Wm. Whipple had one son who died at approximately age 1. The general had two brothers who also died childless so there
are no direct descendants from this line carrying the Whipple surname. He had sisters, at least one of which had descendants, so
the line continues but with different surnames.

Malachi Whipple, born 20 June 1770 in Stoningham, Ct., married Priscilla Brown 5 Oct. 1796 in Guilderland, N.Y. had a son Ethan.
I do not have a middle initial for this Ethan nor do I have a birthdate but he is the closest Ethan I can find in my files to meet your
birth year of 1804. Malachi died in 1861. Priscilla was born in 1777 and died in 1860.

I hope this is helpful in your family research.

Blaine Whipple

bwhipple@teleport.com

[NI0275] J Goodrich, 35 Pine Tree Way, Belmar, NJ 07719-2846 (732) 681 2678

[NI0277] She is the informant on the Death Certificate for Emma Synder dated 5/1/1968

[NI0280] # ID: I11770
# Name: Emma Elizabeth Marquis 1 2
# Sex: F
# Birth: 29 APR 1855 in , Jackson, Missouri 1 2
# Death: 29 NOV 1943 in Winfield, Cowley, Kansas 1 2
# Burial: 1 DEC 1943 Floral Cemetery, Winfield, Cowley, Kansas 1 2
# Reference Number: MMRE4S
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Letter From Cowley County Gen. Society
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P130 Westport
Date: 26 Jun 1860
Title: 1860 Census, Jackson, Missouri
Author: U.S.Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED178 Sh9 Ln7
Title: 1880 Census Cowley, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED58 P7
Title: 1900 Census Cowley, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government
!1860 Census calls her Eliza E. 1880 census lists her as M. E. 1900 census has E.E. Death Certificate lists Emma Elizab eth, born in Jackson Co, MO on April 29, 1855. Marriage lic ense and certificate has Eliza E crossed out with Emma ove r it in two places. 1900 Census says she had 10 kids, all l iving and she was married 25 years. Emma Marquis is liste d as a member of Lone Jack Church in Aug 1860.



Father: William S Marquis b: 1818 in Howard, Missouri
Mother: Hannah Rhoads b: DEC 1816 in Jefferson, Indiana

Marriage 1 Andrew Jackson Yarbrough b: JUN 1845 in , Dade, Missouri

* Married: 21 APR 1875 in Winfield, Cowley, Kansas 1 2
* Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Marriage License And Certificate, Cowley, Kansas
Author: Probate Judge
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

Children

1. Has No Children Rosellie Yarbrough b: 1876 in , , Kansas
2. Has No Children Wade M Yarbrough b: 1878 in , , Kansas
3. Has No Children Dora Yarbrough b: 1880 in , , Kansas
4. Has No Children Ira Lewis Yarbrough b: 6 APR 1882 in , , Kansas
5. Has No Children Opha P. Yarbrough b: JUL 1884 in , , Kansas
6. Has No Children Stella Yarbrough b: NOV 1886 in , , Kansas
7. Has No Children Mamie Yarbrough b: NOV 1889 in , , Kansas
8. Has No Children Russel R. Yarbrough b: NOV 1890 in , , Kansas
9. Has No Children Floyd A. Yarbrough b: OCT 1893 in , , Kansas
10. Has No Children Glen G. Yarbrough b: NOV 1896 in , , Kansas


Sources:

1. Title: 684427.ged
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 6, 2002
2. Title: wood.FTW
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 20, 2002

[NI0281] # ID: I11806
# Name: George Wilson Marquis 1 2
# Sex: M
# Birth: 1807 in Kentucky 1 2
# Death: 1861 in Lafayette, Missouri 1 2
# Reference Number: MMRG5S
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P233
Title: 1810 Census Madison, Kentucky
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P381
Title: 1830 Census Ray, Missouri
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P150
Title: 1840 Census Lafayette, Missouri
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P160
Date: 26 Sep 1850
Title: 1850 Census, Lafayette, Missouri
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P221
Date: Aug 1860
Title: 1860 Census, Jackson, Missouri
Author: U.S.Government
!Robert has a son born before 1810 according to the 1810 ce nsus. George was listed separately in the 1830 census, bu t he was in Ray Co, MO near Robert. Later his son was livin g with William which all suggests he was the older brother . Also on 1850 in Lafayette Co and 1860 census in Jackson C o., Missouri. Wagonmaker. There is a Geo. W. Marquis in 187 0 in Cedar, MO. Age is off by 10 years. Different wife, con siderable younger, born in VA. IGI list ordinances for Geor ge Washington Marquis, born Nov14, 1803 in KY. Not clear wh o this is. Helen Cooper says his middle name was Wilson aft er the schoolmaster Wilson who helped raise the 7 orphans . She list the day and month of his birthday as 13 Jun, 180 7. George was made Deacon in Lone Jack church in 1853 and w as elder or minister in 1859. Geo W. Marquis Sr and Mary Ma rquis joined 20 Aug 1858. He joined the Church of Christ, L exington, Lafayette, MO as Deacon on 17 Apr 1836 along wit h Lavina Marquis and James A Marquis, 977.8453 H2h p437. Th e write-up about his son says that he came to Lafayette i n 1819, age 12, one of first settlers, and died 1861.
CENSUS:
1840 Lafayette, MO p150 GSF#14856
George W. Marquis
1m under5 1f 20-30
1m 5-10
1m 30-40
1830 Ray, MO GSF#14854 p381
George Marquis
1m 20-30
1m 15-20
1850 Lafayette, MO GSF#443611 p160 26Sep1850
George W. Marquis 43 KY Wagonmaker
Mary 42 Ky
Joseph D. 17 MO
James T. 13 MO
George W. 10 MO
Martha L 2 MO
1860 Jackson, MO GSF#803625 p221 mid Aug?
George W. Marquis 52 KY Wagonmaker
Mary 52 KY
James T. 25 MO
Martha L.(or S) 12 MO
Lucinda E. 9 MO



Father: Robert Marquis b: 31 AUG 1785 in Pennsylvania
Mother: Levina Jones b: 30 NOV 1784 in Frederick, Virginia

Marriage 1 Mary Duncan b: 1808 in Kentucky

* Married: 29 MAR 1832 in Ray, Missouri 1 2
* Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: IGI

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P2
Title: Marriages Of Ray, Missouri

Children

1. Has No Children Joseph Duncan Marquis b: 1833 in Missouri
2. Has Children James Thomas Marquis b: 30 MAY 1835 in Missouri
3. Has Children George W Marquis b: 23 OCT 1840 in Missouri
4. Has No Children Martha S Marquis b: 1848 in Missouri
5. Has No Children Lucinda E Marquis b: 1851 in Missouri


Sources:

1. Title: 684427.ged
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 6, 2002
2. Title: wood.FTW
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 20, 2002

[NI0282] # ID: I11970
# Name: Andrew Jackson Yarbrough 1 2
# Sex: M
# Birth: JUN 1845 in , Dade, Missouri 1 2
# Death: 1904 in Winfield, Cowley, Kansas 1 2
# Burial: Floral Cemetery, Winfield, Cowley, Kansas 1 2
# Reference Number: MYRA4I
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P555
Date: 20 Jul 1870
Title: 1870 Census, Bourbon, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED178 Sh9 Ln7
Title: 1880 Census Cowley, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED58 P7
Title: 1900 Census Cowley, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government

!CENSUS: 1880 Cowley, KS Richland twp ED178, S9, L7 GSF#447181 (soun dex)
A.J Yarbrough 34 MO
M.E. 25 MO wife
Rosellie 4 KA dau
W. M. 2 KA son
Dora 4/12 KA dau
Hannah Marquis 65 IN BL
1900 Cowley, KS ED58 sh7 Richland GSF#1370389
A.J. Yarbrough 54 Jun1845 MO TN VA married 25yrs
E.E 45 Apr1855 MO MO IN 10kids, all Unknown
Ira L. 18 Apr1882 KS male
Ohha P. 15 Jul1884 KS female
Stella 13 Nov1886 KS female
Mamie 10 Nov1889 KS
Russel R 9 Nov1890 KS
Floyd A 6 Oct1893 KS
Glen G 3 Nov1896 KS Listed on 978.189 X2m V2 Early residents of Cowley, KS, se e father.
Cowley County Heritage Book: Andrew Jackson (b1845) was i n the 12th Missouri Cavalry and came to Cowley County in 18 71. In 1875 he married Mary Emma Marquis, daughter of W. S . and Hannah Marquis who had an adjacent claim. Andrew die d in 1904 and Mary Emma in 1943. Both are buried in Flora l Cemetery. Their children were: Roselie (Ella?), Wade, D ora, Ira Lewis, Opha, Stella, Mamie, Russell, Floyd, and Gl enn.



Marriage 1 Emma Elizabeth Marquis b: 29 APR 1855 in , Jackson, Missouri

* Married: 21 APR 1875 in Winfield, Cowley, Kansas 1 2
* Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Marriage License And Certificate, Cowley, Kansas
Author: Probate Judge
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

Children

1. Has No Children Rosellie Yarbrough b: 1876 in , , Kansas
2. Has No Children Wade M Yarbrough b: 1878 in , , Kansas
3. Has No Children Dora Yarbrough b: 1880 in , , Kansas
4. Has No Children Ira Lewis Yarbrough b: 6 APR 1882 in , , Kansas
5. Has No Children Opha P. Yarbrough b: JUL 1884 in , , Kansas
6. Has No Children Stella Yarbrough b: NOV 1886 in , , Kansas
7. Has No Children Mamie Yarbrough b: NOV 1889 in , , Kansas
8. Has No Children Russel R. Yarbrough b: NOV 1890 in , , Kansas
9. Has No Children Floyd A. Yarbrough b: OCT 1893 in , , Kansas
10. Has No Children Glen G. Yarbrough b: NOV 1896 in , , Kansas


Sources:

1. Title: 684427.ged
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 6, 2002
2. Title: wood.FTW
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 20, 2002

[NI0283] Springfield, MO August 1953 from Obituary[Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED171 Sh12
Date: 17 Jun 1900
Title: 1900 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED202 Sh11
Date: 26 Apr 1910
Title: 1910 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Conversations with Mrs. Jean Marquis
Source Comments: Mrs. Marquis, nee Bearden, was the wife of Billy Marquis and mother of Donna Haroldsen. Donna has notes of several converations with her about family history.
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

!Donna's mom says Oliver had a brother named Ben. She says he didn't marry. He was living in Texas in 1955 according to Frank's obituary. He is not listed on Carl's obituary in 1967.

The Kansas City Times, Friday, November 15, 1957:
MARQUIS--Ben Harrison Marquis, 69, of 1919 1/2 Main, died Tuesday at the Veterans Hospital, where he had been a patient for two weeks. Mr. Marquis was born in Kansas City. He was a veteran of World War I. A brother, W. E. Marquis, West Palm Beach, Fla., survives. Services will be at 9:30 o'clock today at the Newcomer chapel. Burial will be in Memorial Park Cemetery.

[NI0284] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Have not found him in 1870. Looked in 1870 in Nebraska. Found Charles in Cass Co, p103, age 23 from PA. Looked in Iowa in 1870. Found several, all on East side, not by river. William and George in Blackhawk Co are from IN. Several in Clark Co were there in 1860. There is William Marquiss in Washington Co, p230 I did not look up. There is a William in Cherokee Co, KA. He is 33 from OH.

Isaac Newton Marquis
Prepared by Brent Haroldsen
1251 Sprague Street, Manteca, California
November, 1998

BIRTH: His death certificate says he was born 27 December 1854 and that he was 86 when he died on December 8, 1940. These are not consistent since he would still be 85 on December 8 if he was born in 1854. The 1860 Census lists his age as 6 in June. The 1880 Census lists his age as 26. This would make his birth in 1853. The 1900 Census says he was born Dec 1851 and lists his age as 48 in June. The 1910 Census appears to say age 61 but it is hard to read. The 1920 Census lists age as 65 on January 12. His marriage license says he was 21 on July 9, 1874. My guess is the early census records when he was a child or young man are correct so he was born in 1853. I guess the day and month on his death certificate are probably correct, since people usually know what day they celebrate their birthday, and that the age is correct, but the year is wrong because they subtracted his age from the year of death without considering that he had not yet had a birthday that year. His death certificate lists his full name as Isaac Newton Marquis. Various census records say Isaac N. or I.N. Marquis. His marriage license says Isaac Marquis. All census records say he was born in Missouri except the 1920 census, which says US.

PARENTS: The 1860 census in Jackson County, Missouri shows William S. and Hannah Marquis with a son Isaac. Hannah's maiden name was Rhodes. There is little question that this is the right Isaac because the family moved to Cowley County, Kansas, where Isaac was married. Another indication that this is the correct family is that Hannah's brother, Jehial Alfred Rhodes, was the second husband of Mary Jane Sherman, nee Rogers, who was the mother of Isaac's wife, Cordelia. Also, Isaac had a grandson named Carl Rhodes Marquis.

MARRIAGE: His marriage license lists his spouse as Alice Sherman. They were married on July 9, 1874 in Greenwood County, Kansas. He was from Cowley County and she was from Greenwood County. She was 16 years old. They were married at the Eureka House. Her full name was Cordelia Alice Sherman. Isaac's death certificate lists his spouse as Cordelia Alice Marquis. Her death certificate lists her as the widow of Isaac Newton Marquis. The 1880 census lists his wife as Hannah. This is apparently an error since Hannah was his mother. She was probably living with them since her husband died in August of the previous year. The 1900 Census says they were married 26 years. The 1910 census says they were married for 36 years. The 1920 census lists no wife, but says he is married. I don't know where she was then.

CHILDREN: Both the 1900 and 1910 census records say they had six children with five living. The 1880 census lists Franklin, age 4, and William, age 1. The 1900 census lists Frank, age 20 (This is probably William since Frank is listed elsewhere on the census and the age is consistent with William), Jas. H., age 16, Benj., age 12, and Roy, age 1. The sixth child could have been born between Benjamin and Roy. Helen Bearden Marquis, a daughter-in-law of Frank, remembers Uncle Ed (William Edgar), Uncle Bert (James Herbert), Uncle Ben, and Uncle Roy. Frank was Oliver Franklin Marquis, born April, 1876, died 20 January, 1955, married Eva Mae Wyatt, 20 November, 1898 (see separate documentation package). William Edgar was born 13 August 1879, died 13 February 1963, and married (1) Hazel and (2) Naomi. James Herbert was born February 1884, died 3 October 1957, and married Thresa . Helen Marquis says he was married in Plant City, Florida. Benjamin H. was born November 1887. Helen Marquis says he never married. He lived in Texas at the time of Oliver's death. Roy Lee was born 23 July 1898 and died 12 August 1953.

DEATH: He died 8 December, 1940 in Canal Point, Palm Beach, Florida and was buried at Port Mayaca, Palm Beach, Florida on 9 December.

OTHER: Have not found him in 1870. Looked in Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, Indiana, and Iowa. Donna's Aunt Naomi says they went to Florida in 1913 in a covered wagon and that she thinks they stopped for some time in Texas to earn money. The census and death certificate say Isaac was a watchmaker.

CENSUS:
1860 Jackson, MO GSF#803624 p130 Westport 26Jun1860
William S. Marquis 42 MO wagonmaker
Hannah 33 IN
Benjamin 17 MO
William H 11 MO
Sarah J 9 MO
Isaac N 6 MO
Eliza E 5 MO
Louisa E E Dealy 13or18 MO owns $12700 in real estate
Joseph D Marquis 27 MO
W.S. Phonias 21 NY
David Frazier 35 KY
Peter Warwick 28 VA
James Sallye 25 KY
Mary S Pearl 17 MO

1880 Elk, KS GSF#1254380 ED79 S15 16June1880
I.N. Marquis 26 MO MO IN
Hannah 21 IN IN IN
Franklin 4 KS MO IN
William 1 KS MO IN

1900 Wyandotte, KS ED171 S12 GSF#1370389 17Jun1900
I.N. Marquis 48 Dec1851 MO married 26 yrs
C. Alice 42 Apr1858 IN IN IN 6kids, 5alive
Frank 20 Aug1879 KA (probably William, Frank is listed elsewhere)
Jas. H. 16 Feb1884 NE
Benj. 12 Nov1887 MO
Roy 1 Aug1899 MO

1910 Wyandotte, KS ED202 sh11 shawnee twp 26Apr1910
Isaac N. Marquis 61? MO MO IN married 36 yrs
Cordellia A. 52 IN IN IN 6kids, 5living
William E. 31 KS
Benjamin H. 23 MO
Roy L. 12 MO

1920 West Palm Beach, FL ED143 s14 l49 12Jan
Issac N. Marquis 65 US watchmaker married
William E. 40 US
Hazel 30 NE daughterinlaw
Roy L. 21 KS

1920 Pahokee, Palm Beach, FL ED138 SH4 L75 GSF#1820229 8-9Jan1920
Oliver F. Marquis 43 MO MO IN machinist
Eva M. 40 IN IN IN
Carl R. 11 KA MO IN
Earnest K. 8 KA MO IN
Florence B. 6 KA MO IN
Billie S. 5/12 FL MO IN

SOURCES:
Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death Vol.924, #23719, W.E. Marquis informant.
U.S.Government 1860 Census, Jackson, Missouri Page: 130, Westport Twp. 26 Jun 1860.
U.S. Government 1880 Census, Elk, Kansas.
U.S. Government 1900 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas, ED171, Sh12, 17 Jun 1900.
U.S. Government 1910 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas ED202 Sh11 Shawnee Twp., 26 Apr 1910.
U.S. Government 1920 Census, Palm Beach, Florida ED143, Sh14 Ln 49, 12 Jan 1920.
Marriage License, Greenwood County, Kansas, Book 8, p81. Also 978.1913 V28h. Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death, #3958, W.E. Marquis informant. Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death Vol.2439, #8879, Robert J. Marquis informant.
Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death Vol.1912, #33379, Wm. Marquis informant.
U.S. Government 1910 Census, Jackson, Missouri ED39, Sh30, ln 216, Kansas City. Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death Vol.1608, #21151, William E. Marquis informant.

Palm Beach Post, Monday, December 9, 1940, page 10
Isaac N. Marquis
Pahokee--Isaac Newton Marquis, 86, died Sunday noon at his home north of Canal Point.
Mr. Marquis has been a resdient in this section for several years.
Funeral services will be held this morning at 10 o'clock at the Everglades Funeral Home with a Christian Science reader from Belle Glade in charge. Burial will be in the Port Mayaca Cemetery.
He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Cordelia Alice Marquis, Canal Point, and five sons, W. E. and R. L. Marquis, West Palm Beach; O. F. Marquis, Canal Point; J. H. Marquis, Orlando; and B. H. Marquis, Kansas City, Mo.

[NI0285] Address 11/1953 Canal Point, FL

Referred to as Caroline Sherman on death certificate[Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Cordelia Alice Sherman
Prepared by Brent Haroldsen
1251 Sprague Street, Manteca, California
November, 1998

BIRTH: Her death certificate says she was born April, 1858 in Madison, Indiana and that she was 88 when she died on 15 February 1947. The 1860 census lists her age as 2. The 1870 census list her age as 12 in August. The 1880 census for her husband's family lists his spouse as Hannah. Hannah was his mother, but the age, listed as 21, is probably Cordelia's. The 1900 Census says she was born Apr 1858 and lists her age as 42 in June. The 1910 Census says age 52 on April 26. She is not listed on the 1920 Census with her husband, but it says he is married. Her marriage license says she was 16 on July 9, 1874. These are all consistent. All census records say she was born in Indiana. The Madison on the death certificate is Madison City, which is in Jefferson County. The death certificate lists her name as Cordelia Alice Marquis and says her father's last name was Sherman. Her marriage license and the 1870 census say Alice Sherman. The 1860 census says Belia, the 1900 census says C. Alice, and the 1910 says Cordelia A.

PARENTS: The 1860 census in Jefferson County, Indiana shows Belia Shearman and 3 siblings with their mother Mary Shearman living with Moses Rogers, Mary's father. Mary Jane Rogers married Orran Sherman on Dec 25, 1853 . He died 8 April 1860. She later married Jehial Alfred Rhoads. Cordelia married Jehial's nephew, Isaac Marquis. Cordelia's obituary says she was survived by seven sisters and eight brothers, but Mary Jane's obituary lists only six children. Apparently it should have read 2 sisters and 3 brothers. Still, there is no question that this is the right family. We have corresponded with a descendant of one of Orran Sherman's other children who has family records stating that Cordelia married a Marquis, afterwhich htey lost track of her.

MARRIAGE: Her marriage license lists her spouse as Isaac Marquis. They were married on July 9, 1874 in Greenwood County, Kansas. He was from Cowley County and she was from Greenwood County. She was 16 years old. They were married at the Eureka House. His full name was Isaac Newton Marquis. Isaac's death certificate lists his spouse as Cordelia Alice Marquis. Her death certificate lists her as the widow of Isaac Newton Marquis. The 1900 census says they were married 26 years. The 1910 census says they were married for 36 years.

CHILDREN: Both the 1900 and 1910 census records say they had six children with five living. The 1880 census lists Franklin, age 4, and William, age 1. The 1900 census lists Frank, age 20 (This is probably William since Frank is listed elsewhere on the census and the age is consistent with William), Jas. H., age 16, Benj., age 12, and Roy, age 1. The sixth child could have been born between Benjamin and Roy. Helen Bearden Marquis, a daughter-in-law of Frank, remembers Uncle Ed (William Edgar), Uncle Bert (James Herbert), Uncle Ben, and Uncle Roy. Frank was Oliver Franklin Marquis, born April, 1876, died 20 January, 1955, married Eva Mae Wyatt, 20 November, 1898 (see separate documentation package). William Edgar was born 13 August 1879, died 13 February 1963, and married (1) Hazel and (2) Naomi. James Herbert was born February 1884, died 3 October 1957, and married Thresa. Helen Marquis says he was married in Plant City, Florida. Benjamin H. was born November 1887. Helen Marquis says he never married. He lived in Texas at the time of Oliver's death. Roy Lee was born 23 July 1898 and died 12 August 1953.

DEATH: Died 15 February, 1947 in West Palm Beach, Palm Beach, Florida at her residence at 1237 Roebuck Ct. She was removed to Port Mayaca, Florida for burial. Helen Marquis, a daughter-in-law of Oliver Marquis says Cordelia was buried in Sandhill Cemetery.
Cordelia's obituary reads:
West Palm Beach -- Mrs. Cordelia Alice Marquis, 88, resident of West Palm Beach and Canal Point for 34 years, died Saturday at the home of her son, William E. Marquis, 1237 Roebuck ct. here, after a long illness.
The Mizell-Simon mortuary will have charge of services and burial at 2 p.m. Monday at the cemetery at Port Mayaca.
Mrs. Marquis, with her husband, the late Isaac Newton Marquis, came here from Kansas City in 1913. Several years later they moved to Canal Point where Mr. Marquis continued his business as a watchmaker until he died in 1940.
Besides her son, William, she leaves four sons, Roy, West Palm Beach; James H. and Oliver F. Marquis, Canal Point, and Benjamin Marquis, Sacramento, Cal. She also leaves seven sisters and eight brothers.

OTHER: Death certificate of James Herbert Marquis lists her name as Carolina Sherman. The death certificate of Roy Lee Marquis lists Caroline Sherman. The death certificate of William Edgar Marquis lists Cordelia. Oliver Marquis' application for social security lists Caroline Alice Sherman.

After Cordelia's mother remarried, Cordelia apparently moved with her mother and stepfather to Bartholomew County and then to Kansas while the other children remained in Indiana. Her siblings are listed in 1870 with their uncle or grandparents. Ellen Belcher says family tradition says her siblings were raised like orphans. Why would she take only one of her children and leave the other three?

In our research we found other people named Cordelia Alice Sherman that are not the same person. There is a Cordelia A Sherman in Henry Co., MO in the 1870 census. She was the 9-year-old daughter of William and Elizabeth Sherman of New York and Kentucky. This family was also in the 1850 and 1860 census in Warren Co. MO. This Cordelia was too young and she and her parents were born in the wrong state (various census records say her parents were both born in Indiana). There is an Alice Sherman in Decatur, Indiana in 1860. She is the 6-year-old daughter of C.W. and Carolina Sherman of New York and Pennsylvania. She was too old and her parents were born in the wrong the states.

CENSUS:
1860 Jefferson, IN p414 GSF#803270
Mary Shearman 23 IN
Ezra 5 IN
Ann 3 IN
Belia 2 IN
Margaret 2/12 IN
Living with Moses Rogers

1870 Bartholomew, IN ED8 p1
Jehial Rhoads 39 IN Carpenter
Esther 81 PA
Mary J. 33 IN
Alice Sherman 12 IN
Son 1/12 IN

1880 Elk, KS soundex
I.N. Marquis 26 MO
Hannah 21 IN
Franklin 4 KS
William 1 KS

1900 Wyandotte, KS ED171 S12 GSF#1370389 17Jun1900
I.N. Marquis 48 Dec1851 MO married 26 yrs
C. Alice 42 Apr1858 IN IN IN 6kids, 5alive
Frank 20 Aug1879 KA (probably William, Frank is listed elsewhere)
Jas. H. 16 Feb1884 NE
Benj. 12 Nov1887 MO
Roy 1 Aug1899 MO

1910 Wyandotte, KS ED202 sh11 shawnee twp 26Apr1910
Isaac N. Marquis 61? MO MO IN married 36 yrs
Cordellia A. 52 IN IN IN 6kids, 5living
William E. 31 KS
Benjamin H. 23 MO
Roy L. 12 MO

1920 West Palm Beach, FL ED143 s14 l49 12Jan
Issac N. Marquis 65 US watchmaker married
William E. 40 US
Hazel 30 NE daughter in law
Roy L. 21 KS

SOURCES:
Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death, #3958, W.E. Marquis informant.
U.S. Government 1860 Census, Jefferson, Indiana, P414 GSF#803270.
U.S. Government 1870 Census, Bartholomew, Indiana, ED8, p1.
U.S. Government 1880 Census, Elk, Kansas.
U.S. Government 1900 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas, ED171, Sh12, 17 Jun 1900.
U.S. Government 1910 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas ED202 Sh11 Shawnee Twp., 26 Apr 1910.
U.S. Government 1920 Census, Palm Beach, Florida ED143, Sh14 Ln 49, 12 Jan 1920.
Marriage records of Jefferson Indiana, p161.
Madison Courier - Local Matters, 1860 April 9.
West Palm Beach, newspaper unknown, copy in possession of Donna Marquis.
Severy, newspaper unknown, copy in possession of Donna Marquis, received from Greenwood Kansas Gen. Soc.
Letter from Ellen Belcher, 222 Powell St., RR1, Gurley, Alabama
Marriage License, Greenwood County, Kansas, Book 8, p81. Also 978.1913 V28h.
Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death Vol.924, #23719, W.E. Marquis informant.
Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death Vol.2439, #8879, Robert J. Marquis informant.
Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death Vol.1912, #33379, Wm. Marquis informant.
U.S. Government 1910 Census, Jackson, Missouri ED39, Sh30, ln 216, Kansas City.
Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death Vol.1608, #21151, William E. Marquis informant.


1860 Decatur, IN p1065 GSF#803253
C.W. Sherman 37 NY
Carolina 34 PA
Mariah 11 IN
Alice 6 IN
Peter 2 IN
C.B. 4/12 IN
Rachel Braci 60 PA

1870 Henry, MO p211 GSF#552277
William Sherman 63 NY
Elizabeth 56 KY
Margarette Johnston 28 MO
John W Johnston 26 MO
Joseph M Sherman 21 MO
Annie 17 MO
Cordelia A. 9 MO

[NI0318] Soldier of the 4th Maine & re-enlisted, died at Alexandria, VA 7/20/1864
From Candage p1798: George W. of Rockland, member of 2nd Maine Battery, d26July 1864 at King Street Hospital, Alexandria, VA aged 24-6-3 (9/17/1864)

[NI0329] John Kirkpatrick & Son are listed in Rockland City Dircetory 1892. The son is Edgar C Kirkpatrick. No other evidence of lineage.

[NI0331] Check age of mother???

[NI0332] Francis Sprague lived at 35 Camden St in 1875 Directory
Elmira Sprague widow house Camden near Trinity

[NI0334] No children per Joan Goddard TC 2/5/2000

[NI0338] According to Joan Goddard TC 2/5/2000, father John had arthritis and only son overdosed at age 1 on his father's arthritis medication.

[NI0352] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: #40817
Title: Marriage License, State of Alabama
Author: State of Alabama
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: #88468
Title: Death Certificate, State of Texas
Author: Texas Bureau Of Vital Statistics
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED 138, Sh 4, Ln 75
Date: 9 Jan 1920
Title: 1920 Census, Palm Beach, Florida
Author: U.S. Government

!1920 Census, Palm Beach Co. Florida, GSF #1820229, lists age as 5/12 on 9 Jan 1920, spelled Billie.

The Monitor, December 8, 1969, pg. 3
Billy L. Marquis Sr. Alamo--Billy L. Marquis, Sr., 50, died Saturday at Knapp Memorial Hospital in Weslaco. He had lived in Alamo for the past two years. He was a Veteran of World War II.
Survivors are his wife, Mrs. Sandra Marquis; five sons, Billy Wayne, Ronald Roy, Leonard Mays, Melvin Carl, and Bill Stand Marquis; five daughters, Nicollette Roque, Elaine Constance, Jeannie Carol, Cyrstale Holly, Donna May; and a sister, Mrs. Florence Roger.
The body will lie in state at the Skinner Funeral Home Chapel today. The body will be forwarded to National Cemetery in Houston for burial.

[NI0354] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

William S. Marquis
Prepared by Brent Haroldsen
1251 Sprague Street, Manteca, California
December, 1998

BIRTH: The 1850 census lists his age as 32 on 28 September. The 1860 census lists his age as 42 on 26 June. We can not find him in 1870. An index to the 1880 mortality schedule lists him as W. S. Margrus and says he was 61 when he died in 1879. These all indicate that he was born either the last three months of 1817 or the first six months of 1818. In 1850 and 1860 it says he was born in Missouri. The mortality schedule says New York. His father is on the 1817 tax list for Howard County, Missouri so William was probably born there. His father came from Kentucky and, before that, Pennsylvania, so New York seems completely unreasonable. We used an index of the mortality schedule and did not look at a copy of the original record. It may have said KY rather than NY. His father is listed in the 1830 and 1840 censuses for Lafayette County, Missouri. In 1830 there is a male with him between 10 and 15 years of age and in 1840 there is male between 20 and 30. William's age would have been 12 and 22, respectively. Lafayette County formed in 1820 from Cooper County, which formed 17 December 1818 from Howard County, which formed in 1816 as an original county. They may have lived in the same place between 1817 and 1820, but the county changed. William would have been born in Howard County since neither Cooper nor Lafayette was formed at the time of his birth. His license from his second marriage lists his name as William W. Marquis. All other records list William or William S.

PARENTS: Circumstantial evidence indicates that William's parents were Robert Marquis and Lavina Jones. Robert was the only Marquis in Western Missouri in the early and middle 1800's that was old enough to be his father. Dates and locations of the all census records match and his children's names follow traditional naming patterns. The oldest son was named George W. Marquis. George was also the name of Robert's father. The second son was David J. Marquis. Lavinah's father was David Jones. The second daughter was named Mary. This was the name of Robert's mother. We don't know the name of the oldest daughter. George was born in 1807 in Kentucky. David was born in 1813 in Kentucky. Robert was in Madison County, Kentucky in 1810 with a male and a female born between 1800 and 1810. The male would be George. The female would be the oldest daughter, whose name we don't know. I guess that she was named Jane after Lavinah's mother. We know from the Madison County, Kentucky tax roles that Robert was in Kentucky through 1811. Robert was on the 1817 tax list for Howard County, Missouri near the time William was born. As discussed above, William was born in Missouri. There was no 1820 census in Missouri. In 1830 Robert was in Lafayette County, Missouri. There were two males with him whose ages matched David (15-20) and William (10-15) and a female whose age matched Mary's (5-10). George lived in the adjacent county of Ray. In 1840 Robert was still in Lafayette County. He had a male inhabitant the correct age for William (20-30) and a female the correct age for Mary (15-20). George and David lived nearby. In 1850 Robert remained in Lafayette County. Only his daughter Mary remained at home. George and William lived nearby. The 1850 census is the only one that lists Lavina's name. They were married on 23 September 1806. Some records list her name as Savanah because it recorded that way on an index of marriage records. This is an error. I have carefully examined a copy of the original record. The name can be easily mistaken for Savannah, but careful comparison of the first letter with other L's and S's on the same page shows that it is Lavinah.

MARRIAGE: His first spouse was Ruth Whitaker. They were married 6 February 1842 in Lafayette County, Missouri. She is listed as his wife on the 1850 census when she was 30 years old. She was born in Ohio. We have found very little about her. They had a child in 1851 (age 9 on 1860 census). He remarried in March of 1853 so it is possible that she died in childbirth. However, several other people we have researched died around 1851/1852. Family tradition says that one of these, William Dealy, died of cholera, so it is also possible that she died in a cholera epidemic. William's second spouse was Hannah Rhoads. She was previously married to James S. Dealy so she was listed on the marriage record she as Hannah Dealy. They were married on 27 March 1853 in Jackson County, Missouri where she lived. William still lived in Lafayette County. She is listed as his spouse on the 1860 census. She was born in Indiana. Seenotesr on her for more information.

CHILDREN: I know of five children from the first marriage and two from the second based on the 1850 and 1860 census records. The 1900 census says that Hannah had 4 children. At least one and probably two of these were from her first marriage. The children from William's first marriage were Benjamin, Thomas, John, William, and Sarah. From his second marriage were Isaac and Emma.
Benjamin H. Marquis was listed in both the 1850 and 1860 census with William, age 8 and 17 respectively. If these ages are correct, his birth was between 26 June and 28 September 1842. There is a Benjamin A. Marquis listed in 1880 in Reno County, Kansas that seems to be the same person. He was married to Tabitha A. with two children. The same person was listed in 1900 in Umatilla, Oregon with a third child. Thomas I(J). Marquis was 5 years old on the 1850 census but was not with the family on the 1860 census. Thomas Marquis was listed as a member of the Lone Jack Church of Christ on 20 August 1859 and Thomas J. Marquis Jr. was listed in June of 1860. John M. Marquis was 3 years old on the 1850 census but was absent on the 1860 census. There is a John W. Marquies listed in the 1880 census in Reno County, Kansas close to Benjamin. He was born in Missouri, but was listed as 29 years old. This could be him. William H. Marquis was listed on both the 1850 and 1860 census records, age 1 and 11. Sarah J. Marquis was 9 years old on the 1860 census. She married William Brown on 7 May 1871. Presumably these children were all born in Lafayette County, Missouri.
Isaac Newton Marquis was born 27 December 1853. He married Cordelia Alice Sherman. Emma Elizabeth Marquis was born 29 April 1855 in Jackson County, Missouri and died 29 November 1943 in Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas. She married Andrew J. Yarbrough on 21 April 1875 in Cowley County, Kansas and had 10 kids. In the 1860 census she was listed as Eliza E. Marquis. The 1880 census lists her as M.E. Yarbrough and the 1900 census lists her as E.E. Yarbrough. Her death certificate lists her as Emma Elizabeth. Her marriage license had Eliza E. Marquis, but Eliza was crossed out and Emma was written over it in a different handwriting. Emma Marquis was listed as a member of the Lone Jack Church in August 1860.

DEATH: He died 4 August 1879 in Salem Township, Cowley County, Kansas and was buried there at Floral Cemetery.

OTHER: He was listed as a farmer and a wagonmaker on the 1850 and 1860 census records. He was listed as a member of the Lone Jack Church on 31 July 1853. His wife was listed on 24 July 1854. We cannot find the family in the 1870 census. William's daughter, Sarah, was married in Jackson County, Missouri in 1871, which would suggest they were still in Missouri. The family moved to Cowley County, Kansas where William and Hannah were listed as early settlers in 1874. They were both listed as age 50. The same source lists Hannah there in 1878, age 66, but does not list William. William's son, Isaac, married in Greenwood County, Kansas in 1874. He was living in Cowley County at the time. William's daughter, Emma, married in Cowley County in 1875. The IGI lists a sealing of William W Marquis to Hannah Dealy, 13 July 1982 OGDEN and to Hannah Draly 20 Sep 1984 BOISE.

CENSUS:
1830 Lafayette, MO p249 GSF#14854
Robert Marquis
1 male 10-15
1 male 15-20
1 male 40-50
1 female 5-10
1 female40-50

1840 Lafayette, MO p140 GSF#14856
Robert Marquis agriculture
1 male 20-30
1 male 50-60
1 female 15-20
1 female 50-60

1850 Lafayette, MO GSF#443611 28Sep1850
William S Marquis 32 MO farmer
Ruth 30 OH
Benjamin 8 MO
Thomas I 5 MO
John M 3 MO
William H 1 MO

1850 Slave Schedule, Missouri, Lafayette co, p375, dist 46 443632
W. S. Marquis
1M 43 B

1860 Jackson, MO GSF#803624 p130 Westport 26Jun1860
William S. Marquis 42 MO wagonmaker
Hannah 33 IN
Benjamin 17 MO
William H 11 MO
Sarah J 9 MO
Isaac N 6 MO
Eliza E 5 MO
Louisa E E Dealy 13 MO owns $12700 in real estate
Joseph D Marquis 27 MO (this is his nephew, son of George)
W.S. Phonias 21 NY
David Frazier 35 KY
Peter Warwick 28 VA
James Sallye 25 KY
Mary S Pearl 17 MO

1870 MO Census, Jackson Co, p 121 Lee Summit 552280 7-13-1870
W. S. Marquis 52 MO farmer
Hannah 55 IN
William 21 MO
Isaac N. 17 MO laborer
Eliza E. 15 MO

Louisa Shepherd 23 MO listed next with Abr L. Shepherd 26 VA
Sarah Marquis 19 MO listed below with G. W. Marquis 26 MO

1880 KS Soundex ED300 p13
Benjamin A. Marquis 38 MO
Tabitha A. 33 IN
Mary A 6 MO
George 10/12 KS
Evaline 61 OH relation M

1900 Oregon Census, Umatilla
Benjamin Marquis Feb 1842 MO
T.A. May 1848 IN wife
Ada Feb 1874 MO
George Jul 1879 KS
J. Alfred Apr 1881 KS

1880 Cowley, KS Richland twp ED178, S9
A.J Yarbrough 34 MO
M.E. 25 MO wife
Rosellie 4 KA dau
W. M. 2 KA son
Dora 4/12 KA dau
Hannah Marquis 65 IN ML

1900 Cowley, KS ED58 sh7 Richland GSF#1370389
A.J. Yarbrough 54 Jun1845 MO TN VA married 25yrs
E.E 45 Apr1855 MO MO IN 10kids, all living
Ira L. 18 Apr1882 KS male
Ohha P. 15 Jul1884 KS female
Stella 13 Nov1886 KS female
Mamie 10 Nov1889 KS
Russel R 9 Nov1890 KS
Floyd A 6 Oct1893 KS
Glen G 3 Nov1896 KS

1830 Ray, MO GSF#14854 p381
George Marquis
1 male 20-30
1 male 15-20

1840 Lafayette, MO p150 GSF#14856
George W. Marquis
1 male under5
1 male 5-10
1 male 30-40
1 female20-30

1850 Lafayette, MO GSF#443611 p160 26Sep1850
George W. Marquis 43 KY Wagonmaker
Mary 42 KY
Joseph D. 17 MO
James T. 13 MO
George W. 10 MO
Martha L 2 MO

1860 Jackson, MO GSF#803625 p221 mid Aug?
George W. Marquis 52 KY Wagonmaker
Mary 52 KY
James T. 25 MO

1840 Lafayette, MO p145 GSF#14856
David J Marquis (hard to read, index says David J) Manufacturing and trades
1 male 20-30
1 male under 5
1 female under 5
1 female 20-30

1860 Miller, MO p441 GSF#803633 24July1860
David J Marquis 47 KY Methodist minister
Lucy A 46 VA
Robert A 18 MO

SOURCES:
U.S.Government 1850 Census, Lafayette, Missouri , p169.
U.S.Government 1860 Census, Jackson, Missouri, p130, Westport Twp.
U.S.Government 1880 Census Mortality Schedule, Cowley, Kansas.
Missouri Genealogical Records & Abstracts, Vol. 1: 1766-1839, Sherida K. Eddleman, 1990.
U.S.Government 1830 Census, Lafayette, Missouri, p249.
U.S.Government 1840 Census, Lafayette, Missouri, p140.
Marriage records of Jackson County, Missouri 1851-1865 Vol. 2 Pg11, 977.841V25v.
U.S.Government 1850 Census, Lafayette, Missouri , p160.
U.S.Government 1860 Census, Miller, Missouri, p441.
U.S.Government 1810 Census, Madison, Kentucky, p233
U.S.Government 1830 Census, Ray, Missouri, p381.
U.S.Government 1840 Census, Lafayette, Missouri, p150.
U.S.Government 1840 Census, Lafayette, Missouri, p145.
U.S.Government 1850 Census, Lafayette, Missouri , p164.
Marriages of Madison County, Kentucky, GSF#183302.
Index of marriages in Madison County, Kentucky, GSF#851647,
Marriage records of Lafayette County, Missouri 1851-1865, p30.
Letter from Bonnie Daily, Chesterland, Ohio.
Marriage Records Of Bartholomew County Indiana, p329.
U.S.Government 1900 Census, Cowley, Kansas, ED58 p7
Probate Records Of Jackson, Missouri pp GI:82,167,284, K:364
U.S.Government 1880 Census, Reno, Kansas, ED300 p13.
U.S.Government 1900 Census, Umatilla, Oregon
Vital Historical Records of Jackson County, Missouri, 1826-1876, compiled by the Kansas City Chapter of the DAR, 1933-1934.
U.S.Government 1880 Census, Reno, Kansas, ED300 p11.
Marriage Records Of Jackson, Missouri, Book 5, Pg266.
Division of Vital Statistics, State of Kansas, Certificate of Death 318 4167.
Marriage License and certificate, State of Kansas, Cowley County.
U.S. Government 1880 Census, Cowley, Kansas, ED178, Sh9.
Marriage License and certificate, State of Kansas, Cowley County.
Letter from Cowley County Genealogical Society, 2 April 1995.
Early day Residents, Cowley County, Kansas, 978.189 X2m V2.
Marriage License, Greenwood County, Kansas, Book 8, p81. Also 978.1913 V28h.

SEALED TO SPOUSE:
IGI; 13 Jul 1982, OGDEN, listed as William W. Marquis;
20 Sep 1984, BOISE. listed as Hannah Draly

[NI0355] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Hannah Rhoads (Rhodes)
Prepared by Brent Haroldsen
1251 Sprague Street, Manteca, California
January, 1999

Birth: Sources all disagree on her birth date. On the 1850 Census she is listed as Hannah Daly age as 34 (1816). The 1860 census lists Hannah Marquis, age 33 (1827). Despite the discrepancy in age, this appears to be the same person because a daughter, Louise Dealy/Daly, appears with her in both censuses even though she remarried. We can not find the family in 1870. In the 1880 and 1900 Censuses she lived with her daughter, Emma Yarbrough. In 1880 she was listed as age 65 (1815). The 1900 Census lists birth as Dec 1810 and age as 89. The 1820 Census lists two females under 10. Only one was still there in 1830 and she was between 15 and 20. In 1840, she was between 20 and 30. All censuses agree that she was born in Indiana. I infer that she was born in Jefferson County from the fact that her father lived there in 1820 and 1830.

Parents: Circumstantial evidence suggests that Hannah's father was Jacob Rhoads. She was married in Bartholomew County, Indiana in 1842. In the 1840 census, Jacob was the only Rhoads in the county. Jacob's wife was named Esther. In 1880 she lived with Hannah's brother Jehial Alfred Rhoads. Hannah had a daughter named Esther. The 1900 Census says that Hannah's father and mother were both born in Pennsylvania. The 1850 Census says Jacob was born in Pennsylvania, but that Esther was born in New York. However, the 1880 Census says she was born in Pennsylvania and the 1860 Census says New Jersey. Jacob Rhoads' will refers to his "natural children", but does not name them. We have found no record listing Esther's maiden name.

Marriage: Hannah's first spouse was James S. Dealy/Daily/Dailey whom she married in Bartholomew County, Indiana on 31 March 1842. The marriage record says James Dudley and Hannah Rhoads. However, the license issued on 29 March lists James Dealy and Hannah Rhoads. Dealy is correct. James was the son of William N. Dealy who lived in Decatur County, Indiana. At different times between 1842 and 1852 James, his father, and several siblings moved to Jackson County Missouri. James and Hannah are on the 1850 Census in Jackson County along with brothers Thomas and William. James died intestate in 1852. His probate was dated 29 May 1852. We cannot find William Dealy on the 1850 Census, but he also died intestate in Jackson County, Missouri. His probate was dated 2 May 1852. Among his heirs are "the heirs of James S. Dealy, dec'd" so James was already dead. It also lists his other children living in Missouri, Indiana, and Kentucky. Family tradition says that William Dealy died of cholera. Since William and James died at about the same time, it is possible that James died of cholera also.

After the death of James, Hannah married William S. Marquis on 27 March 1853 in Jackson County, Missouri. She was listed as Hannah Dealy on the marriage record. William Marquis lived in Lafayette County, Missouri. He was previously married to Ruth Whitaker. William had a child in 1851 (age 9 on 1860 census) so Ruth apparently died around 1851/1852, perhaps in childbirth. See notes on William Marquis for more information about him.

Children: The 1900 census says that Hannah had four children with two still living. The 1850 Census listing for James and Hannah Dealy has one child, Louisa E. Dealy. She is also on the 1860 census with William Marquis. The 1860 census also lists children from William's first marriage as well as two children that were born after William and Hannah were married. These two, Isaac and Emma (listed as Eliza E. in the 1860 Census), are presumably Hannah's children. The abstract of James Dealy's probate record lists his heirs as "Louisa, Elizabeth and Esther Dailey, all living in Jackson Co., MO." This sounds like three people, which would give Hannah five children instead of four. There is no Elizabeth or Esther on the 1850 Census with James and Hannah Dealy or on the 1860 Census with William and Hannah Marquis. Since Hannah had only four children and Louisa's middle initial was E., I suspect that Louisa Elizabeth was one person and Esther was another. However, some records, including the 1860 census, list Louisa E. E. Dealy so she could be Louisa Elizabeth Esther Dealy and the fourth child could be someone entirely different. I need to examine the probate record instead of the abstracts.

According to Jackson County cemetery records Louisa E. Dealy was 26 years and 26 days old when she died on 29 January 1873. That would make her birth on 3 January 1847. This is consistent with the 1860 Census that lists her age as 13 when the census was taken in June. It is inconsistent with the 1850 Census that lists her as age as 4. She married Abraham Sheppard 22 December 1867 in Jackson County, Missouri. She was buried in Adams Cemetery in Jackson County, Missouri. She was listed as a member of the Lone Jack Church of Christ in June 1859 .

Assuming Esther was another child, she would have been born after the 1850 Census was taken (about September 1850 although I have not recorded the exact date), but before James Dealy's probate record was filed on 29 May 1852. She would have died after 29 May 1852, but before the 1860 Census was taken on 26 June 1860.

I believe Isaac Newton Marquis was born 27 December 1853 although sources disagree. He married Cordelia Alice Sherman. He is documented in a separate package of notes. Emma Elizabeth Marquis was born 29 April 1855 in Jackson County, Missouri and died 29 November 1943 in Winfield, Cowley County, Kansas. She married Andrew J. Yarbrough on 21 April 1875 in Cowley County, Kansas and had 10 kids. In the 1860 census she was listed as Eliza E. Marquis. The 1880 census lists her as M.E. Yarbrough and the 1900 census lists her as E.E. Yarbrough. Her death certificate lists her as Emma Elizabeth. Her marriage license had Eliza E. Marquis, but Eliza was crossed out and Emma was written over it in a different handwriting. Emma Marquis was listed as a member of the Lone Jack Church in August 1860.

Death: She died 9 April 1902 in Salem Township, Cowley County, Kansas and was buried there at Floral Cemetery. She was living with her daughter Emma Yarbrough.

Other: Hannah Marquis was listed as a member of the Lone Jack Church on 24 July 1854. We cannot find the family in the 1870 census. William Marquis' daughter, Sarah, was married in Jackson County, Missouri in 1871, which would suggest they were still in Missouri. The family moved to Cowley County, Kansas where William and Hannah were listed as early settlers in 1874. They were both listed as age 50. The same source lists Hannah there in 1878, age 66, but does not list William. Their son Isaac married in Greenwood County, Kansas in 1874. He was living in Cowley County at the time. The IGI lists a sealing of William W Marquis to Hannah Dealy, 13 July 1982 OGDEN and to Hannah Draly 20 Sep 1984 BOISE.

There were two Dealy/ Dailey families in Jackson County, Missouri around 1850 and 1860. Several names were common to the two families including James, Hannah, William, and David. This can lead to some confusion. The first family consists of David Dealy and his children. David was one of the first settlers to arrive in Jackson County. He had 27 children. He came from North Carolina. The other family consisted of William Dealy and his children. They went from Kentucky to Indiana between 1830 and 1832 then on to Missouri between 1842 and 1852. James, the son of William and spouse of Hannah Rhoads, arrived in Missouri between 1842, when he was married in Indiana, and 1847, when his daughter was born in Missouri. James, the son of David left Missouri for California before 1850. Consequently, they are never on the same census. Hannah Dealy, nee Rhoads married William Marquis in 1853 while Hannah Dealy, the daughter of David, married Jacob Phelps in 1847.

CENSUS:
1820 Jefferson, IN p286 GSF#205609
Jacob Rhods
3m under102f under10
1m 10-16 1f 26-45
1m 26-45

1830 Jefferson, IN p86 GSF#7717
Jacob Rhods
2m 10-15 1f under5
1m 15-20 1f 5-10
1m 20-30 1f 15-20
1m 40-50 1f 30-40

1840 Bartholomew, IN p165 GSF#7722
Jacob Rhodes
1m under5 1f 10-15
1m 5-10 1f 15-20
1m 50-60 1f 20-30
1f 40-50

1850 Jackson, MO 977.8111 p695
James Daly 37 KY
Hannah 34 IN
Louisa E. 4 MO

1850 Bartholomew, IN p454 GSF#7749
Jacob Rhods 69 PA postmaster
Ester 58 NY
Alfred 20 IN
Henry H 13 IN

1860 Jackson, MO GSF#803624 p130 Westport 26Jun1860
William S. Marquis 42 MO wagonmaker
Hannah 33 IN
Benjamin 17 MO
William H 11 MO
Sarah J 9 MO
Isaac N 6 MO
Eliza E 5 MO
Louisa E E Dealy 13or18 MO owns $12700 in real estate
Joseph D Marquis 27 MO(this is his nephew, son of George)
W.S. Phonias 21 NY
David Frazier 35 KY
Peter Warwick 28 VA
James Sallye 25 KY
Mary S Pearl 17 MO

1860 Bartholomew, IN p51
Esther Rhoads 69 NJ
next family is Henry Rhoads

1880 Cowley, KS Richland twp ED178, S9
A.J Yarbrough 34 MO
M.E. 25 MO wife
Rosellie 4 KA dau
W. M. 2 KA son
Dora 4/12 KA dau
Hannah Marquis 65 IN BL

1880 Greenwood, KS Twin Groves twp, ED100 sh6 ln10 Soundex
J. A. Rhodes 49 IN
M. J. 43 IN
John A. 10 IN
Adolphus O. 8 KS
Ester 93 PA

1900 Cowley, KS ED58 sh7 Richland GSF#1370389
A.J. Yarbrough 54 Jun1845 MO TN VA married 25yrs
E.E 45 Apr1855 MO MO IN 10kids, all living
Ira L. 18 Apr1882 KS male
Ohha P. 15 Jul1884 KS female
Stella 13 Nov1886 KS female
Mamie 10 Nov1889 KS
Russel R 9 Nov1890 KS
Floyd A 6 Oct1893 KS
Glen G 3 Nov1896 KS
Hannah Marquis 89 Dec 1810 IN PA PA widowed, motherinlaw, 4 kids,2 alive

There is a George W Rhodes, age 36, in Jackson, MO in 1850. Could be
brother.

SOURCES:
U.S. Government 1850 Census, Jackson, Missouri, p695, 977.8111.
U.S.Government 1860 Census, Jackson, Missouri, p130, Westport Twp.
U.S. Government 1880 Census, Cowley, Kansas, ED178, Sh9.
U.S.Government 1900 Census, Cowley, Kansas, ED58 p7.
U.S.Government 1820 Census, Jefferson, Indiana, p286 GSF#205609.
U.S.Government 1830 Census, Jefferson, Indiana, p86 GSF#7717.
U.S.Government 1840 Census, Bartholomew, Indiana, p165 GSF#7722.
U.S.Government 1850 Census, Bartholomew, Indiana, p454 GSF#7749.
U.S.Government 1880 Census, Greenwood, Kansas, Twin Groves twp, ED100 sh6 ln10.
Missouri Pioneers of Jackson County, Abstracts of Wills & Administrations, p42,81 (GI:82,167,284, K:364).
U.S.Government 1860 Census, Bartholomew, Indiana, p51.
Bartholomew, Indiana Wills, GSF#1301617, Will Book A, pp244-5, recorded 20 November 1856.
Marriage Records Of Bartholomew County Indiana, p330.
Marriage Records Of Bartholomew County Indiana, p329.
U.S.Government 1840 Census, Decatur, Indiana, p401.
U.S. Government 1850 Census, Jackson, Missouri, p705, 977.8111.
U.S. Government 1850 Census, Jackson, Missouri, p694, 977.8111.
Missouri Pioneers of Jackson County, Abstracts of Wills & Administrations, p42 (GI:81).
Letter from Bonnie Daily, Chesterland, Ohio.
Marriage records of Jackson County, Missouri 1851-1865 Vol. 2 Pg11, 977.841V25v.
U.S.Government 1850 Census, Lafayette, Missouri , p169.
Marriage records of Lafayette County, Missouri 1851-1865, p30.
Notes on William S. Marquis written by Brent Haroldsen, December 1998.
Cemeteries of Jackson County, Missouri, 977.841 V3br p85.
Marriage Records Of Jackson, Missouri, Book 5, Pg287.
Vital Historical Records of Jackson County, Missouri, 1826-1876, compiled by the Kansas City Chapter of the DAR, 1933-1934.
Notes on Isaac Newton Marquis written by Brent Haroldsen, November 1998.
Division of Vital Statistics, State of Kansas, Certificate of Death 318 4167.
Marriage License and certificate, State of Kansas, Cowley County.
Letter from Cowley County Genealogical Society, 2 April 1995.
Early day Residents, Cowley County, Kansas, 978.189 X2m V2.
Marriage License, Greenwood County, Kansas, Book 8, p81. Also 978.1913 V28h.
The History of Jackson County, Missouri, Union Historical Company, Birdsall, Williams, and Co., 1881
Letter from ???.
Marriage Records Of Jackson, Missouri, V1, 1827-1850.

[NI0356] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P233
Title: 1810 Census Madison, Kentucky
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P249
Title: 1830 Census Lafayette, Missouri
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P140
Title: 1840 Census Lafayette, Missouri
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P164
Date: 26 Sep 1850
Title: 1850 Census, Lafayette, Missouri
Author: U.S. Government

!I have no proof that he is William's father. He is on the 1817 tax list for Howard County, Missouri the year before William was born. Howard split into Cooper in 1818 and then into Lafayette in 1820. In 1830 he is in Lafayette Co, MO with three kids: male 1810-1815, male 1815-1820, female 1820-1825. In 1840 he is still in Lafayette Co but oldest child is gone. David Marquis is listed in Lafayette Co for the first time, age 20 - 30. In 1850 he is still in Lafayette Co but only the daughter is listed. William appears for the first time. Robert is 64 in 1850. Place of birth is hard to read but I think it says PA. Does not appear on 1860 census in Missouri. Robert Marquis is listed on 1817 taxpayer list for Howard Co, MO. David's birth place is KY on 1870 Census. The 1810 KY Census lists Robert Marquis in Madison county. Marriage records of Madison Co lists marriage to Lavinah (listed as Savanah in one index). See notes on Lavina. GSF#851647 which is a compiled index, lists marriage date as 14 Sept while GSF#183302 lists 23 Sept. In 1810 census of Madison Co, KY it lists a male and a female under 10. The male is probably George who is listed in Lafayette Co, MO in 1830 census along with Robert. Don't know who the female is; probably an older daughter. It also lists a male 16 to 26 which would be him and 2 females 16 to 26. One would be spouse. The other is probably a sister. Lists a male over 45 that could be his father and a female 26 to 45 that could be his mother. There are no Marquis's on PA tax lists for 1790 or 1800. Quite a few in 1810 but George (Robert's father) was in Ky by 1795. GSF#8126 KY taxpayer list first shows a male, 16 to 21, living with George in 1803. This is consistent with Robert's age from the 1850 census and suggests that he is the oldest son. Robert is first listed as head of house in 1808 (1807 is very hard to read). He is last listed in 1811 suggesting they left for Missouri. They may have stopped in Indiana on the way. There is a land record for Robert Marquis in Jefferson County Indiana on May 28 1817 which would have been the last of 3 one-year payments. John Marquis got land in December 1819. He stayed there and lived next door to Jacob Rhodes in 1820. Samuel Marquis got land in 1816 and Samuel and Catherine sold land in 1816 to George Green of Kentucky. The exact birthdate came from Helen Cooper, a ggg-daughter. It is consistent with the 1850 census. The notes from Helen Cooper say: "1819 Robert settled at Lexington, Mo. 1822 James Thorp and Rebecca his wife sold 100 acres in Lexington, MO to Robert Marquis. My mother said they were kin but she didn't know how. I think she could have been Robert's sister."
CENSUS:

1810 Madison, KY p233
1m under10 1f under10
1m 16-26 2f 16-26
1m over45 1f 26-45

1830 Lafayette, MO p249 GSF#14854
Robert Marquis
1m 10-15 1f 5-10
1m 15-20
1m 40-50 1f40-50

1840 Lafayette, MO p140 GSF#14856
Robert Marquis agriculture
1m 20-30 1f 15-20
1m 50-60 1f 50-60

1850 Lafayette, MO p164 GSF#443611 26Sep1850
Robert Marquis 64 PA farmer
Levina 64 MO
Mary M 23 MO

[NI0357] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

See notes on Robert Marquis. Joined Lone Jack Church 1 May 1859. Marriage record lists father. GSF#851647, index of marriages in Madison Co, KY lists Savanah Jones and gives father. GSF#183302 lists Lavinah. Although the L looks like an S it is clearly different than the S in September on the same line and looks like other L's on the page. One the same day she joined the Lone Jack church, Permelia Ellis joined. Permelia also joined on the same day as Geo W and Mary Marquis. This suggests she is related. There is also a Permela Duncan and Lavena Shepherd in the Pleasant Grove Baptist church, 977.841 V2d p29. Maybe Permelia was Mary Duncan's sister or sister in law. No idea who Lavena Shepherd was. Maybe the daughter of Robert listed in 1810.

Subsequently, on 25 November 1902 Susan B. Jones of Covington, Louisiana, an unmarried daughter of Jesse R. Jones, wrote to her cousin Clara Jones in Crystal Springs, Mississippi (Photocopy of original letter from Juanita Sigmon Halstead, Scott Depot, WV, 1995):
Covington Nov 25th 1902
My dear Cousin
We received your letter and we were very glad to hear from you, as it had been a long time since we had done so. For the last twelve years, Serena and I have lived alone in the old home in Covington, and we only go to New Orleans two or three times a year, for a week or two at a time. We look on it now as quite a journey. All three of our nephews, James, Frank and Charlie are dead, but our two nieces, Arsine and Laura live in Covington, not far from us. After the death of our brother James, with whom they lived on a farm four miles from here, they moved into Covington. James (or Boy as he was always called) left two sons, Frank, the oldest, and Charlie, who lives with his aunts, Arsine and Laura, and is a very fine young man. Poor Frank is a hopeless invalid, an incurable disease of the spine which has paralyzed his lower limbs. He is now at Hot Springs, Ark. and the Doctors say that he may die at any time, or he may live for some months.
As to our relations, we regret that we did not write down what my Father used to tell us about them, for I am afraid that we cannot tell you much more than you already know. My Father's great, great grandfather came from Wales early in 1700 and settled near Winchester, Virginia. Pa remembered his great grandfather, and great grandmother (who were then more than ninety years old) and used to tell him anecdotes of their childhood in Wales. Afterwards Pa's grandfather moved to Franklin County, Virginia, near the little town of Rocky Mount, where Pa was born and some of his nine sisters. In 1795 Grandfather Jones moved (and a number of his neighbors) to Madison County, Ken - in the Bluegrass region. When my grandfather moved to Ken - he sold the farm in Virginia to a Mr. Saunders, whose descendants still own and live on it. When we were at one of the Virginia Springs in 1859, Pa rode over to see the old place. Pa removed with his father to Ken. and was educated there until he was twenty one (1808) then his health was delicate, and he was advised to come to a warmer climate. he came to Miss. near Natchez, where he remained three years. Then he moved to Covington in 1811, and began to practice law. Afterwards, Grandfather Jones moved (I do not know in what year) to Missouri, with his nine daughters, and Uncle Robert, who I think was born in Ken - Pa's mother was named Jane Ruble and her father had a farm in the same neighborhood in Virginia. As Pa never had any of the Family records, we do not know the names of the any of the wives of the different ancestors, except I think, one was named Van Meter. Pa had a copy of Blackstone, one of the first edition ever published in the United States, which was given to Grandfather Jones by one of his ancestors, to whom it belonged (Alexander White who was a member of the first Continental Congress, which ratified the Declaration of Independence). The names of our Aunts were Rebecca - Anna - Elizabeth - Martha - Helena - Margaret - Lavinia - Lydia and Jane. The married names were Rebecca Bingham - Anna Reid - Ferrell - Turley - Helena McMahon (and another married a McMahon) Thorpe - Lydia Allison and Jane Jones, (the Jones she married was no relation). I think Uncle Robert was one of the younger children. Pa used to receive letters occasionally from his surviving sisters, until the war interrupted the intercourse. He heard, however, that all of his nephews, who were of a suitable age, were in the Confederate army, which gratified him very much, as you know Missouri was so divided. At one time a cousin of Pa's (Dr. Josiah Hale) was Professor of Botany in the Medical College in New Orleans. He was a very scientific man, and a very nice old gentleman, but he died a year or two before the war. He was a celebrated botanist, and we often see his opinion quoted as an authority. I am sorry to say that we cannot tell you anything about the Robertsons, except that we have heard Ma say that her sister Serena was only fourteen years old, when she married Nathaniel Robertson in Georgia. Grandfather Ragan lived on a farm, and had a flour mill also, near Milledgeville, but moved his Family to Mississippi, (I think about 1814) Covington County. We send you a picture of my Father. I am sorry that we have no better one. He never took well, and always disliked to sit for his picture. We would send you one of ours, if we had one, but we have had none taken for thirty five years, and those were all given away at the time. In the summer, sometime, cannot you and Cousin Lizzie pay us a visit. We should be very glad to see you. The pine woods in winter look very bare and desolate, but in summer the country looks more attractive, and then too the trains arrive here before dark. When you come, write to us a few days before, and we will meet you at the train. Serena joins me in love to you, Cousin Lizzie and the children.
Your affectionate Cousin
Susan B. Jones

Another letter about the Jones Family was written to Miss Clara Jones in 1902 from Mrs. Louise J. B. Neff of Hardeman, Missouri (Photocopy of original letter from Juanita Sigmon Halstead, Scott Depot, WV, 1995):
Hardeman, Saline County, Mo. October 13, 1902.
Miss Clara Jones;
Dear Cousin,
Please pardon my tardiness in replying to your letter. It was received just after I moved back to the farm. I had to do my packing hurriedly and moved in bad weather.
The farm had been rented over nine years, therefore, I found much hard work to do after getting here.
The overwork caused me to have very severe attacks of headache - averaging one a week all season. It is difficult to get help here and my daughter and I have done all of our house work and the washing, too, most of the season.
I have had a gentleman - a cousin in poor health - staying with us 'till last week.
I am sorry I have so little information to give you.
My mother, Lamenda McMahan Bingham, she, the daughter of Margaret Jones McMahan, the latter a sister of your grandfather Dr. Robert Jones.
Margaret Jones married Thomas McMahan.
The sisters of Margaret Jones McMahan were all married, lived and died in Missouri, except one, perhaps; I give them on next page but not in rotation according to age.
Melvina Jones - Marcus
Betsy Jones - Turley
Annie Jones - Reed
Patsy Jones - Ferril
Lydia Jones - Allison
Helena Jones - McMahon
Rebecca Jones - Thorpe
Jane Jones - Jones
They were all considered remarkably intelligent women.
There is a son of Aunt Melvina Marcus - a methodist [sic] preacher - his name is David Marcus; he is in Missouri, I think; he being a son of the oldest daughter, may by reason of his student life remember some more than others. Your Aunt Mary might find him through her methodist [sic] friends.
I have not seen him since I was a child.
There is another Cousin Anna Reed McMahon, I wish to see; she has an excellent memory and being one of her mother's oldest children may remember some things from what her grandmother Annie Jones Reed may have told her.
Cousin Adelia Turley - Herndon says great grandfather David Jones was a colonel under Gen. Washington. She remembers his epulets [sic] and sword and of his telling of his days as a soldier.
After his death his effects were sold and her elder brother, Dr. Jesse Turley bought the sword but she does not remember ever seeing it after our civil war.
All of Dr. Turley's Family are dead except one son, which I'll try to find him.
I can not tell you anything about your great-great grandfather Owen Ruble.
There was an Owen Ruble lived and died here; he was a brother of great grandmother - Ruble - Jones, I think. I do not know what great grandmother [sic] first name was. She had a brother who was quite a noted physician in those days. She must have studied under him as she was quite well informed in medicine.
Some time I should like a copy of the letter written to your father by Uncle Jesse Jones; you say it contains considerable Family history. My mother was named for his first wife. Too late in life I began to take a genuine interest in our Family history. Those who could have informed me are dead. There was a David Thorpe, the only child of Aunt Rebecca Jones Thorpe. He did live in Platte County, Mo. He was very intelligent. If living he is quite old; I should like to find him.
I hope some time you may come to see us in Missouri. Give my love to Cousin Rosa. I think I wrote the last letter but presume she lost patience with my tardy answers. I hope she and you, too, have better health than I have ever had.
Would the muster roles [sic] be in Philadelphia? I shall be glad to hear from you again. I'm not always so tardy. Besides a member of the Bingham Family had written for Family history which I had just finished - twenty seven pages - when your letter came.
Yours sincerely,
Louise J. B. Neff

Notations in another handwriting on the original photocopy state that the writer was a daughter of Samanda (sic) McMahan Bingham, who was a daughter of Margaret Jones McMahan, who was a sister of Robert Jones of Utica, Mississippi, and Jesse Ruble Jones of Covington, Louisiana.

There are two discrepancies in the lists of daughters of David Jones and Jane Ruble. The list of Susan Jones included one named Lavinia and gave the married name of Rebecca as Bingham. Louise Neff named Melvina Jones Marcus, as the eldest, and did not list a sister named Lavinia. Since Mrs. Neff was closer to the sisters, all of whom resided in Missouri, it seems likely that one was named Melvina, not Lavinia. The Neff list also gives the married name of Rebecca Jones as Thorpe, instead of Bingham, and identified her as the mother of David Thorpe, which indicates that Susan Jones was in error in giving Bingham as the married name of Rebecca Jones. Since Louise Neff's father was a Bingham, it is likely that she would have mentioned a marriage by Rebecca to a Bingham, if one had occurred.

[NI0359] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Vol.2439 #8879
Title: Death Certificate, State Of Florida
Author: Office Of Vital Statistics, State Board Of Health
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: 1880 Census, Elk, Kansas
Author: U.S.Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED171 Sh12
Citation Comments: It says Frank, but the data fits William and Frank is listed
separately.
Title: 1900 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED202 Sh11
Date: 26 Apr 1910
Title: 1910 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED143 Sh14
Date: 12 Jan 1920
Title: 1920 Census, Palm Beach, Florida
Author: U.S. Government

!Donna's mom called him Uncle Ed.
BIRTH: Death certificate says he was born in Kansas City, Missouri. Social Security application, filed in Florida in 1937 says Winfield, Kansas which is in Cowley County. In 1880 Census, they were in Elk County Kansas. MARRIAGE: Family records say Naomi, whom Donna knew. Apparently they raised Billy after his mom died. Naomi was considerably younger than William. 1920 census lists William and Hazel living with Issac Marquis and says Hazel is a daughter-in-law, apparently William's wife. He was single in 1900 and 1910. Donna says there were two kids, Robert and Dorothy. Don't know which marriage they were from. Florida marriage records show a marriage of Robert Marguis in 1940. There are two marriages of Dorothy Marquis in 1943 and 1945. Donna's mom says he married Hazel in Kansas.

Palm Beach Post, Thursday, February 14, 1963, page 2
William (Ed) Marquis
Mr. Marquis, 83, of 1237 Roebuck Ct., city, died Wednesday at his home following an extended illness.
He moved to West Palm Beach 34 years ago. Prior to moving here he lived at Pahokee and Canal Point. He was a boilermaker and steam fitter and retired four years ago.
Survivors include his widow, Mrs. Neoma R. Marquis, city; one son, Robert L., city; a daughter, Mrs. Dorothy Lowe, Punta Gorda, and four grandchildren.
Graveside services will be at 4 p.m. Friday at Hillcrest memorial Park, with a Christian Science reader officiating.
Friends may call from 5 to 9 p.m. today at Mizell-Faville-Zern Hibiscus Street Chapel.West Palm Beach, FL August 1953 from Obituary

[NI0369] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Pg214
Title: 1850 Census Jefferson, Indiana
Publication Information: GSF#442932

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Probate Records Of Jefferson, Indiana
Source Comments: The will was written on 28 May 1867 and it was presented on 20 Jun
1867 where it refers to the late Moses Rogers.

!1850 Census, Jefferson CO, IN, p210; Marriage record of Jefferson
Co. IN p161. Not listed on 1860 census with spouse, but she has 2
month old child. Probate records for Nathaniel Sherman list him as
heir as late as 29 Sep 1862. Sharon Weaver of Fort Wayne Indiana (a
descendant of Orin through Ezra) says he drowned in the Ohio River,
gives his death date and refers to a newspaper article about him.
Madison Courier - Local Matters, 1860 April 9, Monday evening: Dr.
P. Hill, Coroner of Jefferson Co., gives the following description
of a man found dead in the Ohio River at Madison, April 8th, 1860.
To wit: from 30 to 35 years of age, about 5 ft. 6 in. high, black
hair and fair complexion, had one calico and one flannel shirt,
black woolen pants, cotton socks and course shoes.
1860 June 13, IN Census-Mortality list-Milton Twp. Orrin Shearman-28
m.-b. Ind- April- Laborer-drowned.
Ellen Gayle Layton lists place of birth as Milton Twp, Jefferson, IN

[NI0370] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Obituary Of Mary Jane Sherman
Publication Information: Severyite
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca, Ca 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Obituary Of Mary Jane Sherman
Publication Information: Severyite
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca, Ca 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Pg214
Title: 1850 Census Jefferson, Indiana
Publication Information: GSF#442932

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Pg414
Title: 1860 Census, Jefferson, Indiana
Author: U.S. Government
Publication Information: GSF#803270

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED100 Sh 6 Twin Grove
Title: 1880 Census Greenwood, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government

!1860 census of Jefferson Co, IN lists Mary Shearman as mother of
Belia, age two, no husband, living with her parents, Moses and Ann
Rogers. Marriage records show Mary Jane Rogers married Orran
Sherman. Other children are Ezra 5, Ann 3, Margaret 2 months. Not
sure if he is dead or not. He is still listed as heir in Nathaniel
Sherman's probate records as late as 1861. Mary J. Sherman was
baptized into Milton Baptist Church along with Mariah Rodgers on 3rd
Sat in Oct 1866, Jefferson, IN 977.213M2kr2 p152-3. Other members of
family were members. Mary J Sherman married Jehial A Rhoads,
GSF#549400. He was Hannah's brother. In 1880 census, M.J. Rhodes, 43
and J.A. Rhodes live with Ester, 93, who is Hannah's mother. Isaac
Marquis was married in the same county. Mary Sherman was a member of
the Milton Baptist Church in 1867.
OBITUARY sent by Greenwood Genealogy Society, paper unknown:
Died--At her home two and one-half miles northwest of Severy, March
19, 1893 Mary Jane Rhoads, aged nearly 56 years.
Mary Jane Rogers was born in Jefferson county Indiana in 1837. She
was married to her second husband, Mr. J.A. Rhoads in 1869 and
removed to Kansas 21 years ago where she remained until her death
She leaves four children by name of Sherman by her first husband,
and two boys by her second husband Funeral services were held at the
Congregational church Sunday afternoon, March 19th after which the
remains were interred in Twin Groves Cemetery. The husband and
children have the heartfelt sympathy of all in their sad bereavement.
CENSUS:
1860 Jefferson, IN p414 GSF#803207
Mary Shearman 23 IN male(sic)
Ezra 5 IN
Ann 3 IN
Belia 2 IN
Margaret 2/12 IN
living with Moses Rogers.
1880 Greenwood, KS ED100 sh6 ln10 twin groves twp
Rhodes, J.A. 49 IN
M.J. 43 IN
John A 10 IN
Adolphus O 8 KS
Ester 93 PA

[NI0371] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

He is the only Rhodes in Bartholomew Co. IN in 1840, p165; Listed as Jacob Rhods in 1850 index, p454; Bartholomew Co. wills Book A pp. 244-5, dated 21 Feb, 1854, recorded 20 Nov, 1856, lists wife as Esther, refers to natural children, 977.2 P22f. GSF#1513827 Cemeteries of Bartholomew, IN lists birth and death dates and him and his wife, spelled Rhoads. Also H.H. Rhodes. Two stones, older one with him, newer with him and her. No Rhodes in the 1807 Indiana Territorial census. In 1820 he is next door to John Marquis. John Marquis was born 28 Dec 1793 in PA and died 17 Apr 1871. There is another Jacob Roads in Clark, IN in 1820, over 45. A Jacob Rodes Witnesses the will of John colvil in Frederick, VA in 1802/1803. One of the daughters is probably Emeline (Emerine) who married Henry H. Crist 13 Nov 1850 in Bartholomew County. They are on the 1870 census on the page after Henry Rhoads. Children: Mary, 19, William, 11, and Edward, 4. pg 3 ln 36, Bartholomew, IN. Other daughters could be Mary who married Stephen Stites on 9 Sep 1841 in Jefferson County, Rachel who married George Leichtman on 3 Oct 1858 in Bartholomew County, and Sarah Ann who married Peter H Lawless on 5 Jan 1854 in Bartholomew. Sons could be John who married Henrietta Walker on 10 Sep 1840 in Jefferson County, John who married Lucy Edwards on 14 Dec 1833 in Bartholomew, Joseph E who married Catherine Jones 21 Feb 1860 in Bartholomew, Nelson who married Mathilda Crawford 13 Feb 1834 in Jefferson, Peter who married Ester S McCasland 5 Sep 1850 in Jefferson, or William who married Polly Heath 14 Jan 1836 in Jefferson. I would guess John, Nelson, and William in Jefferson County.

CENSUS:
1820 Jefferson, IN p286 GSF#205609
Jacob Rhods
3m under10 2f under10
1m 10-16 1f 26-45
1m 26-45

1830 Jefferson, IN p86 GSF#7717
Jacob Rhods
2m 10-15 1f under5
1m 15-20 1f 5-10
1m 20-30 1f 15-20
1m 40-50 1f 30-40

1840 Bartholomew, IN p165 GSF#7722
Jacob Rhodes
1m under5 1f 10-15
1m 5-10 1f 15-20
1m 50-60 1f 20-30
1f 40-50

1850 Bartholomew, IN p454 GSF#7749
Jacob Rhods 69 PA postmaster
Ester 58 NY
Alfred 20 IN
Henry H 13 IN

[NI0372] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

BIRTH: 1860 Census, Bartholomew Co., IN, p51, lists age as 69. 1850
Census, p454 gives age as 58 on 28 Nov. Gravemarker lists date
listed on group sheet. She was living in KS in 1880. Not clear if
she was buried in IN or if there was just a gravemarker placed on
her husbands grave listing her death.

CENSUS:
1860 Bartholomew, IN p51
Esther Rhoads 69 NJ
next family is Henry Rhoads

1880 Greenwood, KS Twin Groves twp, ED100 sh6 ln10 Soundex
J. A. Rhodes 49 IN
M. J. 43 IN
John A. 10 IN
Adolphus O. 8 KS
Ester 93 PA

[NI0374] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

1850 census Jefferson Co, IN. p210. Probate records of Jefferson
Co., IN Book N, p141, 1860-1869. Will is in Will Book A, p129,
GSF#1310220; says he has 9 kids. Probate also in Book M. pp 182,229,
and 322, GSF#1310231. IGI list marriage of Nathaniel Sherman and
Abigail S Wing in Westport, Bristol, MA 26 Oct 1806. There are at
least 5 Nathaniel Shermans on the IGI born between 1778 and 1785 in
RI, MA, or NY. The marriage to Abigail Winger was sealed 25 Oct
1951. There is a William Sherman on the same page in the 1850
census. Sharon K Weaver lists another child by the name of Harriett
Sherman, but has no information. She says he is in the 1810 census
for Onodaga Co., NY, p45. Ellen Gayle Layton list death as 18 May,
1858 in Milton Twp. Farmer.

CENSUS:
1830 Jefferson, IN p125 GSF#7717
2m under5 1f under5 (Peter, Amanda, and Nathaniel?)
1m 5-10 1f 5-10 (Joseph and Margaret?)
1m 10-15 (Benjamin)
1m 20-30 (Alonzo?)
1m 30-40 1f 40-50

1850 Jefferson, IN p210 (household 210?) GSF#442932
Nathaniel Sherman 67 RI
Abigail 60 MA
Joseph 28 IN
Peter 21 IN
Amanda 23 IN
Orrin 18 IN
William 16 IN
Sarah 5 IN
1810 Onodaga, NY p45 ( I have not checked this)
1 male 10-16 2 female under 10
1 male 16-26 1 female 10-16
1 male 45-60

The Hoosier Journal of ancestry list a land purchase for Nathaniel
Sherman in Jefferson, IN in 1821.
Probate book N pg141, final settlement, 14 Mar 1861 lists:
Benjamin F., Alonzo, Garner, Peter, William, Amanda, Joseph, Orrin,
and Margaret. Pg430, 13-29 Sep 1862 lists receipts from Joseph,
Alonzo, Amanda, Orin, William, Gardner, Benjamin, Peter, and
Margaret Choat. Book M pg 322 lists Nathaniel G and does not list
Garner. Also lists Margaret Shate (hard to read). Others are the same.

Will Records of Jefferson Co, In 0850422
Nathaniel Sherman A 1-29
May 6, 1858 May 2, 1859
Land in Milton twp to my wife (not named) then to my 9 children (not named)

Will of Nathaniel Sherman, found in Jefferson County, Indiana Will Book A, p 129 GSF#1310220
In the name of the Benevolent Father of all I Nathaniel Sherman of the County of Jefferson and the State of Indiana do make and publish this my last will and testament. I give and devise to my wife the farm on which I now reside situated in Milton Township Jefferson County Indiana containing about one hundred and thirty two acres during her natural life, and all the stock household goods, furniture, Provisions, and other chattels which may be thereon at the time of my decease during her natural life as aforesaid. She however selling so much thereof as may be sufficient to pay all my just debts, and at the death of my wife the real estate aforesaid and such part of the said personal property or the proceeds thereof as then may remain unconsumed and unexpended I give and devise to my sons and daughters these being nine in numbers all an equal proportion. In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this the 6t day of May 1858.
Nathaniel Sherman (seal)
Signed and acknowledged by said Nathaniel Sherman as his last will and testament, in our presence and signed by us in his presence
S.B. Sherman (seal)
Elias McKay (seal)
In the State of Indiana, Jefferson County: On this day appeared in open court Elias McKay one of the subscribing witnesses to the last will & testament of Nathaniel Sherman late of said county deceased, who being duly sworn on his oath saith he saw the said Nathaniel Sherman sign and seal the foregoing paper as his last will and that he with Shedar B Sherman subscribed the same as witnesses in the presence of each other and in the presence and at the request of said Nathaniel Sherman: this deponent further saith said Nathaniel Sherman died on the 17 or 18 day of May 1858 and was at the time of making and executing said paper as his last will, of full age to devise his property and of sound mind and memory and not under coercion and restraint and that he did publish and declare the same to be his last will and further saith not. Elias McKay
Subscribed and sworn to the open Court the Second day of May 1859.
John G. Sering, Clerk
State of Indiana Jefferson County: I John Sering Clerk of the Court of Common Pleas in and for said county do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true and complete record of the will of Nathaniel Sherman late of said County, deceased, and of the Certificate of Probate ordered thereon. Witness my hand at Madison, Ind 2 day of May 1859.
John G. Sering
C. C. C. P.
Jeff. Co

[NI0375] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: 1850 Census Jefferson, Indiana
Publication Information: GSF#442932

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Pg380
Title: 1860 Census, Jefferson, Indiana
Author: U.S. Government
Publication Information: GSF#803270

!See Nathaniel Sherman; 1860 census, Jefferson Co, IN p380 lists her
as Abigail Shearman; The book "Some Descendants of Philip Sherman",
pub. 1968 by Roy V. Sherman lists her maiden name as Wells. IGI
lists marriage between Nathaniel Sherman and Abigail S Wing, 26 OCT
1806, Westport, Bristol, MA, SS: 26 Oct 1951.
CENSUS:
1860 Jefferson, IN, p380 GSF#803270
Abigail Shearman 70 Mass.
Amanda 33 IN
Sarah 15 IN
Ezra 5 IN
William 26 IN

[NI0376] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Book O Pg411
Title: Probate Records Of Jefferson, Indiana
Source Comments: The will was written on 28 May 1867 and it was presented on 20 Jun 1867 where it refers to the late Moses Rogers.

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Pg214
Title: 1850 Census Jefferson, Indiana
Publication Information: GSF#442932

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Pg50
Title: 1860 Census, Jefferson, Indiana
Author: U.S. Government
Publication Information: GSF#803270

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Pg202
Title: 1840 Census Jefferson, Indiana
Author: U.S. Government

!Mary Sherman lived with him in 1860, census Jefferson Co, IN p414; also listed on 1850 census p214; His spouse is on 1870 p532, but he is not; based on adjacent listings in 1850, 1860, and 1870 census, I infer that he has siblings Charles, 1815, Ephraim, 1812, James, 1797, William, 1809; There is a Rachel, born 1772 on 1850 census living with Ephraim, p137; 1830 Census lists a Moses Rogers in Jefferson Co and one in Clark Co; the one on Jefferson has several people living there that seem too old to be his kids and some older ones also, Could it be his father and siblings; IGI lists Moses Rogers, born 1806, PA, father named Samuel; Will is in Jefferson Co, In Will Book A, pg394, GSF#1310220; probate in GSF#1310231, Book O, pg411. Lists wife Anna, but little else. Witnesses by Henry Louis, John H. Vernon, and Wm Rodgers. He signed the will on 28 May 1867 and it was presented on 20 Jun 1867 after his death meaning he died in those three weeks.
CENSUS:
1860 Jefferson, IN p50 GSF#803270
Moses Rodgers 50 PA
Anna 50 KY
David 24 IN
Jenet 21 IN
Barton 16 IN
Manerva 15 IN
Mary Shearman 23 IN
Esra 5 IN
Ann 3 IN
Belia 2 IN
Margaret 2/12 IN
1840 Jefferson, IN p202
Moses Rogers
1m under5 2f under5
1m 30-40 1f 5-10
1f 30-40
William Rogers is on the same page.
1850 Jefferson, IN p214 GSF#442932 next to William
Moses Rogers 40 Pa
Anna 40 Ky
David 14 IN
Mary J 13 IN
Gennet 11 IN female
Barton 7 IN
Mervy A 6 IN female
Mariah 3 IN female

Will of Moses Rodgers

I, Moses Rodgers of Jefferson County in the State of Indiana do make and publish this my last will and testament and to such worldly estate as it has pleased God to entrust me with I dispose of the same in the following manner to wit I bequeath all of my real estate and personal property to my beloved wife Anna Rodgers after all of my just debts are paid And to effectuate this my intention I hereby vest my beloved wife with full power and authority to dispose of my personal and realestate in fee simple or for a term of years or otherwise in as full and ample a manner in every respect as I would myself do if living And I hereby make and ordain my beloved wife Anna Rodgers executor of this my last will and testament In witness whereof I Moses Rodgers the testator have hereunto set my hand and seal this twenty eighth day of May in the year of our Lord Eighteen hundred and sixty seven. Moses Rodgers (seal)

Signed sealed published and declared by the within named Moses Rodgers as his last will and testament in the presence of us who have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses hereto in the presence of the said testator and in the presence of each other.

Henry Louis
John H Vernon
Wm. Rodgers

The state of Indiana , Jefferson County:
On this day appeared in open court John H. Vermin, William Rodgers, two of the subscribing witnesses to the Last Will and Testament of Moses Rodgers, late of Said County, deceased, Being duly sworn on their oath say they saw the said Moses Rodgers sign and seal the foregoing paper on his Will and they with Henry Louis subscribed the same as witnesses in the presence of each other and in the presence of and at the request of said Moses Rodgers this deposement further saith said Moses Rodgers was at the time of making and executing said paper as his Will of full age to divide his property and of sound mind and memory and not under coercion and restraint and that he did publish and declare the same to be his will and further saith not.

Henry Louis
John H Vermin
Wm. Rodgers

Subscribed and Swore to before me this 20th day of June 1867.

State of Indiana, Jefferson County
David J. Phillips, Clerk
David J. Phillips clerk of the court of Common Pleas in and for said county do hereby certify that the foregoing is a full and complete copy of the Last will and testament of Moses Rodgers late of said county deceased, and the original is now on file in my office. Witnessed my hand and the seal of said court at Madison this 20th day of June 1867.

David J. Phillips, clerk

[NI0377] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Book U Pg161,182,207,442,643, Book V Pg83,373
Title: Probate Records Of Jefferson, Indiana
Source Comments: The will was written on 28 May 1867 and it was presented on 20 Jun
1867 where it refers to the late Moses Rogers.

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: 1850 Census Jefferson, Indiana
Publication Information: GSF#442932

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: 1860 Census, Jefferson, Indiana
Author: U.S. Government
Publication Information: GSF#803270

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Pg532
Title: 1870 Census Jefferson, Indiana
Author: U.S. Government
Publication Information: GSF#545827

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: 1880 Census Jefferson, Indiana
Author: U.S. Government

!Probate records in GSF#1310234,5, Book U. pg161,182,207,442,643 and
Book V pg83,373. Member of the Milton Baptist Church in Jefferson,
IN in 1867, 977.213 m2 k2R. Ellen Layton references a letter from a
niece of John McCullough that confirms that Anna is the daughter of
John.
CENSUS:
1870 Jefferson, IN p 532 GSF#545827
Anna Rogers 61 IN
Barton 26 IN
Minerva 25 IN
Marcia 23 IN
Ezra 15 IN
Capitolia 10 IN
Next dwelling is David Rogers. He has Eliza Sherman living there.
John Marquis is nearby.

[NI0379] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Book E Pg110,148, Book H Pg53,54
Title: Probate Records Of Jefferson, Indiana
Source Comments: The will was written on 28 May 1867 and it was presented on 20 Jun 1867 where it refers to the late Moses Rogers.
SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Pg133
Title: 1830 Census Jefferson, Indiana
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Pg202
Title: 1840 Census Jefferson, Indiana
Author: U.S. Government

!1830 census, Jefferson Co, IN, GSF7717 p133 lists age with 6 kids; spouse born 1780 to 1790. GSF#1310226, Jefferson Co, IN probate, Book E, pp110 and 148, and GSF#1310228, Book H, pp53,54 list death and heirs; also says he is owed money from Butler Co, PA; Moses Jr was born in PA; Spouse was born 1780/1790; Probate record also lists William McGreggor, Mary McGreggor, and Moses McGreggor as infant heirs of Moses Rogers Sr and appoints a McGreggor as guardian. Alex McGreggor, Moses Rogers, and James Barnum protested the will. There is also a Moses Rodgers in Clark, IN in 1830. 1810 Census lists Moses Rogers in Washington, PA and M. Rodgers in Butler, PA. M. Rogers seems too young (16-25), but it could be mistake because his spouse is older and they already have 6 kids, all under 10. The one in Washington is over 26 and also has 6 kids under 10. They could be double listings of the same person. In 1820 there is a Moses Rodgers in Allegany, PA which is directly between Washington and Butler counties. There is also one in Philadelphia that I didn't look up. His daughter Sarah apparently got married in Jefferson, IN before he left Pennsylvania. Crumrine's history says he married Miss Turner, had 14 children, and moved West. Sharon K Weaver lists his death in Butler, PA. Ellen Gayle Layton lists his death in Jefferson, IN and his birth in Ireland.
CENSUS:
1810 Butler, PA p130 GSF#193672
M. Rogers
3m under 10 3f under 10 (William,Moses,?,Sarah,Jannet,Martha)
1m 16-25 1f 26-44
1810 Washington, PA p74 GSF#193683 15 Dec 1810
Moses Rodgers
3m under 10 3f under 10
1m over 26-44 1f 26-44
1820 Allegany, PA p190 GSF#181403 21 Nov 1820
Moses Rodgers
2m under 10 3f under 10 (?,?,Fanny, Margaret, Oleva)
2m 10-15 2f 10-15 (William,Moses,?,Martha)(Sarah was
married)
1m over 45 1f 16-25 (Jannet)
1f 26-44
1830 Jefferson, IN p133 GSF#7717
Moses Rodgers
1m 5-10 1f 10-15 (Ebenezer)
1m 15-20 2f 15-20 (Moses)
1m 20-30 1f 40-50 (William)
1m 50-60 (the three girls include Fanny, Margaret, and
Lovey.
Sarah, Jannet, and Martha are already married). Probate records say died 9 Mar 1838. Bk E, GSF#1310226, pg110, 24 Mar 1838. Exec. Chauncey Lewis and William Rogers, Will submitted. Son Ebenzer gets land at age 21, until then rented and rent divided to Margaret, Sarah, Ebenzer. Margaret and Sarah are daughters. Lovely is daughter. Money owed from Butler Co. PA, William Ayers, attorney, $50. Moses--son gets $1.00. Daughter Fanny looks like last name is Swan. Will written 9 Mar, 1838. Witnesses: John Brown, Thomas Jackson, John Neal. Contested by Moses Rogers, Alexander McGreggor, and James Barnum. P148 lists Ebenzer Rogers, William McGreggor, Mary McGreggor, and Moses McGreggor as infant heirs of Moses Sr.

Will Records of Jefferson Co, IN 0850422
Rogers, Moses Will Book B
Will written March 9, 1838, Butler Co, PA. Sons: Ebenezer, Moses; dau Margaret, Sarah, Lovy, Fanny. Lawsuit over will gives heirs: Jeanetta Rogers Lewis, w of Chauncey B Lewis; William Rogers, Moses Rogers, Lovy Barnum, wife of James Barnum; Fanny Rogers Short, wife of Wm Short; Sarah, Margaret, Ebenezer Rogers; William, Moses and Mary McGregor, children of Martha Rogers and Alexander McGregor both dead.

[NI0380] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!"The History of Washington Co., Pennsylvania" by Boyd Cummrine, pp 566-7 says: "After the close of the Revolutionary war, not withstanding the anomalous conditions of affairs existing in the region where (until August, 1780) the jurisdiction of two different States, under dissimilar laws, enforced by diverse set of magistrates, had been exercised over the same people, the beautiful and fertile Monongahela valley invited settlements, and the neighborhood of which Parkinson's Ferry was the central point increased in numbers quite rapidly. But after the passing of so many years, and in consequence of the lack of authentic data, it is now impossible to ascertain the names of but very few of these early residents. Among them, however, was James Rodgers and his family. With his wife and seven children - three sons and four daughters - Mr. Rodgers emigrated from the north of Ireland and settle at Parkinson's ferry during the year 1786. Another daughter, who was married in Ireland to a gentleman names Hamilton, came to this country at a subsequent time. The old people lived but a short time after their settlement here. They were of the 'first Irish Stock', were freeholders in the old country, and the change from the comforts and the enjoyments of their former lives to the privations of the wilderness was more than they could bear, and they died within a short time of each other. The daughters it appears brought some of their former ways of living with them. They are said to have been very beautiful and fond of dress, and wore their hair crimped and powdered, and long plumes in their hats, which must have been something unusual among the settlers, for the Rev. Mr. McMillan, pastor of the old Pigeon Creek Church, where they attended, once reproved them for their striking appearance, saying they 'took the attention of teh congregation from him.' One of them, Olivia Rodgers, was married to Benjamin Parkinson in 1796, and their descendants are well known. William, a son resulting from this marriage, married a daughter of Hon. James Rodgers of Ohio, thus a second time uniting the Parkinson and Rodgers families. The sons of James Rodgers who emigrated from Ireland were Moses, Andrew, and Ebenezer. Moses married a Miss Turner, and lived for some years near Mingo Creek, where he owned or operated a gristmill. He became the father of fourteen children...concluded that it were better to 'go West' and grow up with the country. Many of his descendants may now be found at or near Madison, Indiana. Andrew married a Miss Duncan. Ebenezer, the third son of James Rodgers Sr., never married." The obituary of his grandson, Hon. James Rodgers of Ohio, says they came from Tyrone County in Ireland. There is a William Rogers, Revolutionary War soldier buried in Pisgah church cemetery in Jefferson, IN. Is he related? There is also a will for James Rogers in Clark, IN, Adm by Moses Rogers 20 Feb 1833, sec: Thomas Rogers, 977.2 A1 no21.
----------------------------------------
The Parkinson Family, pg 1355. Benjamin Parkison was married in 1796 to Olivia Rodgers, daughter of James Rodgers, who emigrated from the North of Ireland, and in 1786 located in Washington county, Penn. The parents died soon after their arrival, leaving a family of seven children, of whom are named: Moses, Andrew, Ebenezer and Olivia. Benjamin Parkison is described as a proud, stately man, very fond of personal adornment. Every morning his hair was powdered, and on special occasions silver buckles were worn; and when he rode, his horse was elegantly caparisoned, with mane and tail braided, as was then the style. Mrs. Parkison was no less remarkable for her love of display, and they were known as an unusually handsome and distinguished looking couple.

Beers, J. H. and Co., Commemorative Biographical Record of Washington County, Pennsylvania (Chicago: J. H. Beers & Co., 1893).

[NI0381] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Oliver Franklin Marquis
Prepared by Brent Haroldsen
1251 Sprague Street, Manteca, California
November, 1998

BIRTH: His death certificate lists his birth as April 1876 and says he was born in Kansas. The 1900 census also lists April 1876 in Kansas, age 24. In the 1880 Census, he was four years old, living in Elk County, Kansas. The 1920 Census lists his age as 43 in January and says he was born in Missouri. His marriage license in Missouri lists his age as 23 on 19 November 1898. This is inconsistent with all other records. A second marriage record in Kansas lists his age as 28 on November 23, 1904. On the death record for his stillborn son it lists his place of birth as Cowley County, Kansas. Some sources list him as Franklin Oliver Marquis, others as Oliver Frank Marquis.

PARENTS: His death certificate lists his father as I.L. Marquis, mother unknown. The death certificate of his brother, James Herbert Marquis , lists I.N. Marquis and Carolina Sherman. The death certificate of another brother, Roy Lee Marquis , lists Isaac Marquis and Caroline Sherman. The death certificate of William Edgar Marquis, another brother, lists Isaac N. Marquis and Cordelia. His application for social security lists I.N. Marquis and Caroline Alice Sherman. In the 1880 census he was living with I.N. and Hannah Marquis. This is apparently an error since Hannah was Isaac's mother, but the age listed is Cordelia's age. Our research indicates that his parents names were Isaac Newton Marquis and Cordelia Alice Sherman (see separate notes for them).

MARRIAGE: There are two separate marriage records for Oliver Marquis. The first was in Jackson County, Missouri on 20 November 1898 between Oliver F. Marquis of Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri and Eva M. Wyatt of Spring Hill, Johnson County, Kansas. The record includes the application for license, the license and the confirmation of marriage. The second was in Wyandotte County, Kansas between Oliver T. Marquis and Eva M. Marquis. There is no reason to believe these are different spouses, but we do not know why they would have repeated the marriage. The dates and ages in the first marriage are not consistent. It says that he was 23 and she was 20. If he was born in April 1876, as all the other sources say, he would be 22 in November 1898. Similarly, all other sources say she was born in June 1879, which would make her 19. The 1900 census, which lists her name as Effie, says they were married 2 years. The census was taken in June, before their second anniversary. I would like to find them in 1910 census since it would also list how long they have been married.

CHILDREN: The 1920 census lists Carl R., Earnest K., Florence B., and Billie S. Carl Rhodes was born 6 January, 1908 in Rosedale, Wyandotte, Kansas and died 11 July, 1967 in West Palm Beach, Palm Beach, Florida. Mrs. Helen Eugenia Bearden Marquis (Jean), a sister in law, says he had twins who died shortly after birth and no other children. Rhodes is the maiden name of his great grandmother. We believe his wife's name was Thelma. Earnest K. Marquis was born 1912 in Kansas (presumably Rosedale, Wyandotte, Kansas) and died 15 June 1923 in Arcadia, DeSoto, Florida. Jean Marquis says he died from complications related to measles. Florence Elizabeth Marquis was born 15 September 1913 in Rosedale, Wyandotte, Kansas. She married B.J. Rogers. Jean Marquis says she died in 1976 in Texas. Billy Strand Marquis was born 8 August 1919 in Canal Point, Palm Beach, Florida and died 6 December 1969 in Alamo, Hidalgo, Texas. He married (1) Helen Eugenia Bearden on 26 August 1943. He later married (2) Sandra Ann Huttinson. There is a record of another son being born in Lake Worth, Palm Beach, Florida on 17 December 1915. The death record says stillborn, but there was a death record. Jean Marquis says there were several other children born before Carl who died as infants. These would be numbered in the 1910 census if we could find it. Jean Marquis also says that his wife died in childbirth when Billie was about 18 months.

DEATH: His death certificate says he died 20 January, 1955 in West Palm Beach, Palm Beach, Florida at age 78 and was buried 22 January, 1955 at Hillcrest Cemetery.

OTHER: His obituary, source unknown, says: "Oliver Frank Marquis -- Mr. Marquis, 78, died Thursday morning at his home, 2000 Okeechobee Rd. A native of Kansas, Mr. Marquis had lived most of his life in Florida. He was a retired blacksmith.
Surviving are two sons, Carl and Billy, both of West Palm Beach; one daughter, Mrs. B.J. Rogers of Tulsa, Okla.; three brothers, William and Bert of West Palm Beach, and Ben of Texas.
Services will be held at the graveside at 1 pm at the Hillcrest Cemetery, the Rev. James Miedema, pastor of Haverhill Baptist Church, officiating. Mizell-Simon-Faville are in charge of arrangements."

According to a letter from DeSoto County chamber of commerce, he lived on Polk Avenue above Pine Street in Arcadia, FL in 1921. Jean Marquis says they moved to Florida in 1913 on a covered wagon. They went through Texas on the way and may have stopped there for a while to earn money. I cannot find them in the 1910 census although the rest of the family was in Wyandotte County, Kansas.

CENSUS:
1880 Elk, KS soundex
I.N. Marquis 26 MO
Hannah 21 IN
Franklin 4 KS
William 1 KS

1900 Wyandotte, KS GSF#1370389 ED171 Sh11 16Jun 1900
O.F. Marquis 24 Apr1876 KS KS KS
Effie 21 2Jun1879 IN IN IN married 2 yrs

1900 Wyandotte, KS ED171 S12 GSF#1370389 17Jun1900
I.N. Marquis 48 Dec1851 MO married 26 yrs
C. Alice 42 Apr1858 IN IN IN 6kids, 5alive
Frank 20 Aug1879 KA (probably William, Frank is listed elsewhere)
Jas. H. 16 Feb1884 NE
Benj. 12 Nov1887 MO
Roy 1 Aug1899 MO

1910 Wyandotte, KS ED202 sh11 shawnee twp 26Apr1910
Isaac N. Marquis 61? MO MO IN married 36 yrs
Cordellia A. 52 IN IN IN 6kids, 5living
William E. 31 KS
Benjamin H. 23 MO
Roy L. 12 MO

1920 Pahokee, Palm Beach, FL ED138 SH4 L75 GSF#1820229 8-9Jan1920
Oliver F. Marquis 43 MO MO IN machinist
Eva M. 40 IN IN IN
Carl R. 11 KA MO IN
Earnest K. 8 KA MO IN
Florence B. 6 KA MO IN
Billie S. 5/12 FL MO IN

1920 West Palm Beach, FL ED143 s14 l49 12Jan
Issac N. Marquis 65 US watchmaker married
William E. 40 US
Hazel 30 NE daughterinlaw
Roy L. 21 KS

SOURCES:
Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death Page: #2455, B.S. Marquis informant.
U.S. Government 1900 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas, ED171, Sh11, 16 Jun 1900.
U.S. Government 1880 Census, Elk, Kansas.
Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death #5421.
U.S. Government 1920 Census, Pahokee, Palm Beach, Florida, ED138, Sh4, 8-9 Jan 1920.
Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death Vol.1912, #33379, Wm. Marquis informant.
Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death Vol.1608, #21151, William E. Marquis informant.
Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death Vol.2439, #8879, Robert J. Marquis informant.
Marriage License, Jackson County, Missouri Recorder, #17140.
Marriage Record, Wyandotte County, Kansas Office of the Probate Judge, Record 18, P446.
Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death #60304.
Desoto County, Florida Death Record. Local Register #652, Book 5.
Kansas Division of Vital Statistics Certificate of Birth #27254. This is a delayed birth certificate.
Texas Bureau of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death #88468.
Alabama Marriage license #40817.West Palm Beach, FL August 1953 from Obituary

*****

# ID: I11802
# Name: Oliver Franklin Marquis 1 2
# Sex: M
# Birth: APR 1876 in Cowley, Kansas 1 2
# Death: 20 JAN 1955 in West Palm Beach, Palm Beach, Florida 1 2
# Burial: 22 JAN 1955 Hillcrest Cemetery, West Palm Beach, Palm Beach, Florida 1 2
# Reference Number: MMRO3D
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

Oliver Franklin Marquis
Prepared by Brent Haroldsen
1251 Sprague Street, Manteca, California
November, 1998
BIRTH: His death certificate lists his birth as April 187 6 and says he was born in Kansas. The 1900 census also list s April 1876 in Kansas, age 24. In the 1880 Census, he wa s four years old, Unknown in Elk County, Kansas. The 1920 Ce nsus lists his age as 43 in January and says he was born i n Missouri. His marriage license in Missouri lists his ag e as 23 on 19 November 1898. This is inconsistent with al l other records. A second marriage record in Kansas lists h is age as 28 on November 23, 1904. On the death record fo r his stillborn son it lists his place of birth as Cowle y County, Kansas. Some sources list him as Franklin Olive r Marquis, others as Oliver Frank Marquis.
PARENTS: His death certificate lists his father as I.L. Mar quis, mother unknown. The death certificate of his brother , James Herbert Marquis , lists I.N. Marquis and Carolina S herman. The death certificate of another brother, Roy Lee M arquis , lists Isaac Marquis and Caroline Sherman. The deat h certificate of William Edgar Marquis, another brother, li sts Isaac N. Marquis and Cordelia. His application for soci al security lists I.N. Marquis and Caroline Alice Sherman . In the 1880 census he was Unknown with I.N. and Hannah Mar quis. This is apparently an error since Hannah was Isaac' s mother, but the age listed is Cordelia's age. Our researc h indicates that his parents names were Isaac Newton Marqui s and Cordelia Alice Sherman (see separate notes for them).
MARRIAGE: There are two separate marriage records for Olive r Marquis. The first was in Jackson County, Missouri on 2 0 November 1898 between Oliver F. Marquis of Kansas City, J ackson County, Missouri and Eva M. Wyatt of Spring Hill, Jo hnson County, Kansas. The record includes the application f or license, the license and the confirmation of marriage. T he second was in Wyandotte County, Kansas between Oliver T . Marquis and Eva M. Marquis. There is no reason to believ e these are different spouses, but we do not know why the y would have repeated the marriage. The dates and ages in t he first marriage are not consistent. It says that he was 2 3 and she was 20. If he was born in April 1876, as all th e other sources say, he would be 22 in November 1898. Simil arly, all other sources say she was born in June 1879, whic h would make her 19. The 1900 census, which lists her nam e as Effie, says they were married 2 years. The census wa s taken in June, before their second anniversary. I would l ike to find them in 1910 census since it would also list ho w long they have been married.
CHILDREN: The 1920 census lists Carl R., Earnest K., Floren ce B., and Billie S. Carl Rhodes was born 6 January, 1908 i n Rosedale, Wyandotte, Kansas and died 11 July, 1967 in Wes t Palm Beach, Palm Beach, Florida. Mrs. Helen Eugenia Beard en Marquis (Jean), a sister in law, says he had twins who d ied shortly after birth and no other children. Rhodes is th e maiden name of his great grandmother. We believe his wife 's name was Thelma. Earnest K. Marquis was born 1912 in Kan sas (presumably Rosedale, Wyandotte, Kansas) and died 15 Ju ne 1923 in Arcadia, DeSoto, Florida. Jean Marquis says he d ied from complications related to measles. Florence Elizabe th Marquis was born 15 September 1913 in Rosedale, Wyandott e, Kansas. She married B.J. Rogers. Jean Marquis says she d ied in 1976 in Texas. Billy Strand Marquis was born 8 Augus t 1919 in Canal Point, Palm Beach, Florida and died 6 Decem ber 1969 in Alamo, Hidalgo, Texas. He married (1) Helen Eu genia Bearden on 26 August 1943. He later married (2) Sandr a Ann Huttinson. There is a record of another son being bor n in Lake Worth, Palm Beach, Florida on 17 December 1915. T he death record says stillborn, but there was a death recor d. Jean Marquis says there were several other children bor n before Carl who died as infants. These would be numbere d in the 1910 census if we could find it. Jean Marquis als o says that his wife died in childbirth when Billie was abo ut 18 months.
DEATH: His death certificate says he died 20 January, 195 5 in West Palm Beach, Palm Beach, Florida at age 78 and wa s buried 22 January, 1955 at Hillcrest Cemetery.
OTHER: His obituary, source unknown, says: "Oliver Frank Ma rquis -- Mr. Marquis, 78, died Thursday morning at his home , 2000 Okeechobee Rd. A native of Kansas, Mr. Marquis had l ived most of his life in Florida. He was a retired blacksmi th. Surviving are two sons, Carl and Billy, both of West Palm B each; one daughter, Mrs. B.J. Rogers of Tulsa, Okla.; thre e brothers, William and Bert of West Palm Beach, and Ben o f Texas. Services will be held at the graveside at 1 pm at the Hillc rest Cemetery, the Rev. James Miedema, pastor of Haverhil l Baptist Church, officiating. Mizell-Simon-Faville are i n charge of arrangements."
According to a letter from DeSoto County chamber of commerc e, he lived on Polk Avenue above Pine Street in Arcadia, F L in 1921. Jean Marquis says they moved to Florida in 191 3 on a covered wagon. They went through Texas on the way an d may have stopped there for a while to earn money. I canno t find them in the 1910 census although the rest of the fam ily was in Wyandotte County, Kansas.

CENSUS:
1880 Elk, KS soundex
I.N. Marquis 26 MO
Hannah 21 IN
Franklin 4 KS
William 1 KS

1900 Wyandotte, KS GSF#1370389 ED171 Sh11 16Jun 1900 O.F. Marquis 24 Apr187 6 KS KS KS Effie 21 2Jun187 9 IN IN IN married 2 yrs

1900 Wyandotte, KS ED171 S12 GSF#1370389 17Jun1900 I.N. Marquis 48 Dec1851 M O married 26 yrs C. Alice 42 Apr1858 IN I N IN 6kids, 5alive Frank 20 Aug1879 KA (probabl y William, Frank is listed elsewhere)
Jas. H. 16 Feb1884 NE
Benj. 12 Nov1887 MO
Roy 1 Aug1899 MO

1910 Wyandotte, KS ED202 sh11 shawnee twp 26Apr1910 Isaac N. Marquis 61? MO M O IN married 36 yrs Cordellia A. 52 IN I N IN 6kids, 5living
William E. 31 KS
Benjamin H. 23 MO
Roy L. 12 MO
1920 Pahokee, Palm Beach, FL ED138 SH4 L75 GSF#1820229 8-9 Jan1920 Oliver F. Marquis 43 M O MO IN machinist Eva M. 40 I N IN IN Carl R. 11 K A MO IN Earnest K. 8 K A MO IN Florence B. 6 K A MO IN Billie S. 5/1 2 FL MO IN

1920 West Palm Beach, FL ED143 s14 l49 12Jan Issac N. Marquis 65 US watchmake r married
William E. 40 US Hazel 30 NE daug hterinlaw
Roy L. 21 KS

SOURCES: Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death P age: #2455, B.S. Marquis informant. U.S. Government 1900 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas, ED171, Sh 11, 16 Jun 1900.
U.S. Government 1880 Census, Elk, Kansas. Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death # 5421. U.S. Government 1920 Census, Pahokee, Palm Beach, Florida , ED138, Sh4, 8-9 Jan 1920. Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death V ol.1912, #33379, Wm. Marquis informant. Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death V ol.1608, #21151, William E. Marquis informant. Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death V ol.2439, #8879, Robert J. Marquis informant. Marriage License, Jackson County, Missouri Recorder, #171 40. Marriage Record, Wyandotte County, Kansas Office of the P robate Judge, Record 18, P446. Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death # 60304. Desoto County, Florida Death Record. Local Register #652 , Book 5. Kansas Division of Vital Statistics Certificate of Birt h #27254. This is a delayed birth certificate. Texas Bureau of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death #88 468.
Alabama Marriage license #40817.



Father: Isaac Newton Marquis b: 27 DEC 1853 in Jackson, Missouri
Mother: Cordelia Alice Sherman b: APR 1858 in Madison, Jefferson, Indiana

Marriage 1 Eva Mae Wyatt b: 2 JUN 1879 in , Newton, Indiana

* Married: 20 NOV 1898 in Kansas City, Jackson, Missouri 1 2
* Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: #17140 Citation Comments: She was from Springhill, Johnson Coun ty, Kansas. Record includes application for license, the license, and confirmatio n of marriage.
Title: Marriage License, Jackson, Missouri
Author: Jackson County, Missouri Recorder
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Record 18, P446
Date: 23 Nov 1904 Citation Comments: Oliver T. Marquis married Eva M. Marq uis, both of Rosedale, Kansas
on 23 Nov. 1904.
Title: Marriage Record, Wyandotte, Kansas
Author: Wyandotte, Kansas Probate Judge
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

SOURCE CITATION:
Date: 16 Jun 1900
Citation Comments: Says they were married 2 years.
Title: 1900 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government

Children

1. Has No Children Carl Rhodes Marquis b: 6 JAN 1908 in Rosedale, Wyandotte, Kansas
2. Has No Children Earnest K Marquis b: 1912 in Rosedale, Wyandotte, Kansas
3. Has No Children Florence Elizabeth Marquis b: 15 SEP 1913 in Rosedale, Wyandotte, Kansas
4. Has No Children Infant Marquis b: 17 DEC 1915 in Lake Worth, Palm Beach, Florida
5. Has Children Billy Strand Marquis b: 8 AUG 1919 in Canal Point, Palm Beach, Florida


Sources:

1. Title: 684427.ged
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 6, 2002
2. Title: wood.FTW
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[NI0383] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Conversations with Mrs. Jean Marquis
Source Comments: Mrs. Marquis, nee Bearden, was the wife of Billy Marquis and mother of Donna Haroldsen. Donna has notes of several converations with her about family history.
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

!1900 Census for Cordelia Alice says she had 6 kids, 5 living. Donna's mom says they had a daughter that died young. I guess she was between Ben and Roy because it is the largest gap.

[NI0384] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Robert is listed in Madison Co, KY in 1810 and was married there in 1806. The only Marquis on the 1800 and 1795 tax lists for that county is George. This plus the fact that Robert had a son named George leads to me infer that George is Robert's father. I later received notes from Helen Cooper stating, "I have no proof of Robert's parents, but several clues lead me to believe that George, Elder and leader of music in the Cross Creek, Pa. Church could be his father." GSF#8126 Ky taxpayer list shows George in 1796 thru 1809, except 1807 which is hard to read. The first male between 16 and 21 appears in 1803 which fits Robert. George is not on the 1810 census, but Robert has a male over 45 listed that could be him. This assumes that Robert is the male between 16 and 26. There is a John Marquis in Jefferson, IN next door to Jacob Rhodes, born 28 Dec 1793 in PA, died 17 Apr 1871, buried Flatbottom cem, Shelby twp.
GSF#849926 p421. Could he be another son of George? 977.8453 H2h
History of Lafayette, MO says the first school south of Dover in 1822 was taught by George Marquis who died soon after. Letter from Betty Burgess says George was buried in Montgomery County, IN. In that case, the one that died in Lafayette, MO was probably his son (Robert's brother). There are two George's in Jefferson IN in 1820, one over 45 and one 16-25. The letter from Betty Burgess also lists George as son of Robert Marquis of Cecil County, Maryland. She says George settled in Washington County, PA then removed to KY, the IN. She says he purchased land in 1823 in Montgomery, county IN and his grave is in Michael Cemetery, Union Twp, Montgomery County IN. An index to the cemetery lists his birth as 1717 (probably 1747) and his death as 1 Jan 1835. Tombstone says he was born in Maryland. Helen Harmon says he moved to Montgomery county with his daughter Polly and son-in-law James Scott about 1821. She says the grave marker was covered with grass in a very old cemetery outside Crawfordsville, Indiana. Census says he was born between 1745 and 1750. Betty Burgess also says he had a will written 31 March, 1832, probated in the May term of 1835. He left his land to his Grandsons George Marquis and James Wilson Scott. She lists his kids that she knows of as Robert, George, Rebecca, Mary (Polly), and Eleanor.
History of Washington, PA 974.822 H2c lists George Marques, cousin of Rev. Thomas Marquis as early settler of Cross Creek. He bought land in 1 Nov 1776 and again on 18 Sep 1787. Elder in Presbyterian church in 1779. Moved to Mercer County, PA where descendants resided in 1882. Sold land in Cross Creek in 1789 to William Rea. The notes of Helen Cooper say:
"1782 Religious movement of Cross Creek Church was signed by George and Mary Marquis and also by John and Thomas and their wives. The original settlers of Cross Creek were George Marquis, David Vance, and John Marquis. According to the Rollin R Marquis History, 'these antedate the coming of Rev Thomas and his brother John'. (My (Helen's) grandfather, Thomas, said his grandfather Robert was kin to Rev. Marquis, he thought a cousin) but I have not been able to establish him as a direct descendant of the 7 orphans of Opequon Valley in Virginia. Rollin concludes 'that John, George, and Samuel were either brothers of Thomas or his nephews, and so cousins of John and Rev. Thomas'."

1789 Hist of CC Presb Church says the singing master George sold farm and moved to KY. Helen Harmon says a George Marquis was listed a Freeman in Hope Twp, Washington Co., PA in 1785. She also says George and his brother Samuel operated a ferry boat from the river landing between Lonesome Hollow on the Jefferson County, Indiana side of the Ohio river and Milford, Kentucky about 1812.

History of the First Presbyterian Church of Bellefontaine, Ohio, p 236: William mr Margaret _________, came fr Ireland to Opequon Valley, near Winchester, Frederick Co., Va, in 1720. Chn, Thomas, Mary, mr John Wilson, she d at birth of only child; George, Samuel, John, and Thomas of Western Pa., were prob his grandsons by other sons

Estate Records 1781-96 and Deed Records 1782-85 in Washington Co, PA, 1977: George Marguis of Washington Co, Pa. to Sam Hineman 60 acres on Cross Creek July 7, 1783.

First Families of the Cross Creek Country, The REA family, by A. D. White: George Marquis, a cousin of the other Cross Creek Marquises, bought the 196-acre tract from John Marshall, but, according to records, he held possession for only about two years, then selling it to Mr. Rea.

Commemorative Biographical Record, Washington County, Pennsylvania, by J. H. Beers & Co., p 184: There were some others of the name of Marquis who lived in this county, and were cousins of the children of Thomas and Mary (Colville) Marquis. George Marquis was one of the first bench elders of Cross Creek Church. Samuel Marquis also lived near to Burgettstown, and John also lived in the same neighborhood. If these were first cousins of John and Rev. Thomas Marquis, as they claimed, William Marquis, who came from Ireland in 1720, must have left other children in Ireland, who came to America at a later period; and this appears most likely to be the case as all these parties came from near Winchester, Va, to this county.

History of Washington County, Pennsylvania; by Boyd Crumrine, p 724: George Marques was among the early settlers of Cross Creek. On Nov. 1, 1776, he bought from Thomas Bay a tract of land on Cross Creek containing two hundred and sixty acres; also Sept. 18, 1787, he bought of John Marshall a tract of one hundred and ninety-six acres. He was one of the first elders in Cross Creek Presbyterian Church, and was leader of the music. He was a cousin of John and Rev. Thomas Marquis. He afterwards sold his land and removed to Mercer Co., PA., in which section a number of his descendants still reside.

My (Helen Cooper) ggg-grandfather, Robert (son of George, son of Robert) named his oldest son George Wilson MARQUIS, supposedly because he wanted to honor John Wilson for raising Thomas Marquis' children.


Will of George Marquis

At a session of the Probate Court began and held at the Court House in the Town of Crawfordsville, County of Montgomery and State of Indiana on Monday the Eleventh day of May Eighteen hundred and thirty-five Present the Honorable Robert Taylor Judge of Said Court.

James Scott appeared in court and produced the last will and Testament of George Marquis Dec'd late of Montgomery county Indiana which is admitted to proof ... will together with the instrument thereon is in the words and figures following ... In the name of God Amen. I George Marquis of the County of Montgomery and State of Indiana being weak of body but of sound and perfect mind and memory do make and publish this my last will and Testament in manner for owing that is to say first I give and bequeath to my Grand Son George Marquis Scott the following Tract of land To wit The West Half of the North East quarter of Section No. four in Township No. Eighteen North of range No. Five West. I also give and bequeath unto my Grand Son James Wilson Scott the East Half of the North East quarter of Section No. fifteen in Township Nineteen North of Range No. four west both of which Tracts of Land being in the County and State aforesaid. This my last will and Testament in Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this thirty first-day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand Eight hundred thirty two.
George Marquis

(Sealed by the above named George Marquis to be his last will and Testament in the presence of us who have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses in the presence of the Testator.)
Witnesses
Job Combs
James C. McClung

State of Indiana Montgomery County . Probate Court May Term 1835 Be it remembered that on the Eleventh day of May AD 1835 before the Hon. Robert Taylor, Judge of the Probate Court of Said County in open Court formally appeared James C. McClung one of the Subscribing witnesses to the forgoing last will and Testament of George Marquis late of Said County Dec'd who being duly sworn in says that he saw the Testator therein named sign and seal the same and that he heard him publicly pronounce and declare the same to be his last will and Testament, that at the time of so doing he was at the best of his apprehension of sound and disposing mind and memory and understanding and that he by the request of said Testator and in his presence Subscribed his name heretofore as witness and further he states on oath that he is acquainted with the handwriting of the other subscriber witnesses and that he believes that the within is his Genuine...

CENSUS:
1795 KY taxpayer list, Madison County, 976.9R48t
George Marquis.

1800 KY taxpayer list, Madison County, 976.X2p
George Marquis 1800

1810 Madison, KY p233
1m under10 1f under10
1m 16-26 2f 16-26
1m over45 1f 26-45

Estate Records 1781-96 and Deed Records 1782-85 in Washington Co, PA 1977
Geo Marquis of Washington, Pa. to Sam Hineman 60 a. on Cross Cr. July 7, 1783.

Hoosier Jounral of Ancestry #2, Jefferson Co, Special #2 977.213 D25h
Deed Book B 1817-1821
55--Jan 20, 1818 John and Anne Henderson to George Marquis part of NE qtr. 11-3-9 beginning at NW corner, 70 acres. Witt: Matthew Cowley and David H. Maxwell

[NI0385] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

GSF#851647 lists him as signing bond for Lavinah's marriage in Madison Co, KY. I assume he is her father. The other kids listed are people named Jones, married in Madison Co, KY about the same time as Lavinah, with David listed on marriage record. GSF#8126 taxpayer lists shows him every year from 1797 to 1811. There are two in 1807. There is a male between 16 and 21 from 1804 to 1808. 1810 census, Madison, KY lists male 10 to 16 and male over 45. Two females under 10, two females 10 to 16, one female 16 to 26, one 26 to 45, and one over 45. 1850 census, Cooper, MO lists what appear to be several kids or grandkids including Elizabeth Turley, David, Abram, 70 NC, Jacob, 45 KY, John, 30 MO. also some other Turleys. 1830 Census lists him near Wyatt Jones 20-30, David Jones 30-40, Abraham Jones 40-50, Nancy Jones 50-60, Lewis Jones 40-50, Steven Turley, and several Reeds. He is not on 1840 census, but there are several Jones's in Cooper CO, MO including L.L 20-30, James 30-40, Henry 40-50, Hayden 50-60, Abraham 50-60, Jabez 30-40, Abram 20-30, David 40-50, Nancy 50-60, and Lester 20-30. AF lists David Jones married to Jane Ruble with kids, but not Lavinah, Anne, or David. Marriage date was 1789 or 1790 in Madison, KY, but this is apparently incorrect. The book Revolutionary Soldiers Buried in Missouri, printed 1966, also has this date and place. I can find no record of the marriage, but there is a marriage of David Jones and Rebecca Rutherford on 4 Feb 1790 in Nelson, KY. William Scoggins has a copy of a letter from David's son Jesse stating that his parents were married when 16 and 18 years of age or 1779. This is consistent with the birth dates of the children. There is a Land grant for David Jones in KY in 1781 GSF#7811, but there are other David Jones and it seems a little early for him if Eliza was really born in VA.

Cemetery Records of Cooper Co, MO, Vol VI, 977.851 Vc3r: William Reed Family Cemetery: In this cemetery, is buried David Jones, a Revolutionary War Soldier and his wife. He also was one of the first settlers of Lamine Twonship, coming in 1811. He also served furing the War of 1812 with Capt. Cooper's Militia.
JONES, David, b. Jan. 25, 1761 (?) in Pittsylvania County, Va.; d. Feb. 7, 1838 in Cooper Co., Mo.
Note: This birth date must be in error; however, the same birth and death dates are listed in a book, "Soldiers of the Revolutionary War Buried in Missouri", compiled by Mrs. Hale Houts, 1966.

977.851 V29e Early marriages and will of Cooper, MO lists the first settlers of Lamine twp as David Jones, Thomas and James McMahon, Stephen, Samuel, and Jesse Turley. David Jones was Rev. War veteran. David, James, and John Jones were among the first settlers of Moniteau twp. Apparently a different David.

977.8 M2ha Rev. War soldiers buried in MO, pub. 1966, lists David Jones and later kids (with spouses). Received pension in Henry Co. VA. Cemetery records lists Anna Reid, nee Jones, wife of William Reid, daughter of David and Anna Jones. Ann Baugh, says he was son of William M and Mary Harris Jones and a descendant of Mosias Jones of Albermarle Co. VA and Madison Co. KY (Ann is also descended from Mosias). Reed cemetery is in Arrow Rock, MO. She lists children as Anna, Lavinah, Elizabeth, Helena, Margaret, Lydia, Jane, Patsy, and Rebecca.
CENSUS:
1782 tax list, City of Richmond, Wardship 1, 975.5X2h, p112
David Jones 33 Taylor
Levina (wife) 18
John and Sarah (children)
same book list David Jones in Berkley, Dinwiddle, Henry, K. George,
Louisa, Northampton, and Southampton counties. Gives number of inhabitants
only.
1830 Cooper, MO p227 GSF#14854
David Jones Sr
1m under5 4f under5
1m 20-30 1f 5-10
1m 60-70 2f 20-30
1 slave 1f 60-70
1800 KY taxpayer list, Madison County 976.9 X2p
David Jones
1810 Madison, KY p245
2f under10
1m 10-16 2f 10-16
1f 16-26
1f 26-45
1m over45 1f over45

Prepared by William G. Scroggins, 718 Mill Valley Drive, Taylor Mill, KY 41015-2278; revised 22 March 1995.
David Jones served in the Revolutionary War from Virginia under Captain Owen Ruble, his father-in-law. He was a private for three months in the spring of 1777 and a sergeant for the same period of time in the spring of 1781, for which he received a pension. He moved from Franklin County, Virginia, to Madison County, Kentucky, in 1796 and from there to Cooper County, Missouri, in 1811. He died there on 07 February 1838, aged 77, and is buried in Reid-Kincheloe Cemetery, 4 miles south of Arrow Rock, Missouri. His wife Jane Ruble Jones died a few months later in her 75th year.

When Jesse Ruble Jones wrote in 1877 about his great-grandparents, as they were in 1796, he recollections were of his last seeing them before migrating to Kentucky with his father. Jesse visited Franklin County, Virginia, in 1859 and met two young grandsons of Thomas Jones and great-grandsons of Robert Jones and Mary Van Meter. They informed him that Robert Jones, son of Henry Jones and Frances Bohannon , was then living in Floyd County, Virginia. (Photocopy of original letter from Juanita Sigmon Halstead, Scott Depot, WV, 1995)

R. E. Jones, MD New Orleans La May 6th 1877
Dear Nephew
I received yours of the 2nd instant and was very glad to hear from you - We are all in good health and much elated at the change in our political affairs - I think that affairs in the South will now commence to improve. We, as well as most of the Citizens of Louisiana, have suffered much in our pecuniary affairs. We, however, have been able to save our real Estate which I think will soon become productive. I think a large Southern immigration will commence shortly. If our farmers would plant a third Crop in Cotton it would fetch more money. I think Mississippi and Louisiana should raise Corn for exportation. I have observed in my travel North and even West that the towns are growing too fast for the Country. Two thirds of the lands in some of the Northern States are uncultivated and growing up in Timber. We find that our poorest lands with good culture will produce more than the average lands in the New England States. Our last Legislature (illegible) passed reform laws which will lessen expenses of the State government at least to one half after they become operative.
With regard to our ancestors, .my great grand father came from Wales when a boy to Montgomery County Virginia about the year 1700 - When grown he married Mary Van Metre and had four sons Abraham, Thomas, Robert and Henry. I never heard of any daughters. - His name was Robert. in [sic] 1796 when I was about 8 years old I saw him and his wife, each supposed to be 100 years old, in good health appearing to have their faculties unimpaired. I recollect his entertaining me and other children in telling us of some inci[dences] of his boyhood age. They both lived several years after. I visited the place of my birth Franklin County in 1859 and there met two young men Grandsons of Thomas Jones. They informed me that a son of Henry Jones was a then living in Floyd County named Robert.
My Grandfather Robert Jones married a Miss Riley they had Four sons Elijah who moved to Georgia. Jesse who lived in the same neighborhood until 1859 and died at the age of 104. he [sic] was a Baptist Preacher. I heard him preach in 1796 and I was told he preached a Month before he died. One of Father's brothers named Isaac moved to Clay County Ky about 1800. I have not heard of since another Jonathan. I think must have died young as could not hear of him in Virginia. My father had three sisters Mary who married Wm McVity [sic] had one son named John was a Methodist Preacher. Elizabeth married Thurman and Tabitha married Hale.
My Grandfather Robert Jones was a Baptist Preacher. I think he died in Virginia about 1820.
My Mother Jane Ruble was daughter of Owen Ruble of German extraction. He commanded a Company of Militia at the taking of York Town. my [sic] father was a Subaltern in his Company - Major Turly [sic] son of my sister Elizabeth once wrote me that he was wearing the sword which my father wore at Yorktown. My mother's mother was Helena White born in Scotland her brother Alexander White of Winchester Virginia was member of the first Congress. I own an Eddition [of] Blackstone published by subscription before the Revolution
He gave it to my uncle Thos W Ruble who gave it to me. Grand mother Ruble was well educated. I was told she taught her sons the dead Languages.
My Mother had two brothers Thos W and Swingfield [sic] and Two Sisters Elizabeth who married Hale and Margaret who married Conner both Sisters moved to Ky and left children.
Thos W Ruble had a son John who moved to Texas he had two Daughters who married in Louisville. I do not know the names of the men they married.
My father and mother married at the ages of 16 and 18 years lived together within a few months of 60 years - They had Two Sons and nine Daughters.
I have heard nothing of the Family since the war.
If you have any information as to the present situation of our relations in Missouri I would take it as a great favor if you would write me the particulars. My love to your Family Grandmother and connections.
Jesse R Jones

[Some punctuation added for clarity.] The envelope was postmarked in Covington, Louisiana.

In writing that his grandfather Robert Jones married Miss Riley and had four sons and three daughters, Jesse R. Jones failed to include his father as one of them. He also appears not to have known that Robert Jones and Mary Van Meter had sons named John, Isaac and Abraham.

Subsequently, on 25 November 1902 Susan B. Jones of Covington, Louisiana, an unmarried daughter of Jesse R. Jones, wrote to her cousin Clara Jones in Crystal Springs, Mississippi (Photocopy of original letter from Juanita Sigmon Halstead, Scott Depot, WV, 1995):
Covington Nov 25th 1902
My dear Cousin
We received your letter and we were very glad to hear from you, as it had been a long time since we had done so. For the last twelve years, Serena and I have lived alone in the old home in Covington, and we only go to New Orleans two or three times a year, for a week or two at a time. We look on it now as quite a journey. All three of our nephews, James, Frank and Charlie are dead, but our two nieces, Arsine and Laura live in Covington, not far from us. After the death of our brother James, with whom they lived on a farm four miles from here, they moved into Covington. James (or Boy as he was always called) left two sons, Frank, the oldest, and Charlie, who lives with his aunts, Arsine and Laura, and is a very fine young man. Poor Frank is a hopeless invalid, an incurable disease of the spine which has paralyzed his lower limbs. He is now at Hot Springs, Ark. and the Doctors say that he may die at any time, or he may live for some months.
As to our relations, we regret that we did not write down what my Father used to tell us about them, for I am afraid that we cannot tell you much more than you already know. My Father's great, great grandfather came from Wales early in 1700 and settled near Winchester, Virginia. Pa remembered his great grandfather, and great grandmother (who were then more than ninety years old) and used to tell him anecdotes of their childhood in Wales. Afterwards Pa's grandfather moved to Franklin County, Virginia, near the little town of Rocky Mount, where Pa was born and some of his nine sisters. In 1795 Grandfather Jones moved (and a number of his neighbors) to Madison County, Ken - in the Bluegrass region. When my grandfather moved to Ken - he sold the farm in Virginia to a Mr. Saunders, whose descendants still own and live on it. When we were at one of the Virginia Springs in 1859, Pa rode over to see the old place. Pa removed with his father to Ken. and was educated there until he was twenty one (1808) then his health was delicate, and he was advised to come to a warmer climate. he came to Miss. near Natchez, where he remained three years. Then he moved to Covington in 1811, and began to practice law. Afterwards, Grandfather Jones moved (I do not know in what year) to Missouri, with his nine daughters, and Uncle Robert, who I think was born in Ken - Pa's mother was named Jane Ruble and her father had a farm in the same neighborhood in Virginia. As Pa never had any of the Family records, we do not know the names of the any of the wives of the different ancestors, except I think, one was named Van Meter. Pa had a copy of Blackstone, one of the first edition ever published in the United States, which was given to Grandfather Jones by one of his ancestors, to whom it belonged (Alexander White who was a member of the first Continental Congress, which ratified the Declaration of Independence). The names of our Aunts were Rebecca - Anna - Elizabeth - Martha - Helena - Margaret - Lavinia - Lydia and Jane. The married names were Rebecca Bingham - Anna Reid - Ferrell - Turley - Helena McMahon (and another married a McMahon) Thorpe - Lydia Allison and Jane Jones, (the Jones she married was no relation). I think Uncle Robert was one of the younger children. Pa used to receive letters occasionally from his surviving sisters, until the war interrupted the intercourse. He heard, however, that all of his nephews, who were of a suitable age, were in the Confederate army, which gratified him very much, as you know Missouri was so divided. At one time a cousin of Pa's (Dr. Josiah Hale) was Professor of Botany in the Medical College in New Orleans. He was a very scientific man, and a very nice old gentleman, but he died a year or two before the war. He was a celebrated botanist, and we often see his opinion quoted as an authority. I am sorry to say that we cannot tell you anything about the Robertsons, except that we have heard Ma say that her sister Serena was only fourteen years old, when she married Nathaniel Robertson in Georgia. Grandfather Ragan lived on a farm, and had a flour mill also, near Milledgeville, but moved his Family to Mississippi, (I think about 1814) Covington County. We send you a picture of my Father. I am sorry that we have no better one. He never took well, and always disliked to sit for his picture. We would send you one of ours, if we had one, but we have had none taken for thirty five years, and those were all given away at the time. In the summer, sometime, cannot you and Cousin Lizzie pay us a visit. We should be very glad to see you. The pine woods in winter look very bare and desolate, but in summer the country looks more attractive, and then too the trains arrive here before dark. When you come, write to us a few days before, and we will meet you at the train. Serena joins me in love to you, Cousin Lizzie and the children.
Your affectionate Cousin
Susan B. Jones

Another letter about the Jones Family was written to Miss Clara Jones in 1902 from Mrs. Louise J. B. Neff of Hardeman, Missouri (Photocopy of original letter from Juanita Sigmon Halstead, Scott Depot, WV, 1995):
Hardeman, Saline County, Mo. October 13, 1902.
Miss Clara Jones;
Dear Cousin,
Please pardon my tardiness in replying to your letter. It was received just after I moved back to the farm. I had to do my packing hurriedly and moved in bad weather.
The farm had been rented over nine years, therefore, I found much hard work to do after getting here.
The overwork caused me to have very severe attacks of headache - averaging one a week all season. It is difficult to get help here and my daughter and I have done all of our house work and the washing, too, most of the season.
I have had a gentleman - a cousin in poor health - staying with us 'till last week.
I am sorry I have so little information to give you.
My mother, Lamenda McMahan Bingham, she, the daughter of Margaret Jones McMahan, the latter a sister of your grandfather Dr. Robert Jones.
Margaret Jones married Thomas McMahan.
The sisters of Margaret Jones McMahan were all married, lived and died in Missouri, except one, perhaps; I give them on next page but not in rotation according to age.
Melvina Jones - Marcus
Betsy Jones - Turley
Annie Jones - Reed
Patsy Jones - Ferril
Lydia Jones - Allison
Helena Jones - McMahon
Rebecca Jones - Thorpe
Jane Jones - Jones
They were all considered remarkably intelligent women.
There is a son of Aunt Melvina Marcus - a methodist [sic] preacher - his name is David Marcus; he is in Missouri, I think; he being a son of the oldest daughter, may by reason of his student life remember some more than others. Your Aunt Mary might find him through her methodist [sic] friends.
I have not seen him since I was a child.
There is another Cousin Anna Reed McMahon, I wish to see; she has an excellent memory and being one of her mother's oldest children may remember some things from what her grandmother Annie Jones Reed may have told her.
Cousin Adelia Turley - Herndon says great grandfather David Jones was a colonel under Gen. Washington. She remembers his epulets [sic] and sword and of his telling of his days as a soldier.
After his death his effects were sold and her elder brother, Dr. Jesse Turley bought the sword but she does not remember ever seeing it after our civil war.
All of Dr. Turley's Family are dead except one son, which I'll try to find him.
I can not tell you anything about your great-great grandfather Owen Ruble.
There was an Owen Ruble lived and died here; he was a brother of great grandmother - Ruble - Jones, I think. I do not know what great grandmother [sic] first name was. She had a brother who was quite a noted physician in those days. She must have studied under him as she was quite well informed in medicine.
Some time I should like a copy of the letter written to your father by Uncle Jesse Jones; you say it contains considerable Family history. My mother was named for his first wife. Too late in life I began to take a genuine interest in our Family history. Those who could have informed me are dead. There was a David Thorpe, the only child of Aunt Rebecca Jones Thorpe. He did live in Platte County, Mo. He was very intelligent. If living he is quite old; I should like to find him.
I hope some time you may come to see us in Missouri. Give my love to Cousin Rosa. I think I wrote the last letter but presume she lost patience with my tardy answers. I hope she and you, too, have better health than I have ever had.
Would the muster roles [sic] be in Philadelphia? I shall be glad to hear from you again. I'm not always so tardy. Besides a member of the Bingham Family had written for Family history which I had just finished - twenty seven pages - when your letter came.
Yours sincerely,
Louise J. B. Neff

Notations in another handwriting on the original photocopy state that the writer was a daughter of Samanda (sic) McMahan Bingham, who was a daughter of Margaret Jones McMahan, who was a sister of Robert Jones of Utica, Mississippi, and Jesse Ruble Jones of Covington, Louisiana.

There are two discrepancies in the lists of daughters of David Jones and Jane Ruble. The list of Susan Jones included one named Lavinia and gave the married name of Rebecca as Bingham. Louise Neff named Melvina Jones Marcus, as the eldest, and did not list a sister named Lavinia. Since Mrs. Neff was closer to the sisters, all of whom resided in Missouri, it seems likely that one was named Melvina, not Lavinia. The Neff list also gives the married name of Rebecca Jones as Thorpe, instead of Bingham, and identified her as the mother of David Thorpe, which indicates that Susan Jones was in error in giving Bingham as the married name of Rebecca Jones. Since Louise Neff's father was a Bingham, it is likely that she would have mentioned a marriage by Rebecca to a Bingham, if one had occurred.

[NI0386] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Eva Mae Wyatt
Prepared by Brent Haroldsen
1251 Sprague Street, Manteca, California
November, 1998

BIRTH: The 1900 census, which calls her Effie, lists 2 June 1879 in Indiana, age 21. This census normally gave the month and year only and it is not clear if the 2 was a date or some kind of a note. In any case the birth date would have to be before June 16, the date of the census, for her to be 21. The 1880 census lists an Eva Mae Wyatt, age 11 months, that we believe is her. This census was taken between June 2 and 4 so it would indicate a birth date later in June than the 2nd. The 1920 Census lists age as 40 in January. All three say she and both parents were born in Indiana. Her marriage license in Missouri lists her age as 20 on 19 November 1898. This is not consistent with the other sources. A second marriage record in Kansas lists her age as 25 on November 23, 1904. On the death record for her stillborn son it lists her place of birth as born in Omaha, Nebraska. This could have been confused with Hazel, a sister-in-law living with the family on the 1920 census.

PARENTS: The 1900 and 1920 census records both say she was born in Indiana in 1879. We found only one Eva Mae Wyatt born that year on the 1880 Census Soundex for Indiana. We believe this is her although we have no corroborating evidence. The parents were Willis W. and Elizabeth Wyatt. Their marriage record lists her name as Elizabeth Ann Cooper. Willis was 27 years old on the 1880 census and 17 on the 1870 census. Both Censuses were taken in June so his birth was between June 1852 and June 1853. Elizabeth Ann Cooper was listed as 30 on the 1880 census. One correspondent, Rosetta Hotler, claims that Elizabeth is on the 1850 census in Jasper County, Indiana, age 2. We can not find her on that census, but the 1860 Census lists age 12 and 1870 lists age 22. She was probably born in 1848 and cheated on her age in 1880 because she was older than he was.

MARRIAGE: There are two separate marriage records. The first was in Jackson County, Missouri on 20 November 1898 between Oliver F. Marquis of Kansas City, Jackson County, Missouri and Eva M. Wyatt of Spring Hill, Johnson County, Kansas. The record includes the application for license, the license, and the confirmation of marriage. The second was in Wyandotte County, Kansas between Oliver T. Marquis and Eva M. Marquis. There is no reason to believe these are different spouses, but we do not know why they would have repeated the marriage. The dates and ages in the first marriage are not consistent. It says that he was 23 and she was 20. If he was born in April 1876, as all the other sources say, he would be 22 in November 1898. Similarly, all other sources say she was born in June 1879, which would make her 19. The 1900 census, which lists her name as Effie, says they were married 2 years. The census was taken in June, before their second anniversary. I would like to find them in 1910 census since it would also list how long they have been married.

CHILDREN: The 1920 census lists Carl R., Earnest K., Florence B., and Billie S. Carl Rhodes was born 6 January, 1908 in Rosedale, Wyandotte, Kansas and died 11 July, 1967 in West Palm Beach, Palm Beach, Florida. Mrs. Helen Eugenia Bearden Marquis (Jean), a sister-in-law, says he had twins who died shortly after birth and no other children. Rhodes is the maiden name of his great grandmother. We believe his wife's name was Thelma. Earnest K. Marquis was born 1912 in Kansas (presumably Rosedale, Wyandotte, Kansas) and died 15 June 1923 in Arcadia, DeSoto, Florida. Jean Marquis says he died from complication related to measles. Florence Elizabeth Marquis was born 15 September 1913 in Rosedale, Wyandotte, Kansas. She married B.J. Rogers. Jean Marquis says she died in 1976 in Texas. Billy Strand Marquis was born 8 August 1919 in Canal Point, Palm Beach, Florida and died 6 December 1969 in Alamo, Hidalgo, Texas. He married (1) Helen Eugenia Bearden on 26 August 1943. He later married (2) Sandra Ann Huttinson. There is a record of another son being born in Lake Worth, Palm Beach, Florida on 17 December 1915. The death record says stillborn, but there was a death record. Jean Marquis says there were several other children born before Carl who died as infants. These would be numbered in the 1910 census if we could find it. Jean Marquis also says that she died in childbirth when Billie was about 18 months old.

DEATH: Jean Marquis says that she died in childbirth when Billie was about 18 months old, which would have been about February 1921, and that she was buried in Arcadia, DeSoto, Florida near her son Earnest. Donna Haroldsen has a note from the DeSoto County chamber of commerce saying that there is a record of Frank O and Eva Marquis living on Polk Avenue above Pine Street in Arcadia in 1921. We have been unable to find the grave or any record of death. Funeral Home records burned and grave markers are all badly weathered. Although Jean Marquis would not have known her, she knew her husband. She says Grandpa Marquis used to talk about his wife being buried in a vault.

OTHER: Several sources list her name as Eva Mae Brown including the marriage license for her son, Billy S. Marquis, and the death certificate for her son, Carl Rhodes Marquis. Her marriage license and the delayed birth certificate for her daughter, Florence Elizabeth Marquis, list Eva Mae Wyatt and Eva Mae Wyitt, respectively. Jean Marquis, the wife of Billie, says her name was Wyatt and has no idea where the name Brown came from. There is an R.J. Brown listed next to Oliver Marquis in the 1900 census in Wyandotte, Kansas. He has a son born in Nebraska about the same time as James Herbert Marquis. Helen Marquis says Eva had sisters named Hazel and Edyth. Ron Marquis has patents awarded to Edyth Wyatt in Denver, but we can't find her there. Ed Marquis (Eva's brother-in-law) married a lady named Hazel in Kansas. Could she be the same Hazel?

CENSUS:
1880 Newton, IN Jackson twp ED130 sh8 Jun1880
Willis Wyatt 27 IN OH OH farmer
Elizabeth 30 IN IN IN
Eva 11/12 IN IN IN

1900 Wyandotte, KS GSF#1370389 ED171 Sh11 16Jun 1900
O.F. Marquis 24 Apr1876 KS KS KS
Effie 21 2Jun1879 IN IN IN married 2 yrs

1920 Pahokee, Palm Beach, FL ED138 SH4 L75 GSF#1820229 8-9Jan1920
Oliver F. Marquis 43 MO MO IN machinist
Eva M. 40 IN IN IN
Carl R. 11 KA MO IN
Earnest K. 8 KA MO IN
Florence B. 6 KA MO IN
Billie S. 5/12 FL MO IN

1920 West Palm Beach, FL ED143 s14 l49 12Jan
Issac N. Marquis 65 US watchmaker married
William E. 40 US
Hazel 30 NE daughterinlaw
Roy L. 21 KS

SOURCES:
U.S. Government 1900 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas, ED171, Sh11, 16 Jun 1900.
U.S. Government 1880 Census, Newton, Indiana, ED130, Sh8, 2-4 Jun 1880.
U.S. Government 1920 Census, Pahokee, Palm Beach, Florida, ED138, Sh4, 8-9 Jan 1920.
Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death #5421.
Marriages of Jasper County, Indiana, Book 1, #181.
U.S. Government 1870 Census, Jasper, Indiana, p576, 27 Jun 1870.
U.S. Government 1860 Census, Newton, Indiana, p852.
U.S. Government 1870 Census, Jasper, Indiana, p577, 29 July 1870.
Marriage License, Jackson County, Missouri Recorder, #17140.
Marriage Record, Wyandotte County, Kansas Office of the Probate Judge, Record 18, P446.
Florida Office of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death #60304.
Desoto County, Florida Death Record. Local Register #652, Book 5.
Kansas Division of Vital Statistics Certificate of Birth #27254. This is a delayed birth certificate.
Texas Bureau of Vital Statistics Certificate of Death #88468.
Alabama Marriage license #40817.

[NI0387] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: History Of Washington County Pennsylvania
Author: Boyd Crumrine
Publication Information: 1882
Call #: 974.882 H2c
Repository Name: Family History Library
Address: Salt Lake City, Utah

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Notes Of Mrs Flora Marquis Pyle
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

!George Marquis is said to have been a cousin of Thomas Marquis' children, thus his father would have been another child of William and Margaret who emigrated to the U.S. from Ireland in 1737. This is found in the files of Mrs. Flora Marquis Pyle, also Crumrine's History of Washington County, PA. Will of Robert Marques was written 6 Aug., 1785 and probated 3 May 1786 in Cecil Co., MD. Says he was from North Sisquanna, Cecil, MD. Lists kids as George, Robert, Samuel Marques, and Elinor Moor. Lists wife as Elinor. Betty Burgess sent a copy of an article from the Cecil Whig, 9 June 1976 talking about the Vensel's Independence Farm on the Jacob Tome Highway, Port Deposit owned by Dennis Vensel. The first recorded owner from a survey in 1786 was Robert Marquis. It is not known when he acquired the property. It says he died in 1786, and the 154 1/2 acres was sold in 1787 by his wife and executrix, Eleanor Marquis, to Capt. James Gordon Heron. The land was used to grow tobacco.

Will of Robert Marques Aug. 6, 1785, Cecil Co., Maryland

In the name of God amen I Robert Marques of North Sisquanna in Cecil County Province of Maryland former being of Perfect mind and memory blessed be God for all his mercies And calling to mind my mortality do make and ordain this my last will and Testament hereby revoking and disanuling all former and other wills made by me and this my last will and testament is in manner and form following. Impervious I will my soul in to the hands of a gracious God who gave it to my body to be buried in a decent manner at the discretion of my Executors not doubting that I shall recover the same again at the general Resurrection by the almighty power of God, and as to what worldly Estate it hath pleased God to bless me with I do order and dispose of the same as follows, First it is my will that all my debts and personal charges be paid timely. It is my will that each of my children Viz: GEORGE, ROBERT, SAMUEL MARQUES, and ELINOR MOOR, each of them shall have one silver dollar of my estate paid them. Then all the remaining part of my estate both real and personal I give and bequeath to my well beloved wife, Elinor Marquis to be disposed of by her at pleasure. Lastly, I hereby nominate, constitute, and appoint the aforesaid, Elinor Marques, my well beloved wife my whole and sole Executrices of this my last will and testament to see the same executed per form according to the true interest and meaning thereof . In witness of the whole I have hereunto set my hand and affixed my seal the sixth day August Anno Domini one thousand seven hundred and eighty five 1785.

/s/ Robert Marques (seal)

Signed sealed and declared by said Robert Marques to be his last will and testament in the presence of us: James Evans, William McKnight, John N. Laverly (his mark)

Cecil County towit May 3d 1786 then came Elinor Marques and made oath on the holy Enangels of Almighty God that the foregoing is the true and whole last will and testament of Robert Marques late of said county deceased that hath come to her hand and possession and that she doth not know of any other. Sworn before David Smith

Cecil County towit May 3d 1786 then came James Evans, one of the subscribing witnesses as the last will and testament of Robert Marques late of said county deceased and makes oath on the holy Enangels of Almighty God that he saw the said deceased sign and make this will, that they heard him publish, pronounce, and declare the same to be his last will and testament, that at the time of his doing so, he was to the best of his apprehension of sound and disposing mind, memory, and understanding, and that William McKnight and John Lafferty subscribed their names as witnesses to this will in the presence and at the request of the tester and in the presence of each other. Sworn before David Smith Cecil County towit June 2, 1786 then came John Lafferty, one of the subscribing witnesses of the within will and made oath on the holy Enangels of Almighty God as before proved by James Evans.

George and Samuel operated a ferry boat from the river landing between Lonesome Hollow on the Jefferson County, Indiana side of the Ohio river and Milford, Kentucky about 1812.

I have found several references to George being a cousin of Thomas MARQUIS' children:

History of the First Presbyterian Church of Bellefontaine, Ohio, p 236: William mr Margaret _________, came fr Ireland to Opequon Valley, near Winchester, Frederick Co., Va, in 1720. Chn, Thomas, Mary, mr John Wilson, she d at birth of only child; George, Samuel, John, and Thomas of Western Pa., were prob his grandsons by other sons

First Families of the Cross Creek Country, The REA family, by A. D. White: George Marquis, a cousin of the other Cross Creek Marquises, bought the 196-acre tract from John Marshall, but, according to records, he held possession for only about two years, then selling it to Mr. Rea.

Commemorative Biographical Record, Washington County, Pennsylvania, by J. H. Beers & Co., p 184: There were some others of the name of Marquis who lived in this county, and were cousins of the children of Thomas and Mary (Colville) Marquis. George Marquis was one of the first bench elders of Cross Creek Church. Samuel Marquis also lived near to Burgettstown, and John also lived in the same neighborhood. If these were first cousins of John and Rev. Thomas Marquis, as they claimed, William Marquis, who came from Ireland in 1720, must have left other children in Ireland, who came to America at a later period; and this appears most likely to be the case as all these parties came from near Winchester, Va, to this county.

History of Washington County, Pennsylvania; by Boyd Crumrine, p 724: George Marques was among the early settlers of Cross Creek. On Nov. 1, 1776, he bought from Thomas Bay a tract of land on Cross Creek containing two hundred and sixty acres; also Sept. 18, 1787, he bought of John Marshall a tract of one hundred and ninety-six acres. He was one of the first elders in Cross Creek Presbyterian Church, and was leader of the music. He was a cousin of John and Rev. Thomas Marquis. He afterwards sold his land and removed to Mercer Co., PA., in which section a number of his descendants still reside.

Rollins R. Marquis History: ...that John, George, and Samuel were either brothers of Thomas or his nephews, and so cousins of John and Rev. Thomas.

My ggg-grandfather, Robert (son of George, son of Robert) named his oldest son George Wilson MARQUIS, supposedly because he wanted to honor John Wilson for raising Thomas Marquis' children.

[NI0388] # ID: I11819
# Name: Elinor Unknown 1 2
# Sex: F
# Death: AFT 3 MAY 1786 1 2
# Reference Number: 13112

Marriage 1 Robert Marquis b: ABT 1718

Children

1. Has No Children Robert Marquis
2. Has Children Elinor Marquis
3. Has No Children Samuel Marquis b: 1761


Marriage 2 Robert Marquis

Children

1. Has No Children Robert Marquis b: in Maryland
2. Has Children George Marquis b: 18 SEP 1747 in Maryland
3. Has Children Samuel A Marquis b: 1761 in Maryland
4. Has Children Elinor Marquis b: BEF 1765


Sources:

1. Title: 684427.ged
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 6, 2002
2. Title: wood.FTW
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 20, 2002

[NI0389] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Ancestral file. 977.851 V3cr lists Jane as Spouse of David.

Prepared by William G. Scroggins, 718 Mill Valley Drive, Taylor Mill, KY 41015-2278; revised 22 March 1995.
Jane Ruble who married David Jones was a daughter of Owen Thomas Ruble and his first wife Helen (Helena) White. Alice Woodrum Wade, widow of John Utley Wade, married (2) Owen Thomas Ruble whose Franklin County, Virginia, will was dated 06 March 1824 and proved on 06 December 1824. Witnesses were Castleton Wade, John Hale and Jacob Troup. His legatees were his wife Ally, her daughter Polly W. Wade, and his own children, Jane (Jean) Jones, Thomas W. Ruble, Elizabeth Hall, Swinfield Ruble and Margaret (Marget) Conner. William Jones and John Jones were named as executors. Abraham Jones and Robert Hairston were securities on the executor's bond. (Franklin County, Virginia Will Book 2, pgs 619-629)

Cemetery Records of Cooper Co, MO, Vol VI, 977.851 Vc3r: William Reed Family Cemetery:
JONES, Jane, b. May 22, 1763; d. Nov. 1, 1838; wife of David Jones

[NI0390] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Information from William G. Scroggins, 1718 Mill Valley Dr., Taylor Mill, KY.

Robert Jones III was a Baptist preacher and so was his son Jesse. Martha Riley may have come from Frederick County.

As Robert Jones, Jr., Robert Jones III made a deposition before a special court held at Mayes Ferry (later Booker's Ferry) on 01 June 1758 about an engagement with some Shawnee Indians in which he participated:

Halifax CountyAt Mays's Ferry on Staunton River June the 1st, 1758 ...to wit John Wheeler, William Verdiman, John Hall, Richard Thompson, William Verdiman, Junr, Robert Jones Junr, and Henry Snow being first sworn ... deposed in Substance as followeth ... that when they arrived at the [Staunton] River Bank they as they imagined heard the Indians War Halloo on the other side, that they proceeded to pass the River, that when they gott over, on rising the Bank on the other side, they found a small fire just kindled, and at some little distance from thence, they observed the Enemy, upon which all the Deponents say that Old William Verdiman aged about sixty, went foremost, and that they all followed close at his heels, that when they came up to the Enemy they found they had tyed their Horses, pretty many in Number to the Bushes, that most of the Indians were painted and others then painting, some black some Red, but mostly black, that when they came near Old Verdiman pulled off his Hatt and Bowed and accosted them in terms of peace, and Friendship, and said Gentlemen we come in a Brotherly manner to ask you for our Horses, and other Goods, that you have taken from us, and the Indians gave a kind of Grunt, and appeared determined for mischief, stripped themselves threw out the priming of their Guns, fresh primed and Cocked them, struck their Tomahawks into Trees, and in an angry manner demanded of the Deponents if they would fight; that whilst Verdiman who was still uncovered Bowing and Treating with them, the Enemy Indeavored to Inviron them, and actually got them into a half Circle before the Deponents were aware upon which, and young Verdiman observing that two Indians had pointed their Guns, they the Deponents all retreated backwards with their Faces to the Enemy, and took to trees, that on their retreat, the Indians threw their Tomahawks, and that two of them narrowly missed two of their men, that one of them would have hitt Old Verdiman, but that he luckely parried it with an Elder Stick he had in his hand (for he was one of the number of those that had no Guns) and the Indians pursuing and they retreating in Order, they were near drove to the River Banck, where they must have inevitably perished had they then attempted to have crossed, that on the retreat a Gun was fired upon which the Engagement insued, and many Guns discharged on both sides, in which Engagement the Father of John Hall one of the deponents fell, and being mortally wounded soon after died, that during the Engagement those of the Deponents who had Guns were obliged to fly from tree to tree to one another for a shott of Powder and Lead both being very scarce among them, that in the Engagement three Indians fell, that at last their Powder and Lead being Expended they fled back over the River in different places, and being all met again on the other side, they went to a Neighbours House, supplied themselves with more Ammunition, and went back again to place where the Engagement was to look for their wounded friend, who they found expiring, three Indians dead in the Field and much plunder, that they scalped the Indians, threw their dead bodies in the River, and brought away their dying friend and the plunder, and that their Friend soon after dyed, the account of Spoil found in the Field consisting of Horses, Saddles, Bridles, Mens and Womens apparel &c., is herewith Contained in two papers Numbered 1. 2.

When Jesse Ruble Jones wrote in 1877 about his great grandparents, as they were in 1796, he recollections were of his last seeing them before migrating to Kentucky with his father. Jesse visited Franklin County, Virginia, in 1859 and met two young grandsons of Thomas Jones and great-grandsons of Robert Jones and Mary Van Meter. They informed him that Robert Jones, son of Henry Jones and Frances Bohannon , was then living in Floyd County, Virginia.

R. E. Jones, MD New Orleans La May 6th 1877
Dear Nephew
I received yours of the 2nd instant and was very glad to hear from you - We are all in good health and much elated at the change in our political affairs - I think that affairs in the South will now commence to improve. We, as well as most of the Citizens of Louisiana, have suffered much in our pecuniary affairs. We, however, have been able to save our real Estate which I think will soon become productive. I think a large Southern immigration will commence shortly. If our farmers would plant a third Crop in Cotton it would fetch more money. I think Mississippi and Louisiana should raise Corn for exportation. I have observed in my travel North and even West that the towns are growing too fast for the Country. Two thirds of the lands in some of the Northern States are uncultivated and growing up in Timber. We find that our poorest lands with good culture will produce more than the average lands in the New England States. Our last Legislature (illegible) passed reform laws which will lessen expenses of the State government at least to one half after they become operative.
With regard to our ancestors, my great grand father came from Wales when a boy to Montgomery County Virginia about the year 1700 - When grown he married Mary Van Metre and had four sons Abraham, Thomas, Robert and Henry. I never heard of any daughters. His name was Robert. in [sic] 1796 when I was about 8 years old I saw him and his wife, each supposed to be 100 years old, in good health appearing to have their faculties unimpaired. I recollect his entertaining me and other children in telling us of some inci[dences] of his boyhood age. They both lived several years after. I visited the place of my birth Franklin County in 1859 and there met two young men Grandsons of Thomas Jones. They informed me that a son of Henry Jones was a then living in Floyd County named Robert.
My Grandfather Robert Jones married a Miss Riley they had Four sons Elijah who moved to Georgia. Jesse who lived in the same neighborhood until 1859 and died at the age of 104. he [sic] was a Baptist Preacher. I heard him preach in 1796 and I was told he preached a Month before he died. One of Father's brothers named Isaac moved to Clay County Ky about 1800. I have not heard of since another Jonathan. I think must have died young as could not hear of him in Virginia. My father had three sisters Mary who married Wm McVity [sic] had one son named John was a Methodist Preacher. Elizabeth married Thurman and Tabitha married Hale.
My Grandfather Robert Jones was a Baptist Preacher. I think he died in Virginia about 1820.
My Mother Jane Ruble was daughter of Owen Ruble of German extraction. He commanded a Company of Militia at the taking of York Town. my [sic] father was a Subaltern in his Company - Major Turly [sic] son of my sister Elizabeth once wrote me that he was wearing the sword which my father wore at Yorktown. My mother's mother was Helena White born in Scotland her brother Alexander White of Winchester Virginia was member of the first Congress. I own an Eddition [of] Blackstone published by subscription before the Revolution. He gave it to my uncle Thos W Ruble who gave it to me. Grandmother Ruble was well educated. I was told she taught her sons the dead Languages. My Mother had two brothers Thos W and Swingfield and Two Sisters Elizabeth who married Hale and Margaret who married Conner both Sisters moved to Ky and left children.
Thos W Ruble had a son John who moved to Texas he had two Daughters who married in Louisville. I do not know the names of the men they married.
My father and mother married at the ages of 16 and 18 years lived together within a few months of 60 years. They had Two Sons and nine Daughters.
I have heard nothing of the Family since the war
If you have any information as to the present situation of our relations in Missouri I would take it as a great favor if you would write me the particulars. My love to your Family Grandmother and connections.
Jesse R Jones

[Some punctuation added for clarity.] The envelope was postmarked in Covington, Louisiana.

In writing that his grandfather Robert Jones married Miss Riley and had four sons and three daughters, Jesse R. Jones failed to include his father as one of them. He also appears not to have known that Robert Jones and Mary Van Meter had sons named John, Isaac and Abraham.

Subsequently, on 25 November 1902 Susan B. Jones of Covington, Louisiana, an unmarried daughter of Jesse R. Jones, wrote to her cousin Clara Jones in Crystal Springs, Mississippi:
Covington Nov 25th 1902
My dear Cousin
We received your letter and we were very glad to hear from you, as it had been a long time since we had done so. For the last twelve years, Serena and I have lived alone in the old home in Covington, and we only go to New Orleans two or three times a year, for a week or two at a time. We look on it now as quite a journey. All three of our nephews, James, Frank and Charlie are dead, but our two nieces, Arsine and Laura live in Covington, not far from us. After the death of our brother James, with whom they lived on a farm four miles from here, they moved into Covington. James (or Boy as he was always called) left two sons, Frank, the oldest, and Charlie, who lives with his aunts, Arsine and Laura, and is a very fine young man. Poor Frank is a hopeless invalid, an incurable disease of the spine which has paralyzed his lower limbs. He is now at Hot Springs, Ark. and the Doctors say that he may die at any time, or he may live for some months.
As to our relations, we regret that we did not write down what my Father used to tell us about them, for I am afraid that we cannot tell you much more than you already know. My Father's great, great grandfather came from Wales early in 1700 and settled near Winchester, Virginia. Pa remembered his great grandfather, and great grandmother (who were then more than ninety years old) and used to tell him anecdotes of their childhood in Wales. Afterwards Pa's grandfather moved to Franklin County, Virginia, near the little town of Rocky Mount, where Pa was born and some of his nine sisters. In 1795 Grandfather Jones moved (and a number of his neighbors) to Madison County, Ken - in the Bluegrass region. When my grandfather moved to Ken - he sold the farm in Virginia to a Mr. Saunders, whose descendants still own and live on it. When we were at one of the Virginia Springs in 1859, Pa rode over to see the old place. Pa removed with his father to Ken - and was educated there until he was twenty one (1808) then his health was delicate, and he was advised to come to a warmer climate. he came to Miss - near Natchez, where he remained three years. Then he moved to Covington in 1811, and began to practice law. Afterwards, Grandfather Jones moved (I do not know in what year) to Missouri, with his nine daughters, and Uncle Robert, who I think was born in Ken. Pa's mother was named Jane Ruble and her father had a farm in the same neighborhood in Virginia. As Pa never had any of the Family records, we do not know the names of the any of the wives of the different ancestors, except I think, one was named Van Meter. Pa had a copy of Blackstone, one of the first edition ever published in the United States, which was given to Grandfather Jones by one of his ancestors, to whom it belonged (Alexander White who was a member of the first Continental Congress, which ratified the Declaration of Independence). The names of our Aunts were Rebecca - Anna - Elizabeth - Martha - Helena - Margaret - Lavinia - Lydia and Jane. The married names were Rebecca Bingham - Anna Reid - Ferrell - Turley - Helena McMahon (and another married a McMahon) Thorpe - Lydia Allison and Jane Jones, (the Jones she married was no relation). I think Uncle Robert was one of the younger children. Pa used to receive letters occasionally from his surviving sisters, until the war interrupted the intercourse. He heard, however, that all of his nephews, who were of a suitable age, were in the Confederate army, which gratified him very much, as you know Missouri was so divided. At one time a cousin of Pa's (Dr. Josiah Hale) was Professor of Botany in the Medical College in New Orleans. He was a very scientific man, and a very nice old gentleman, but he died a year or two before the war. He was a celebrated botanist, and we often see his opinion quoted as an authority. I am sorry to say that we cannot tell you anything about the Robertsons, except that we have heard Ma say that her sister Serena was only fourteen years old, when she married Nathaniel Robertson in Georgia. Grandfather Ragan lived on a farm, and had a flour mill also, near Milledgeville, but moved his Family to Mississippi, (I think about 1814) Covington County. We send you a picture of my Father. I am sorry that we have no better one. He never took well, and always disliked to sit for his picture. We would send you one of ours, if we had one, but we have had none taken for thirty five years, and those were all given away at the time. In the summer, sometime, cannot you and Cousin Lizzie pay us a visit. We should be very glad to see you. The pine woods in winter look very bare and desolate, but in summer the country looks more attractive, and then too the trains arrive here before dark. When you come, write to us a few days before, and we will meet you at the train. Serena joins me in love to you, Cousin Lizzie and the children.
Your affectionate Cousin
Susan B. Jones

[NI0392] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Immigrated from Montgomeryshire, Wales in 1698 (no documentation). Settled in what is Montgomery County, Virginia. Also early settler of Montgomery County,PA. Probably had more daughters.

Robert Jones, Jr. has been identified, without documentation, as the son of Robert Jones who came to America from Montgomeryshire, Wales, in 1698, when Robert, Jr. was about two years old. Mary Van Meter, who was baptized in the Reformed Dutch Church at Somerville (Raritan), New Jersey, on 26 April 1709, was a daughter of John Van Meter and his first wife Sarah Bodine.

The identities of the children of Robert Jones and Mary Van Meter have not been proved absolutely but an analysis of all records in Franklin County, Virginia, pertaining to the early settlers there named Jones, geographical and chronological circumstantial evidence, naming patterns, and tradition indicate that the above relationships are valid. They probably had other daughters.

On 06 May 1877, Jesse Ruble Jones, an attorney who resided in Covington, Louisiana, wrote a letter from New Orleans to his nephew Dr. Robert Elam Jones of Crystal Springs, Mississippi, in which he states that he saw his great-grandparents Robert Jones and Mary Van Meter (Metre) in 1796 when he was about 8 years old and they supposedly were 100 years old. Both were in good health, with unimpaired faculties, and lived for several years afterward. His great-grandfather entertained him and he other children with stories about his boyhood. Jesse Jones stated that his great-grandfather Robert Jones came from Wales when a boy and settled in Montgomery County, Virginia, about 1700. Montgomery County, in southwestern Virginia, was not formed until 1777, from Fincastle County, which also gave rise, at the same time, to Washington and Kentucky counties. That area was not occupied by whites in 1700. Robert and Mary Van Meter Jones came to southwestern Virginia from Frederick County in that colony, and some members of their Family subsequently resided in Montgomery County, which may account for the later misunderstanding. Some Family historians have said that Robert Jones first settled near Winchester, Virginia, about 1698. These claims must have been based erroneously on subsequent residency in that area and could not be the original settlement of the Family in America. White settlement of the Shenandoah Valley in northern Virginia, where Winchester is located in Frederick County, did not begin until about 1732. John Van Meter, father-in-law of Robert Jones, Jr., was among the first frontiersmen to enter the area. Some of the families who settled in the Shenandoah Valley previously lived in the part of Prince George's County, Maryland, that became Frederick County, Maryland, in 1748. Montgomery County, Maryland, was established from Frederick County in 1776. Many of these families also previously lived in Chester and Philadelphia counties, Pennsylvania. The province of Pennsylvania was divided into three counties in 1682, Bucks, Chester and Philadelphia. Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, was created from Philadelphia County in 1784. The reference to Montgomery County, Virginia, could be a mistaken reference to Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, where Robert Jones was an early settler on Perkiomen Creek when it still was in Philadelphia County. Jost Hite, a pioneer settler of the Shenandoah Valley and a relative, by marriage, of John Van Meter, previously lived on Perkiomen Creek which suggests that Robert Jones who lived on Perkiomen was either he who married Mary Van Meter or his father. No dates of residence were given.

Robert Jones of Perkiomen apparently moved to Chester County, Pennsylvania, where he was taxed in Marlborough Township for 2 shillings and 6 pence, in 1715. On 27 May 1729 the township was divided and one of the new boundaries, running north from Marlborough Street, was along "... land late of Robert Jones ..." This also must pertain to Robert Jones who married Mary Van Meter, or his father, because Caleb Pusey and John Strode, members of whose families married sisters of Mary Van Meter Jones, were neighbors of Robert Jones in Marlborough Township.

Use of the term "late" could indicate that Robert Jones died before 27 May 1729, which could apply to Robert, Sr., or that he had moved to Maryland, where Robert, Jr. and Mary Van Meter, who were married about 1730, resided. The original source was not identified, but Robert Jones who married Mary Van Meter was described as having lived on Perkiomen Creek in Pennsylvania in the early 1720's. He was appointed, with John Van Meter, a constable of Monocacy Hundred in Maryland. On 27 February 1733, Robert Jones and Henry Ballinger appraised the estate of Joseph Hedges, who lived on the Monocacy River above Tuscarora Creek in Prince George's County, Maryland. Robert Jones was listed among persons who had not burned their tobacco according to Maryland law in 1734, and signed several road petitions while residing in the Monocacy area. In 1740 he signed a petition for a road from Tuscarora Creek to the mouth of Catoctin Creek and on to Antietam Creek, with a bridge over the Catoctin. Robert Jones, Robert Baker and Jacob Neff witnessed the will of William Hedges, who died in January 1743. Robert Jones and John Middah inventoried his estate on 06 March 1743. Robert Jones, husband of Mary Van Meter, daughter of John Van Meter, moved to Virginia with the Van Meter and Hite families.

Robert and Mary Van Meter Jones moved to Orange County, Virginia, before 13 October 1736. The area of Virginia, where the Jones and Van Meters lived was in Essex County until 1721, when it became Spotsylvania County. It became Orange County in 1734 and Frederick County in 1743.

It is not known when Robert Jones moved to Lunenburg County, Virginia, but he was among the early explorers of the area:

1754. Surveyed for John Ward (Albemarle Co.) 400 acres on the south fork of Mayo River beginning at White Oak, marked R.I., near a camping place where Robert Jones camped and made said camp of White Walnut puncheons.

The I. in R.I. probably was an old-fashioned J. The Mayo River flows into North Carolina from the southwestern part of Henry County.

Robert Jones and Mary Van Meter apparently settled on the Pigg River in 1747. He is shown twice on a map of early settlers in Franklin County, Virginia. His name appears, with the date 1747, between the Pigg River and the head of Fox Run and also downstream from this spot in this generalized presentation. This area was in Lunenburg County in 1747.

Robert Jones later acquired 200 acres of land on Runnet Bag Creek, now in southwestern Franklin County:

Robert Jones appears on a Lunenburg County tithe list in 1748

Robert and Thomas Jones who were assessed together in 1748 must have been brothers, since Robert Jones' son Thomas was not born until 1748. By 1749 the elder Thomas apparently was living on his own land. He probably was Thomas Jones, Sr. of Franklin County, Virginia, who is on the map of early settlers as having settled there in 1747. His land was near Robert Jones, John Utley Wade and William Cook.

This part of Lunenburg became Halifax County in 1752. On 09 November 1752 Robert and Mary Van Meter Jones of Halifax County sold the tract of land in Frederick County that she inherited from her father and they appeared in Frederick County Court to acknowledge their deed.

At a Court continued and held for Frederick County on Thursday the 9th Day of November 1752 Robert Jones & Mary his wife in open Court acknowledged this their Deed of Feoffment with a Receipt of Livery & Seizin endowed to Edward Lucas and Mary the wife of ... Robert Jones being first privately examined & in Court relinquished her Right of Dower ...

At a Court continued & held for Frederick County on Thursday the 9th Day of Novr 1752 Robert Jones in open Court acknowledged his Bond for performing covenants to Edward Lucas which on the motion of the sd Edward was admitted to Record Teste J Wood Cl

The inclusion of John Jones in this transaction as heir-at-law indicates that he was the eldest son of Robert Jones and Mary Van Meter who had a vested right in his parent's property under the law of primogeniture.

Robert Jones was recommended as a Justice of the Peace for Halifax County in May 1752 and March 1753. He was appointed on 19 June 1753.

Robert Jones apparently was the subject of an episode narrated in the journal of a Moravian minister, who was travelling, with eleven other Moravians, from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, to Wachovia, North Carolina, in 1753. En route, the group visited with Robert Johnsen, a Welshman, after crossing the Blackwater River in Virginia. Since Johnsen is not a Welsh name, the Moravian diarist, who wrote in German, probably identified the surname of their host, Robert Jones, as Johnsen (Jones' son). The Moravians reached the Roanoke (Runoke) River by 400PM on 01 November 1753:

Nov. 5 - ... At half a mile was a small creek, and another half mile brought us to Black Water, a large creek with very steep banks. ... Then the road turned to the left up the mountain but we missed it and came more to the right to an old millrace at Ringfros Mill, kept to the left of it and turned up the mountain again and regained our proper road ... One mile further we reached the home of Robert Johnsen, and bought some hay from him. He went half a mile with us to show us the way across the creek, and a pleasant place in which to pitch our tent. Our course today was west and south-west, and we made 16 miles; ... It is 25 miles from here to Smith's River.

Nov. 6 - We took up our journey; Br. Hermanus remained behind to thrash oats for Mr. Johnsen ... Mr. Johnsen, a Welshman, had spoken freely with Br. Hermanus, had first asked him how he had come to join the Moravians, and when Br. Hermanus had told him he began to relate his own story for the last few years. At one time he had become very uneasy and could hardly bear the distress of his heart; then he had turned with all his misery to the Saviour, and He had let him feel the power of His blood and that had given him peace, and so it was with him to this day. And if at any time his heart was not quite right with God he turned again to the Saviour, and all was well. It was the same with his wife and eldest son. He had spoken of this only to those in whom he felt and saw the same spirit, and for the World understands as little of such things as a horse, and therefore he kept silence. For nine years he had not heard a sermon; and he begged that when one of us should pass this way again he would stop with him. We all rejoiced when Br. Hermanus told us this, and were glad that also in this dark wilderness the Saviour had his people, who loved him. At night we set up our tent in the swamp ... Br. Gottlob held evening prayers, and then we lay down to rest.

Ringfros Mill undoubtedly represents a misunderstanding of the name Rentfro. The fact that the Moravians mentioned speaking to Robert Johnsen's eldest son indicates that he was an adult, which supports the birth of John Jones in about 1733. The distances stated in the journal reflect the twisting nature of their pathways, since it is only about eight miles between the Pigg and Smith rivers, as the crow flies.

Since it was reported that Robert Johnsen had not heard a sermon in nine years, perhaps Robert Jones left the settled area of Frederick County about 1744. Because the sons of Robert Jones were Baptists, perhaps Robert and Mary attended the Primitive Baptist Church at or near Gerrards Town in the part of Frederick County that became Berkeley County, Virginia, before moving south. Established in 1743, it was the first Primitive Baptist Church west of the Blue Ridge.

On 19 February 1754 Robert Jones, William Wright and Joseph Moore witnessed a deed from Daniel Green of Antrim Parish, Halifax County, planter, to John Legrand of the same place, for 445 acres on the north side of Difficult Creek, for 70 pounds.

On 22 August 1758, during a patrol along the frontier, the Halifax militia company of Captain Robert Wade spent the night at the plantation of Robert Jones, which was described as being at the head of Pigg River:

... Capt. Robert Wade march't from Mayo Fort with 35 men in order to take a range to the New River in search of our enemy Indians. We marcht about three miles that day to a Plantation where Peter Rentfro formerly lived and took up camp. Next morning we marcht along to a place called Gobling Town where we Eat our Brakefast, and so continued our march and took up our camp that night at the Foot of the Blew Ledge (Blue Ridge).

Next Day we crossed the Blew Ledge and marched to Francis Eason's Plantation and continued there that night. Our hunters brought in a plentiful supply of venison. Next morning being Tuesday the 15th we marcht down to Richard Ratcliff's plantation on Meadow Creek where we continued the night. Next morning sent out Spyes and hunters to Spy for enemy signs and to hunt for provisions.

This report was written by John Echols who went on to state that they stayed at Ratcliff's for several days. One day five Indians came upon them unexpectedly and Echols noted that the Indians:

... stood in amaise and Reason they had, for I suppose there were twenty guns presented at them. They said they were Cherokees. I made signs to them to shew me their Pass But they had none. They had with them five head of horse and Skelps that appeared to be white men. Four of the horses appeared as tho' they had been recently taken, the other was vary poor.

The Captain decided to let the Indians go, which displeased his followers, so he sent twelve men after them. They were overtaken in an orchard, where four Indians were killed and one wounded. Finding many Indian signs about and running low on ammunition, the company decided to return home. On Tuesday the 22nd they ate dinner on Blackwater Creek and spent the night at Robert Jones' Plantation at the head of Pigg River. The company split up here and returned to Mayo Fort by different routes.

Goblintown Creek is south of the Smith (Irvine) River in present-day Patrick County, where the Mayo River rises.

Robert Jones and Mary Van Meter were residents of Bedford County, Virginia, on 19 June 1760 when they sold their 315-acre tract of land at the fork of the Pigg River in Halifax County to Joseph Rentfro.

Robert Jones, Jr. was registered as a voter in Halifax County in 1765 as Robert Jones, with his son Robert Jones III listed as Robert, Jr.

The Jones apparently resided in the part of Halifax County that became Pittsylvania County in 1767, because they do not appear on the 1768 list of Halifax voters.
The 1769 tithe list for Pittsylvania County indicates that two of the sons of Robert Jones and Mary Van Meter, who were of titheable age, were living at home in 1769, and two others were residing nearby, since they were listed sequentially. Isaac Jones appears on another list. Since Abraham was unlisted, he probably was under 16 years of age.

The lands of Robert Jones were in western Lunenburg County where parts later fell into Halifax, Bedford and Franklin counties when the new jurisdictions were established. Lunenburg County emerged from Brunswick County in 1746. Halifax County was erected in 1752 from Lunenburg County. Bedford County was formed in 1754 from parts of Lunenburg and Albemarle counties. Albemarle came from Goochland County in 1744. Pittsylvania County originated in 1767 from Halifax County and Henry County was cut from Pittsylvania in 1777. Franklin County was created from parts of Bedford and Henry counties in 1786.

On 27 October 1785 Robert Jones (Jr.) and two of his sons, Henry Jones and Robert Jones (III), who signed as "Jr.," were among 282 men who signed a petition urging the formation of a new county because they found it "extremely inconvenient attending their publick and necessary Business, by reason of bad roads, and their Remote situation from the Court House." Franklin County was created from Henry and Bedford counties the following year.

One of the patents obtained by Robert Jones, Jr. for land in southern Virginia, was numbered (or dated) 1753.

It has been said that Robert Jones, Jr. was a soldier in the Revolutionary War and was at Yorktown when Cornwallis surrendered but, born about 1696, he probably was too old for more than local militia duty. Perhaps this service pertains to Robert Jones III.

[NI0393] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Baptismal date 17 April 1709, Somerset County, NJ, Reformed Dutch Church at Somerville (Raritan) NJ.

[NI0394] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Jan Joosten van Meteren is the Dutch version of his name. Baptized 14 Oct 1683 Kingston, Ulster County, New York. Was the second person to wettle in Frederick County, Maryland, on land which the settler owned peronally, where the city of Frederick stands today. The survey for his land was dated 21 Apr 1724. In 1729,1731, 1732, and 1734, he ws appointed by the Courts as Constable of Monocacy Hundred. His will was sritten 13 August 1745, and proved in Frederick County, 03 September 1745.

[NI0396] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Will dated 6 Mar 1824, proved 6 Dec 1824, Franklin County, Virginia. Witnesses were Castleton Wade, John Hale, and Jacob Troup. Legatees were his wife, Ally, her daughter Polly W. Wade, and his own children Jane Jones, Thomas W. Ruble, Elizabeth Hall, Swinfield Ruble, and Margaret Conner. William Jones and John Jones were named as executor. Abraham Jones and Robert Hairston were securities on the bond. He was a captain in the Revolutionary War.
******
The 1786 Franklin County, Virginia Personal Property Tax List
Transcribed by Jeffrey C. Weaver, July 26, 1998
Owen Ruble
No. Tithes 7
Whites>21 1
Whites 16-21 0
Slaves>16 6
Slaves <16 6
Horses 25
Cattle 21

[NI0397] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Ancestral file says she was born in Chester, PA. The letter from Jesse Jones says she was born in Scotland.

[NI0398] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Dr. Robert White was one of the fist settlers near North Mountain, west of Winchester, VA, where he established White's Fort, which was used during the French and Indian War. He was educated at Edinburg, Scotland, and before coming to America, he had been a surgeon in the British Navy.

On a visit to his relatives in Delaware (William and Barbara Hoge), he fell in love with their daughter, Margaret, and married her, deciding to make his home in America. They had three prominent sons, Jude John White, Col. Robert White, and Alexander, who was a lawyer and a member of the Continental Congress, that adopted the Constitution of the United States.

"Historical Records of Old Frederick & Hampshire Counties, Virginia" by Wilmer Kerns, Heritage Books, Inc. Bowie, MD 1992

"History of the Julian Family i America," from the Jeannette R. Trotter Papers, McClung Historical Collection.
********
A Genealogical History of the Dunlevy Family
Author: Gwendolyn Dunlevy Kelley
Call Number: CS71.D86

Page 222

WHITE GENEALOGY. DR. ROBERT WHITE. Born in Scotland in 1688. Died in America in 1752, aged 64. Was a surgeon in the British Navy and graduated at Edinburgh. Emigrated to America about 1670. Visited William Hoge in Delaware and there married MARGARET HOGE. Eldest daughter of William Hoge. Born (???), d. (???). Moved to Winchester, Va., about 1735. Dr. Robert White is buried in the old Opequon Church.

P 223
THE WHITE FAMILY (AND NOTES ON THE HOGE NAME.)
THE SETTLING IN WINCHESTER, VIRGINIA.

Foote says (page 457): "About the year 1735, Wm. Hoge removed from Pennsylvania, and settled on the Opeckon, three miles south of Winchester, Va., (Frederick County). Opeckon meeting house stands upon his tract of land.

The families of Glass, Vance, Allen, Colvin, White and others soon joined him and formed the Opeckon congregation, the oldest west of the Blue Ridge."

These names are all found in the early records of the Scotch-Irish of Pennsylvania."

(Dr. Robert White married Margaret Hoge, eldest daughter of William Hoge.)

THE WHITE FAMILY
(Extract from Hayden's "Virginia Genealogies." (Page 457), "Excussus Vance."
"The Virginia Vances were of Scotch-Irish descent. They emigrated to Virginia, through Pennsylvania from the North of Ireland. Foote says: "About the year 1735, William Hoge removed from Pennsylvania and settled upon the Opeckon, three miles south of Winchester, Va., (Frederick County. Opeckon meeting house stands upon his tract of land. The families of Glass, Vance, Allen, Colvin, White and others soon joined him, and formed the Opeckon congregation, the oldest west of the Blue Ridge."

(Sketches of Virginia S. 1, p. 102.) These names are all found in the early records of the Scotch-Irish of Pennsylvania, especially in Lauer and Dauph. Counties."

(P. 401.) Andrew Littlepage married "Mary Page, daughter of John and Judith (Braxton) White; granddaughter of Reverend Alexander White of St. David's Par., K. W. Co., Va."

WHITE
(From Virginia Records, State Library, from Wm. T. Robins of "Virginia Historical Society.

"Dr. Robert White came to this country about the year 1720, having been born in Scotland in 1688. He was for some time a surgeon in British Navy. After coming to this country he married a Miss Hoge and in his later years removed to Frederick County, Virginia.

He died leaving three sons; Alexander, John and Robert. There is no mention of daughters. Alexander was a prominent lawyer and politician; John a soldier of the Revolution, and was the father of Robert, who became the most distinguished of the family. He was a United States Court Judge and was widely and favorably known."
Authority: (Page 565 and on)--"History of Lower Shenandoah Valley."

P224
ANCESTRY OF HANNAH WHITE (MRS. ANTHONY DUNLEVY).

(Letter to G. D. Kelley from Wm. M. Atkinson, (attorney-at-law, judge of county court of Frederick County and of the corporation court) of Winchester, Virginia. (February 21, 1899.)

"If your ancestress, Hannah White, was the person you think, we have a common ancestor.

The first White in our family that we know of here was one Dr. Robert White. When exactly he emigrated to America we do not know, but we believe about the year 1720. He was born in Scotland in the year 1688 and graduated at Edinburgh, studied medicine and became a surgeon in the British Navy. There has been a tradition in the family that he left the Navy because of having engaged in a duel with a British officer. When he came to America he visited the house of one William Hoge, then in Delaware, who had some time previously emigrated to America.

Dr. Robert White there met and married the eldest daughter of William Hoge, named Margaret Hoge (probably this was the real cause of his resigning the Navy).

Now about the year 1735, William Hoge and his son-in-law, Dr. Robert White, (our ancestor), with his children moved to Virginia and settled at or near Winchester, Virginia. (The county of Frederick was not then formed and was not until 1738.)

Dr. Robert White died in 1752 in the sixty-fourth year of his age.

He left surviving him three sons, John, Robert and Alexander. Now just here is where we part company; we have no record of the names of the daughters of Dr. Robert White; if Hannah White was one of them, as you seem to think, she was a sister of the three sons above named. Now to return to the above named John, Robert and Alexander.

John was my ancestor (of Wm. Atkinson). (See present Virginia line.)

Robert lived and died here and I have never heard whether he was married or not or anything about him.

Alexander was the most distinguished of the three sons; he was sent to Scotland and educated at Edinburg. He was not in the Revolutionary war, but during that period was an active and prominent lawyer here, was elected to the first Congress in 1787-93,--a member of the Virginia Convention which adopted the Federal Constitution. He died without children, although he married." (etc.)
From letter from (???). WM. M. ATKINSON, (Of Winchester, Virginia.)
"Dr. Robert White was buried at the old Opequon church, and was a surgeon in the British Navy."
(From letter from Mrs. Juliet A. McCard of Winchester, Va., sister of Wm. M. Atkinson.)

[NI0401] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

The parents of Jean Bodine, who came to Staten Island, New York, from Bethune, Artois, in what is now France, have not been determined. Marie Crocheron was a daughter of Jean and Marie Crocheron of Staten Island, who came from Flanders, in what now is Belgium. (1)

The origins of Jean Bodine and Marie Crocheron were stated in their betrothal record at the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church in the town of Flatbush, on 26 December 1679: (2)

Jean Boden, young man from near Bethune in Artois and Maria Crosseron, young dame from near Rysszl in Vlaanderen, both residents of Staten Island

They were married on 11 January 1680 at Midwout. (3)

Although the marriage record of Marie Crocheron states that she came from Rysszl in Vlaanderen, her sister Adrienne Crocheron, who married Jacques Poillon, was identified as from "Zale in Walsh-Vlanderin." There is a town named Zele in East Flanders, Belgium. The marriages of her sisters, Jeanette and Marguerite Crocheron identify them, respectively, as being from "Walsch Vlaanderen" and "Vlaanderen." (4)

Rysszl might represent a phonetic attempt to spell Roeselare, a town in West Vlaanderen, Belgium, not far from Lille, France. When Jacques Du Bois died at Kingston, New York, in 1676, his widow married John L. Pietersy who, in 1677, agreed with Matthieu Blanchan to honor a prior contract between his wife's first husband and Blanchan. Pietersy also borrowed some money from Matthieu Blanchan, using as security some land lying at Rysszl (Ryssel) in Lille in Flanders which had belonged to Jacques Du Bois. Jacques was a brother of Louis Du Bois, whose daughter Sarah Du Bois married Joost Jans van Meteren in 1692 and had Jan Joosten van Meteren who married Sara Bodine and moved from Kingston to New Jersey. Jan Joosten van Meteren, who used the anglicized version of his name, John Van Meter, married (2) Margaret Mollenauer, daughter of Hendrick Mollenauer, and granddaughter of Sarah Du Bois and Joost Jans van Meteren. John Van Meter died in Frederick County, Virginia, in 1745. (5)

Bethune, in Artois or Pas de Calais, is southwest of Lille and southeast of Boulogne, France.

Jean Crocheron has been called "a Huguenot of distinguished birth, whose ancestors were leaders in commerce and had patents of nobility won on the field of battle or in service for their Sovereign." (6)

Born about 1660, Marie Crocheron Bodine probably was dead by 1697 when her children's share of her father's estate was conveyed by her brother Jean Crocheron, Jr. to her brother-in-law Jacques Poillon, husband of Adrienne Crocheron: (7)

Know all men by these presents that I Jaque Poillon Esq of the above said County doe acknowledge to have received of John Croseheron of ye said County upon ye account of John Bodine children of full and just sum of 93L. 10s., it being of the estate of John Crocheron deceased as witness my hand and seal this 15 day of 1697.

The transcript did not include the month in which this transaction occurred.

Marie Crocheron Bodine definitely was dead and Jean Bodine had remarried before 10 February 1702/3 when her brother Nicholas Crocheron made his will, which was proved on 24 July 1707, leaving one-half of his estate to "the children of John Bodine by his first wife, my nephews and nieces:" (8)

... I, Nicholas Crocheron of Richmond County, being in good health, I give to the poor of the French Congregation on Staten Island, five pounds, to be paid to the Elders. I leave to the children of John Bodine by his first wife, my nephews and nieces, as objects worthy of my charity, one half of all my paternal estate, goods and chattels, in case I leave no children. I leave all of the rest of my estate to my loving wife, Anne Crocheron, and to her heirs and assigns. I leave to all my other heirs, each six shillings.

The inventory of the estate of Jean Bodine (John Bodein) of Richmond County, New York, was approved by his brother-in-law Abraham Lakerman, who was married to Catherine Crocheron. (9)

Isaac Bodine resided in Bridgewater Township, Somerset County, New Jersey. Catherine Bogart Bodine married (2) Roelef Roelefson. Peter and Abraham Bodine lived in New Jersey. Vincent Bodine, who was a mariner and captain of the sloop Mary, resided in New York City. (10)

Catelyn Bodine (Kathleyn Bodyn), wife of Isaac, and Joost Jans van Meteren were sponsors at the baptism of Sarah, first child of John Van Meter and Sara Bodine on 30 October 1706 at the Reformed Dutch Church at Raritan (now Somerville), New Jersey. (11)

Isaac Bodine and Arience Mollenauer (Mullinar), son of Hendrick, were named as executors of the will of Hendrick Mollenauer (Hendrix Mullinar), which was probated on 04 March 1718/19, but they both renounced the appointment and the court named Isaac Van Meter in their stead. (12)
NOTES
1 . The Crocheron Family of Staten Island, Charlotte Megill Hix, New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Volume 111, 1980, photocopy from Philip C. Ellsworth, Bethany, OK, 1986.
2 . ibid.
3 . ibid.
4 . ibid.
5 . American Descendants of Chretien Du Bois of Wicres, France, William Heidgerd, Huguenot Historical Society, New Paltz, New York, 1968, partial photocopy from Philip C. Ellsworth, supra note 1; A Genealogy of the Duke Shepherd Van Metre Family, Samuel Gordon Smyth, The New Era Printing Company, Lancaster, PA, 1909.
6 . Supra note 1.
7 . ibid, citing Richmond County, New York, Land Records Liber B, 313.
8 . ibid, citing WNYHS 1:445.
9 . ibid, citing WNYHS 1:254.
10 . ibid.
11 . A Genealogy of the Duke Shepherd Van Metre Family, supra note 5..
12 . ibid.
Prepared by William G. Scroggins 13 Nov 1989; 718 Mill Valley Drive; Taylor Mill, KY 41015-2278

[NI0402] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Marie came from Flanders. Origins of Jean Bodine and Marie came from their betrothal record at the Reformed Protestant Dutch Church in the town of Flatbush on 26 Dec 1679. She came from Rysszl in Vlaanderen, but her sister was identified as from Zale in Walsh-Vlarderin. There is a town named Zele in East Flanders, Belgium.

[NI0403] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

The parents and birthplace of Jean Crocheron of Staten Island, New York, have not been determined. The maiden name and birthplace of his wife Marie (Mary) also are unknown.

Jean Crocheron has been called "a Huguenot of distinguished birth, whose ancestors were leaders in commerce and had patents of nobility won on the field of battle or in service for their Sovereign." Before coming to America, he lived at Zele, near Dendermonde in East Flanders, Belgium, which is indicated by the marriage record of his daughter Adrienne, who was identified as a young woman from Zale in Walsh-Vlanderin. However he may have had another residence in Flanders. The marriage of his daughter Marie describes her as from Rysszl in Vlaanderen. The marriages of Jeanette and Marguerite identify them, respectively, as being from Walsch Vlaanderen and Vlaanderen. These descriptions probably reflect places of birth. It also has been claimed that Jean Crocheron came from Nantes, France, but, perhaps that is based on earlier origins of the family. The surname Crocheron appears in France as early as 1296 when Agnes de Crocheron married Gilles de Cocq, who was Bailly de Wallincourt and Captain de Malincourt. (1)

Zele and Dendermonde are east of Gent in Oost Vlaanderen. Modern Vlaanderen (Flanders) in Belgium is divided into two jurisdictions, West and Oost Vlaanderen. This area was the Spanish Netherlands during the time of Jean Crocheron. There was a Ryssel near Lille in Artois, now in French Flanders. Jacques Du Bois, uncle of Sarah Du Bois who married Joost Jans van Meteren, had land at Ryssel in Lille when he died in Kingston, New York, in 1676. Perhaps Jean Crocheron moved from Ryssel to Zele to escape the violent persecution of the Catholics in France.

Walsh and Walsch probably were variations of Walslant, which was the Walloon area of southern Belgium and northern France. Francoise Du Bois, aunt of Sarah Du Bois who married Joost Jans van Meteren, and her husband Pierre Billiou were described as of Walslant when they came to America on the St. Jean Baptiste on 09 May 1661. (2)

It has been said that Jean Crocheron arrived in New York City before 1677, among the group of French Vaudois or Waldenses, "adherents of a religious sect in southeastern France which had opposed the Church of Rome as early as the 12th century. During the 16th century they associated themselves with the Huguenots and subsequently suffered many persecutions at the hands of the dukes of Savoy. Many survivors found asylum in Switzerland." Jean has been described as an outspoken leader of the Huguenots who was "marked for execution ... forced to leave his native land when the persecution of the Huguenots reached its height ... converted ... property ... into money ... and then was smuggled out of Marseilles in a hogshead aboard a vessel bound for the New World." (3) This tradition does not account for the emigration of his wife and children who, presumably, could not have fit in the same barrel with him.

The Waldenses were followers of Peter Waldo, a merchant of Lyons, France, about 1160, who objected to certain doctrines of the Roman Catholic Church, such as Mass and the praying to saints. They advocated the charity and the poverty of the Apostles and maintained that the only guide to religious life was the Bible. They did not intend to start a new religion and exerted little influence on reformers, but their beliefs spread from France to many countries in Europe and still may be found as a Protestant sect in Italy and other parts of the continent.

The Huguenots were French Protestants of the 16th and 17th centuries, whose name may have come from one of their leaders, Hugues, or from the German word Eidgenoss, meaning a "confederate by oath." During the French Reformation, which began in the reign of King Francis I of France, who ruled from 1515 to 1547, the Huguenots developed into a political, as well as a religious, entity. Francis I, of the House of Valois, was succeeded by his son Henry II, who was king from 1547 until 1559. In 1559, Henry's eldest son was crowned as King Francis II. He died in 1560 and was followed to the throne by his brother Charles IX. King Charles died in 1574 and a third brother Henry III ruled France until 1589.

King Antoine of Navarre and his brother Louis I de Bourbon, Prince of Conde, joined the Huguenots after Francis II became King of France in 1559. Conde and Admiral Gaspard de Coligny, who converted to Protestantism after the death of King Henry II in 1559, led the Huguenots in several wars against Catholic forces commanded by Henri de Lorraine, Duke of Guise. Conde participated in the unsuccessful conspiracy of Amboise against Guise and escaped execution only because of the death of King Francis II in 1560. As a result of subsequent concessions made to the Huguenots by the regent Catherine de Medici, Conde became governor of Picardy but, after the massacre of Huguenots at Vassy in 1562, he and Coligny again took up arms against the Guise faction. The Huguenots were defeated at Dreux in the same year and Conde was imprisoned. In the second Huguenot War in 1567-9 Conde minted coins which proclaimed him as "Louis XIII, first Christian king of France," but he was captured again at the Huguenot defeat at Jarnac and, this time, shot. Coligny was killed in a general massacre of the Huguenots in 1572. Guise, who was popular with the residents of Paris, formed the Holy League which was designed to support his accession to the throne of France against the claims of Henry de Bourbon, son of King Antoine of Navarre, who had married Marguerite de Valois in 1572. Guise was assassinated in 1588 and, in 1589, Henry de Bourbon succeeded King Henry III, the last French king of the House of Valois, and started the Bourbon dynasty. To obtain the support of the Parisians, King Henry IV had to return to the Catholic faith in 1593.

Subsequently Henry IV gave limited religious freedom to the French Protestants through the Edict of Nantes in 1598. In addition to official recognition of the liberty of conscience, the Edict gave the Huguenots full civil rights, permission to meet for worship in certain places and provision of 100 places for safety. These privileges were under continuous attack by the Catholic majority and churches erected in places not specified in the Edict were destroyed. In 1685, King Louis XIV revoked the law and French Protestants lost all civil rights and religious liberty. Subsequently, nearly 400,000 Huguenots fled to England, Holland and other countries which had toleration for Protestants, with some emigrating to America. (4)

Whatever the circumstances of his background and travel to America, Jean Crocheron acquired land at Long Neck (now New Springville) on Staten Island where, in 1670, he built a home about a mile from where Asbury Church was later erected. A 1676 survey recorded that Jean Crocheron (John Crushuron) had 188 acres, "Two lots at the North Side of the Fresh Kill on Staten Island, lying between the two runs of Karle's Neck and Long Neck. 100 rods in bredth by ye meados Ranging N.E. by ye common 256 rods, Bounded N.W.: Land of Jacob Pullion and S.E.: Ye commons, with 20 acres of meadow next to ye Run of Karle's Neck and 8 acres of fresh meadow." The surveyor reported by a memorandum in 1685 that he could not find the Staten Island land grants. (5)

Jacob "Pullion" probably was connected with Jacques Poillon who married Adrianne Crocheron. Jacques and Jacob are forms of James.

New Springville is a community in west-central Staten Island, Richmond County, New York, at the intersection of Travis and Richmond avenues, between Fresh Kills and Willow Brook parks.

Jean Crocheron was identified as a resident of Raritan, Middlesex County, New Jersey, on 30 March 1688 when he purchased 112 acres of land on the Raritan River in Piscataway Township from Henry Coursen (Coursey). It is not known whether this pertains to Jean, Sr. or Jr. Peter van Ness also had land in this area: (6)

1687 Dec. 30. Deed. Benjamin Fitzrandolph of Piscataway to Henery Coursey of Raraton, Middlesex Co., for 112 acres in Piscataway Township, E. William Claus, S. Raraton R., W. Mr. Clark, N. land not laid out.

1688 March 30. Do. Henery Coursey to Jeane Crocheron, both of Raraton, for the preceding 112 acres.

1687 Oct. 10. Do. Hendrick Coursen and wife Jesyntje to Peter Vaness, all of Raraton, for a lot at Rahawackhacka on both sides of Raraton R., E. John White, W. grantee; the lot being one half of the fourth bought by both from grantor's father Capt. Cornelis Coursen, June 6, 1687.

1687 June 6. Deed. Captain Cornelis Coursen and wife Mary of Staten Island to Hendrick Coursen and Peter van Ness, both of Raraton River, for one fourth of a tract, patented to him February 28, 1683, 1904 acres, S. a bank of upland, W. and N. land not taken up, E. Capt. John Palmer and associates, to be called 1800 acres.

Jean Crocheron died after 13 December 1695, when he made his will, and before 03 September 1696, when Anthony Crocheron was sworn as executor: (7)

... planter, being of great age, but of good and sound memory ... to his beloved wife Mary, the use of all of the estate, both real and personal for life and then to his eldest son, Nicholas Crocheron, the dwelling house on the north side of the island together with two lotts of land belonging thereunto with the privilege of Commonage, and all the fresh and salt meadows belonging to the same being esteemed at twenty acres ... which said lotts of land are bounded south by the highway that parts them from the land now in the tenure and occupacon of one Arent Praell as also two horses and four cows to be chosen by him the said Nicholas out of the stock after the decease of my said wife with a weavers loom tools and appurtenances thereunto belonging ... to his son Anthony my two other lotts of ground ... bound by Long Neck at the side of Mr. John Casiers ... esteemed at twenty acres, with two horses and four cows to be chosen as before, with all the utensils of husbandry. After the death of his wife, and full payment of debts, legacies and bequests, the remainder of the estate to be equally divided among all the children share and share alike ... Nicholas and Anthony to have their equal share thereof over and above the bequests and legacyes aforesaid ... wife and sons Nicholas and Anthony were named executors ... signed ... with a mark ...
On 03 September 1896 (sic), Anthony Crocheron took the oath of an executor.

The witnesses were William Tiller, Thomas Morgan, Jean Cassier and John Dufrow. The will was proved before Governor Fletcher by the oaths of the above witnesses.

Jean may have signed his will with a mark but he must have been literate because his estate inventory contained, among other things, fifteen books. The estate was inventoried by Nathaniel Brittain, Sr. and Nathaniel Brittain, Jr. on 09 January 1696/7 before Elias Duxbury and Thomas Stillwell: (8)

Live stock £131
200 sheffles of wheat 20
110 sheffles of rye 13 15s
Negro man, negro woman and negro boy 120
Money in the house, Arabian gold and other gold 72 8s
English money 45
468 heavy pieces of eight 140 14s 11d
Fifteen books, one a large Bible 4
Total amount £625

On 07 December 1696 Thomas Morgan and William Fillyer made another inventory of the estate of Jean (John) Crocheron of Staten Island that was sworn to on 08 March 1696/7: (9)

Money in his chest £286 8p
A negro man, an Indian woman and her child 108
Eight cows left as a legacy to Nicholas and
Anthony Crocheron 22
Six heifers, 2 steers and a bull 9
Total £531

Since the totals of these itemizations do not add up correctly, the published abstracts must be incomplete.

Jean Crocheron's neighbor, Arent Praell, may have been the Arendt Prall (Prael) who was married to Marie Billiou, daughter of Pierre Billiou and Francoise Du Bois.
If Antoine Crocheron had a wife and children, they apparently died before him, since his brother Nicholas was his heir. Antoine died after his father made his will on 13 December 1695 and before 08 February 1697 when a declaration was made, stating that Nicholas Crocheron had inherited two lots of land from his brother Antoine (Anthony) Crocheron, deceased, which had been bequeathed to Antoine by their father Jean (John) Crocheron. Nicholas granted these two lots to his brother Jean (John) and the action was recorded on 14 December 1697. On 25 March 1702/3 another statement, also dated 08 February 1697, was recorded in which Nicholas Crocheron conveyed his two lots of land, household goods, house, barns, orchards, negroes, horses, cows and cattle to his brother Jean Crocheron (John Corshone). It was stipulated that Jean was to pay thirteen pounds yearly rent to Nicholas, who was to be allowed to remain in the house and be provided with meat, drink, washing, lodging and a horse to ride. The deed was signed by mark and
witnessed by Ellis Duxbury, Andre Canan and John Casier. (10)

This deed suggests that Nicholas Crocheron was unwell in 1697 and did not expect to be able to support himself. However, in his will, dated 10 February 1702/3, he declared that he was in good health. Since he had no living children when he made his will, at about age 54, Nicholas and his wife and heir Anne, who survived him, may have been childless. Anne may have been a second wife, with children, since the will mentions her heirs as residuary legatees. The will was witnessed by John Bellville, Moyse Bernad and William Tilyer. It was proved before Thomas Wenham, Esq., on 24 July 1707: (11)

... I, Nicholas Crocheron of Richmond County, being in good health, I give to the poor of the French Congregation on Staten Island, five pounds, to be paid to the Elders. I leave to the children of John Bodine by his first wife, my nephews and nieces, as objects worthy of my charity, one half of all my paternal estate, goods and chattels, in case I leave no children. I leave all of the rest of my estate to my loving wife, Anne Crocheron, and to her heirs and assigns. I leave to all my other heirs, each six shillings.

Previously Nicholas and his brother Jean, Jr. seem to have acquired their father's and on Staten Island by a series of deeds dated 25 May 1702. Conveyances, "out f the estate of John Crocheron, deceased," were made to Nicholas Crocheron and Jean Crocheron from Gerrit van Vechten (Garrett Veighte) and from Peter van Ness (Van Neste). Nicholas Crocheron and his wife Anna transferred land on Carl's Neck to Jean (John) Crocheron. (Deeds B:490.) Nicholas Crocheron bought land on Carl's Neck on Staten Island from Lambert Garrison on 19 December 1706. (12)
NOTES:
1 . The Crocheron Family of Staten Island, Charlotte Megill Hix, New York Genealogical and Biographical Record, Volume 111, 1980, photocopy from Philip C. Ellsworth, Bethany, OK, 1986.
2 . Ships Passenger Lists New York and New Jersey 1600-1825, Carl Boyer III, Newhall, CA, 1978, page 127, excerpt from Lists of Passengers, 1654 to 1664, Year Book of the Holland Society of New York, 1902.
3 . Supra note 1.
4 . The Lincoln Library of Essential Information, The Frontier Press, Buffalo, 1967.
5 . Supra note 1.
6 . Patents and Deeds and Other Early Records of New Jersey 1664-1703, William Nelson, Paterson, NJ, 1899, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1976, abstract, East Jersey Deeds, Liber D.
7 . Supra note 1, Liber 5, page 126, Wills of New York County.
8 . Supra note 1, WNYHS 1:37.
9 . Supra note 1, WNYHS 1:274.
10 . Supra note 1, Richmond County, New York, Land Records Liber B, pages 311-312 and 422.
11 . Supra note 1, WNYHS 1:445.
12 . Supra note 1, Richmond County Deeds B:544.
Prepared by William G. Scroggins 13 November 1989, 718 Mill Valley Drive, Taylor Mill, KY 41015-2278

[NI0406] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Joost Jans van Meteren, who married Sarah Du Bois, was a son of Jan Joosten van Meteren and Macyken Hendricksen of the Province of Gelderland in The Netherlands, who arrived in America on 12 September 1662 with their five children on the ship Fox and settled at Wiltwyck, which became Kingston, in Ulster County, New York.

As a widow in 1714, Sarah Du Bois, her sons, Isaac and John Van Meter, and her brother Jacob Du Bois of Hurley bought 3000 acres of land in West Jersey. Two years later, Sarah and her sons sold their shares to Jacob Du Bois. Jan Joosten van Meteren (John Van Meter), son of Joost Jans Van Meteren and Sarah Du Bois, engaged in extensive trading with the Indians and became very familiar with the western frontier areas where he began looking for new land upon which to settle in western Maryland and the Shenandoah region. On 06 June 1730 John Van Meter was assigned 10,000 acres and the pre-emption rights to another 20,000 acres of land on the Shenandoah River for "himself & eleven children, & also that of divers of his Rela'cons & friends living in the Government of New York."

John Van Meter, "descendant of a Holland Dutchman from New York," Jacob Stover (Stauber), from Switzerland, and Hans Jost Heydt (Hite), from Alsatia, were instrumental in promoting the settlement of the Shenandoah Valley by Germans. Stover and Hite, with their wives and one child each, sailed to England from Rotterdam on 15 July 1709 and to New York in 1710. Hite was married to Anna Maria Du Bois, daughter of a Louis Du Bois, a French Huguenot and a relative of Sarah DuBois van Meteren whose family migrated earlier from Mannheim and settled at New Paltz in Ulster County, New York. Hite lived with the Du Bois family at New Paltz and he became acquainted with the van Meteren family of Kingston. Hite moved to Kingston by November 1711 and engaged in fur trading. He went to Germantown, Pennsylvania, about 1716 and bought a large tract of land on Perkiomen Creek in Montgomery County (then Philadelphia County) where he operated mills and weaving shops in addition to farming. In May 1728 "Yost Hyt" was among "ye Back Inhabitors about Falkner Swamp and New Coshahopin" who appealed to Governor Patrick Gordon of Pennsylvania for protection against Indian encroachments. When the government failed to support the settlers, many began looking for new homes. With the assistance of John Van Meter, Hite soon moved to Virginia.

Jacob Du Bois of Hurley, his sister Sarah Du Bois, widow of Joost Jans van Meteren, and her sons, Isaac and Jan Joosten van Meteren (John Van Meter), bought 3000 acres in West Jersey in 1714. Two years later Sarah and her sons sold their shares to Jacob. Barent and Louis Du Bois lived on this land and Louis died there in 1784.

History of New Paltz, New York, and Its Old Families, Ralph Le Fevre, Albany, 1909, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1973; Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, New York, 1660-1809, Roswell Randall Hoes, De Vinne Press, New York, 1891, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1980; Who Was Who in Hardin County, Hardin County Historical Society, Elizabethtown, 1941, photocopy; The Virginia Germans, Klaus Wust, The University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1969; Immigrant Ancestors, Frederick Adams Virkus, extracted from The Compendium of American Genealogy, Volume VII, Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1980; Ships Passenger Lists New York and New Jersey 1600-1825, Carl Boyer III, Newhall, CA, 1978; data of Alice Lewis Gunter, Independence, MO, Betty Meredith Peger, Brownsville, KY, and Barry W. Downs, Leitchfield, KY, 1984.

Prepared by WILLIAM G SCROGGINS 13 Nov 1989
718 Mill Valley Drive, Taylor Mill KY 41015-2278

[NI0407] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Louis Du Bois, a leader of the French Huguenot settlers at New Paltz, New York, was a son of Chretien Du Bois, a Huguenot of Wicres, near Lille, in Artois Province which now is French Flanders. Catherine Blanchan was a daughter of Matthieu Blanchan and Madeleine Joris, who came to America on the Gilded Otter, which arrived in New Netherland in June 1660 from England. Louis and Catherine were married in Mannheim, Germany, on 10 October 1655 and, apparently, came to New Netherland on the ship St. Jan Baptist (St. Jean Baptiste) from England, which landed on 06 August 1661. Their sons Abraham and Isaac were aged 4 and 2, respectively, when they arrived. Louis settled his family at Hurley in Ulster County, New York, and they were there in 1670 when son Solomon was born.
Louis Du Bois was called Louis the Walloon because he came from the part of Flanders lying between the Scheldt and Lys whose residents were known as Walloons. The Walloons are a French-speaking people of Celtic descent inhabiting southern and southeastern Belgium and adjacent regions of France. The term Walloon comes from the Medieval Latin word Wallo for foreigner or Welshman.
Lille was in the County of Flanders in the Spanish Netherlands when Louis was born. This area was later conquered by France.
Louis Du Bois moved from Wicres to Mannheim on the Rhine River, which was the capitol of the Palatinate, or Paltz, a small principality of the Holy Roman Empire in 1648, which was later incorporated into Baden. At this time Mannheim was a refuge for the Huguenots seeking to escape persecution in nearby France. Despite the religious freedom granted by the Edict of Nantes in 1598, these French Protestants were in constant conflict with the Catholic majority. In Mannheim, Louis Du Bois met and married Catherine Blanchan, daughter of Matthieu Blanchan, who moved there from Neuville in Artois where he had been born. Louis and Catherine had at least two sons, Abraham and Isaac, born to them in Mannheim before they emigrated to America.
Louis and Catherine Blanchan Du Bois were residing in Hurley, New York, by 1661 when their son Jacob was presented at the Dutch Protestant Church in Kingston for baptism.
Louis Du Bois was a member of the first Court of Sessions and led an expedition against the Indians in 1663.
The Huguenot residents of Kingston and Hurley decided to form a settlement of their own and on 26 May 1677 Louis Du Bois and eleven associates (his sons Abraham Du Bois and Isaac Du Bois, his brother-in-law Antoine Crespel, Christian Deyo and his son Pierre Deyo, the brothers Abraham and Jean Hasbrouck, the brothers Andre and Simon LeFever, Hugo Freer and Louis Bevier) purchased a tract of land from the Esopus Indians, "comprising the Paltz patent, occupying all the present town of Lloyd, about two-thirds of New Paltz, one-third of Esopus and one-fourth of Rosendale." The purchase was confirmed in a patent from Governor Edmund Andros on 29 September 1677 with the four corners of the grant being "Moggonck - now Mohonk, Juffrou's Hook, the point in the Hudson where the town line between Lloyd and Marlborough strikes the river, Rapoos - Pell's Island, and Tower a Toque, a point of white rocks in the Shawangunks near Rosendale Plains." The ancient documents, long stored in a trunk in the Huguenot Bank at New Paltz, were translated from the Dutch by the Reverend Ame Vennema:
By approbation of his Excellency Governor Edmond Andras, dated April 28, 1677, an agreement is made on this date, the 26th of May, of the year 1677, for the purchase of certain lands, between the parties herein named and the undersigned Esopus Indians.
Matsayay, Nekahakaway, Magakahas, Assinnerakan, Wawawanis acknowledge to have sold to Lowies du Booys and his partners the land described as follows: Beginning from the high hills at a place named Moggonck, from thence south-east toward the river to a point named Juffrous Hoock, lying in the Long Reach, named by the Indians Magaatramis, then north up along the river to the island called by the Indians Raphoes, then west toward the high hills to a place called Waratahaes and Tawaentaqui, along the high hills south-west to Moggonck, being described by the four corners with everything included within these boundaries, hills, dales, waters, etc., and a right of way to the Ronduyt kill as directly as it can be found, and also that the Indians shall have the same right to hunt and to fish as the Christians, for which land the Indians have agreed to accept the articles here specified: 40 kettles, 10 large, 30 small; 40 axes; 40 adzes; 40 shirts; 400 fathoms of white net-work; 300 fathoms of black net-work; 60 pairs of stockings, half small sizes; 100 bars of lead; 1 keg of powder; 100 knives; 4 kegs of wine; 40 oars; 40 pieces of "duffel" (heavy woolen cloth); 60 blankets; 100 needles; 100 awls; 1 measure of tobacco; 2 horses - 1 stallion, 1 mare:
Parties on both sides acknowledge to be fully satisfied herewith and have affixed their own signatures ad ut supra, Matsaya X his mark; Waehtonck X his mark; Seneraken X his mark; Magakahoos X his mark; Wawateanis X his mark; Lowies Du Booys; Christian de Yoo X his mark; Abraham Haesbroecq; Andrie Lefeber; Jan Broecq; Piere Doyo; Anthony Crespel; Abraham Du Booys; Hugo Freer; Isaack D. Boojs; Symon Lefeber. Witnesses: Jan Eltinge; Jacomeyntje Sleght; Jan Mattyse. Agrees with the original. W. La: Montague, Secry.
I do allow of the within Bargaine and shall Grant patents for y (sic) Same when payments made accordingly before mee or Magistrates of Esopus. Andross.
We the undersigned persons, former owners of the land sold to Lowies Du Booys and his partners acknowledge to have been fully satisfied by them according to agreement we therefore transfer the designated land with a free right of way for them and their heirs, and relinquishing ferever (sic) our right and title, will protect them against further claims, in token whereof we have affixed our signatures in the presence of the Justice, Sheriff, Magistrates and Bystanders, on the 15 September 1677, at Hurley, Esopus Sackmakers,
Witnesses: Sewakuny X his mark; Hamerwack X his mark; Manvest X her mark; Mahente; Papoehkies X his mark; Pochquqet X his mark; Haroman X his mark; Pagotamin X his mark; Haromini X his mark; Wingatiek X his mark; Wissinahkan X his mark; Mattawessick X his mark; Matsayay X his mark; Asserwvaka X his mark; Umtronok X his mark; Wawanies X sister in his absence called Waramenhtow; Magakhoos X her mark; Wawejask X his mark; Nawah X his mark; Tomaehkapray X his mark; Sagarowanto X his mark; Sawanawams X his mark; Machkamoeke X his mark.
Witnesses: Jan Eltinge; Roelof Henderyckx; John Ward; Gars X Harris; Albert Jansen.
Testis: Thomas Chambers; Hall Sherrife; Wessel Ten Broeck; Dirck Schepmoes; Hendrik Jochensen; Joost de Yadus; Garit X Cornelise; Lambert X Huybertse.
Mattay has publicly proclaimed and acknowledged in the presence of all the Indian bystanders that the land had been fully paid for in which all concurred. Testis: W: Montague, Secr.
Governor Edmund Andros confirmed the Huguenot land acquisition from the Indians with an English patent: Edmund Andros, Esqr. Seigneur of Sansmarez, Lieut. t (sic) Governor Generall under his Royall Highness: James Duke of Yorke & Albany &c. of all his Territoryes in America. Whereas there is a certain piece of Land att Esopus, the which by my approbacon and Consent, hath been purchased of the Indian Proprietors, by Lewis DuBois and Partners; The said Land lyeing on the South side of the Redoute Creek or Kill, beginning from the High Hills called Moggonck, from thence stretching South East neare the Great River, to a certain Point or Hooke, called the Jeuffrous Hoocke, lyeing in the long Reach named by the Indyans Magaatramis, then North up alengst (sic) the River to an Island in a Crooked Elbow in the Beginning of the Long Reach called by the Indyans Raphoos, then West, on to the High Hills, to a place called Waratahaes and Tawaratague, and so alongst the said High Hills South West to Moggonck aforesaid; All which hath by the Magistrates of Esopus been certifyed unto mee, to have publiquely bought and paid for in their presence; As by the returne from theme doth and may appeare: Know yee that by vertue of his Ma,ties Letters Patents, and the Commission and authority unto mee given by his Royall Highness, I have given, Ratifyed, confirmed and granted, and by these presents doe hereby give, ratify, confirme & grant unto the said Lewis DuBois and Partners, Thatt is to say, Christian Doyo, Abraham Haesbroecq, Andries Lefevre, Jean Broecq, Pierre Doyo, Laurens Biverie, Anthony Crespell, Abraham DuBois, Hugo Frere, Isaack DuBois, and Symeon LeFevre, their heyres and Assignes, the afore recited piece of Land and premises; Together with all the Lands, Soyles, Woods, Hills, Dales, meadowes, pastures, Marshes, Lakes, waters, Rivers, fishing, Hawking, Hunting and fowling and all other Profitts, Commoditys, and Emoluments whatsoever to the said piece of land and premises belonging, with their & every of their appurtenances, & of every part and parcell thereof; To have and to hold said piece of Land and Premises, with all and Singular the appurtenances unto the said Lewis DuBois and partners their heyres and Assignes, to the proper use and behoofe of him the said Lewis DuBois and partners their heyres and Assignes for ever. And that the plantacons which shall bee settled upon the said piece of land bee a Township, and that the Inhabitants to have liberty to make a High Way between them and the Redout Creeke or Kill for their Convenience. Hee, the said Lewis DuBois and partners their heyres and Assigns, Returning due Surveys & makeing improvem't thereon according to Law; And Yielding and paying therefore yearely and every yeare unto his Royall Highnesse use as an acknowledgement or Quitt Rent att the Redout in Esopus five bushells of good Winter Wheat unto such Officer or Officers as shall be empowered to receive the same: Given under my hand and Sealed with y (sic) Seale of the Province in New Yorke this 29th day of September in the 29th yeare of his Ma'ties Reigne, Anno Domini 1677. Andross Examined by mee Matthias: Nicolls, Secr.
Two months later, Governor Andros issued a final order pertaining to the Huguenot patent:
Upon request of Louis DuBois and partners at Esopus, that they may have Liberty to goe and settle upon the land by them purchased on the South side of the Redout Creek, at their first convenience, these are to certify that they have Liberty so to do, Provided they build a Redoute there first for a place of Retreat and Safeguard upon Occasion: Action in New York, November, 1677. E. Andros.
Louis Du Bois has been credited with selecting the site of the New Paltz settlement on the lowlands along the Wallkill, which he first saw when he was on the expedition to rescue his wife and the others from the Indians in 1663. Louis obtained an individual grant on 02 June 1688 from Governor Dongan for land lying on both sides, but mostly on the west side, of the Wallkill, in the locality called Poughwoughtenonk by the Indians, which adjoined the Paltz patent on the south and extended to a 5000-acre tract at Guilford granted to James Graham and John Delavall in 1685. Across the Wallkill at the mouth of the Plattekill was the last Indian village in the area.
In 1676 Louis Du Bois, Antoine Crespel, Matthieu Blanchan and about sixty other residents of Hurley and Wiltwyck, of whom only Louis moved to New Paltz, petitioned Governor Andros for a minister to be assigned to Esopus who could preach in both Dutch and English, recommending the Reverend Peter Teschenmaker for the post.
Louis Du Bois and his partners in the New Paltz patent were residents of Hurley when they got the patent and moved to their new settlement about 1677. In 1683 they formally organized a French church there, which was not known as the Huguenot church but as the Walloon church. The first record book was maintained by Louis Du Bois in his handwriting in French. The first entry dated 22 January 1683 recorded that the first services were conducted by the Reverend Pierre Dailie and that at his suggestion the congregation elected an elder and a deacon. Louis Du Bois was chosen to be the elder:
Le 22 de Janv. (Janvier), 1683, monsieur pierre daillie, minister de la parole de dieu, est arive (arrive) au nouveau palatinat,. et presca (precha) duex fois le dimance (Dimanche) suivant, et proposa au ceef (chefs) des famille de coisir (Choisir) a plus de vois (voix), par les peres de famille, un ancien et un diake (diacre), ce qu il firt (qu'ils firent), et coisir (choisirent) Louys du bois pour ancien et hughe frere pour diake ...
January 22, 1683. Mr. Pierre Daillie, minister of the Word of God, arrived at New Paltz, and preached twice the Sunday following, and proposed to the heads of the families to choose by a majority of the votes of the fathers of the families an Elder and a Deacon, which they did, and chose Louis Du Bois for Elder and Hugh Frere for Deacon ...
The French records of the New Paltz church contain the baptisms of three children to whom Louis Du Bois and Catherine Blanchan were godparents:
April 28, 1684. Baptized a child of Isaac DuBois and Marie Hasbrouck, named Daniel. Godfather, Louis DuBois, and Catharine Blancon, Godmother.
September 23, 1684. Baptized a child of Abraham Ruton (Rutemps) and Marie Petilon, named Daniel. Godfather, Louys DuBois, Catherine Blancon (Blanjean), Godmother.
April 17, 1685. Baptized a child of Abraham DuBois and Margaret Doioie, named Abraham. Louis DuBois, Godfather, and Catherine Blancon, Godmother.
The last entry in the register by Louis Du Bois was dated March 1686. That year he moved from New Paltz to Kingston where he bought a house on the northwest corner of John Street and Clinton Avenue where he lived for ten years until his death in 1696.
Among the papers in the patentees' trunk, which was opened for examination of its contents at the Huguenot Bank in New Paltz in 1850, were three receipts in the handwriting and containing the signature of Louis Du Bois who was a money lender as well as an extensive land owner.
On 13 October 1670 Louis Du Bois and his wife Catherine Blanchan made a joint will providing that their minor children be educated until they could earn a living. After the death of one testator, if the surviving testator should remarry, then one-half of the estate would go to the children and upon the death of the other testator one-fourth of the remaining half would go to the children.
Before he moved from New Paltz to Kingston in 1686, Louis Du Bois made another will: In the name of God, Amen, the one and thirtieth day of March, Anno Domini, 1686, I, Louis Du bois, of the New Paltz in the County of Ulster, being both sound in body and of good and perfect memory, thanks be to the Almighty, and calling to remembrance the uncertain Estate of this transitory life, and that all flesh must yield unto death whom it shall please God to call; doe make, constitute, ordain and declare this my last will and testament, in manner following: Revoking and annuling, by these presents, all and every testament and testaments, will and wills, hertofore by me made and declared either by word or writing, and this to be my last will and testament. Imprimis: I will that all my just debts shall be paid within a convenient time after my decease, and what there shall be found afterwards belonging to my Estate, shall be equally dealt among my children but my two oldest sons desiring to have each of them a part of the land of the New Paltz, more that the other sons by reason their names are upon the Patent, but they will be content to deale equally with my other children, whether in land, houses, or any other sort of goods whatsoever belonging to my said Estate, as well as the lands of the Paltz that I have bought for me and after my death and their mother's decease, shall be dealt equally amongst them, (to wit,) Three parts lying and being situated in the New Paltz, but if they (to wit) my two eldest sons will each of them have a part of the land lying in the New Paltz, they may have it after myn and their mother's death, with condition they shall pay for the said land with all the interest of the same, unto the other of my children, and shall not inherit any of the other land, houses, or any other sort of goods belonging to my said Estate, but them that have house lots and have built thereon, shall keep the same upon condition that the other of my children shall have so much land instead thereof, in such convenient places as may be found most expedient for them in any place belonging to my said Estate. Myn wife, their mother, shall have the ordering of the Estate, that is to say, to have the profits and perquisites of the same, so long as she remaineth the widow, but in case she cometh to remarry, that she shall have the one right half of the whole Estate, either lands, houses, or any other goods or chattels, whatsoever belong to my said Estate, and the other half shall be amongst the children aforesaid, equally dealt, except my two eldest sons, which, if they will have the Lotts above mentioned, must pay for the same with the interest of the said land, and shall have no other part in my said Estate, that is my last will and testament and no other, in witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal the day and year first above written. Louis Du Bois. Signed and sealed in presence of Arent Tennisson, Dirck Schepmoes. Entered upon record 19th May, 1686. Examined per John Ward, D'p't Cl'k.
Two wills of Louis Du Bois are filed in the office of the clerk of the court of appeals in Albany but his third and last will is recorded in the office of the Surrogate of the County of New York. In his last will Louis Du Bois left his entire estate to his wife with the unusually generous stipulation that if she married again she was to retain one-half of it. As a widow, she was considered a wealthy woman. Perhaps much of her wealth came to her and her husband from her father Matthieu Blanchan who was described as a very rich man. Written in Dutch and dated 26 March 1694 with a codicil added 22 February 1695/6, the last will of Louis Du Bois was proved on 13 July 1697:
Be it hereby known that on this seven and twentieth day of March in the year of our Lord one thousand six hundred and ninety-four Lowis duboys of Kingston, in the County of Ulster, being sound in body going and standing and in possession of his intelligence, reason and memory and having the full use thereof and considering the brevity and frailty of man's life, the certainty of death and the uncertain hour thereof; and being desirous to put all things in order, makes this his last will and testament in manner and form herein described revoking and hereby absolutely annulling every present will and testament and the wills made and declared heretofore, whether spoken or written, notwithstanding any promise or clause to the contrary and that this shall be received as my last will and testament and none other. First I commend my soul to Almighty God my Creator and to Jesus Christ my Redeemer and to the Holy Spirit my sanctifier and my body to the earth whence it came to be buried after the Christian manner and at the last day to enjoy the sole bliss of immortality, which God in grace has promised and prepared only through the merits of Jesus Christ for all those who truly unfeignedly repent and believe in Him. And concerning such temporal estate of land, houses, goods and debts as it has pleased the Lord far beyond my deserts to grant me I ordain and dispose of the same in the form herein described. Imprimis (firstly) it is my will and desire that all my valid debts shall at the proper time be paid. Secondly, I give to my wife Catrina deboys all my Estate of lands, houses, goods, debts, money, gold, silver, coined or not coined, or what further to my Estate belongs, to be used by her during her life and after my aforesaid wife's decease the aforesaid Estate shall then be available for the benefit of my Heirs hereinafter described, with this understanding nevertheless, that in case the aforesaid wife should marry again she would then be obliged to turn over half of the entire Estate to my heirs herein named. Thirdly, I give to my eldest son Abram Duboys Six pounds in money as the right of seniority by birth without pretending beyond this on that ground. Fourthly, I give to my aforesaid son Abram DuBois or Heirs the lawful Eighth part of my entire Estate as being then, when a separation or division of the same should be made according to my order described above. Fifthly, I give to my son Jacob the lawful Eighth part of my entire estate, as afore conditioned. Sixthly, I give to my son David or his heirs the lawful Eighth part of my entire estate, as above. Seventhly, I give to my son Solomon the lawful Eighth part of my entire estate, as before. Eighthly, I give to my son Lowies the lawful eighth part of my entire estate, as before. Ninthly, I give to my son Matthew the lawful Eighth part of my entire estate, as before. Tenthly, I give to the children that are left of the late Isaac duboys the lawful eighth part of my entire estate with this condition that in case the aforesaid children should come to die during their minority then said part shall be equally divided among my other heirs designated without any one else having any pretension on the same. Eleventhly, I give to the children of my daughter Sarah, having married Joost Janse, whether present or future, the lawful eighth part of my whole estate with this stipulation that my aforesaid daughter Sarah shall have and enjoy the usufruct or temporary enjoyment and profit thereof during her lifetime. Twelfthly, I appoint as Executrix of this my last will and testament my aforesaid wife Catrina duboyes ordaining and desiring that all that has been mentioned be deemed valid and held in value and caused to be so held. In attestation of the truth I have signed this at my home and sealed in the presence of witnesses in Kingston on the day and year as aforesaid. Louys Dubois Signed and sealed in presence of John Ward Steven, Walloon, W. DeMeyer.
Codicil Be it hereby known to every one, that I undersigned Lowis duboys of Kingston in the County of Ulster, being sick but in the full possession of my faculties and mind, praised be the Lord, on the 27th day of March, 1694, in the presence of Jan Ward Steven, Walloon, and Wm. de Meyer as witnesses of the same made what shall appear to be my last Will and Testament, I hereby approving and confirming the same and desire that the same shall in all respects be followed up, with this change however as is here according to my desire expressed and described, to wit: Firstly, it is my will and desire, that my son Jacob Duboys shall have in right and in true possession the lawful half of my Farm that lies on the Hurley Piece between the land of Hyman and Jan Rosa and the land of Lammert Huyberse leaving him to dispose of the same according to his pleasure with this stipulation that my aforesaid son Jacob duboys shall be in duty bound to pay for the aforesaid land the quantity of one thousand and five hundred bushels of wheat. So also shall the aforesaid Jacob duboys use the other half of aforesaid land, hired, until my youngest son Matthew duBois shall have attained his majority and for the use of the same to pay sixty bushels of wheat per annum and I hereby declare that on this day I have transferred to my youngest son Matthew DuBois a house and ground in Kingston, a parcel of pastureground and the lawful half of my land that lies on the Hurley Piece according to the tenure of the aforesaid transfer and that my aforesaid son Matthew DuBois shall have to furnish and pay the quantity or amount of fifteen hundred bushels of wheat notwithstanding the aforesaid transfer mentions how that payment thereof shall be made. In the third place, It is my will and desire that the land bought by my son David of Jan Wood shall be paid out of my Estate whereas I have so promised my son David. 4th, It is my will and desire, That my sons Solomon and Loues Deboys shall have for themselves, in true and rightful ownership and to their order or for their heirs my land that lies in the vicinity of the Paltz, to wit the ground obtained of Coll Thomas Dongan the 2nd day of June 1688 and to pay for the same the quantity of eight hundred bushels of wheat. 5, It is also my will and desire that my daughter Sarah, wife of Joost Janse, shall have in true and rightful ownership for herself and to her order or for her heirs a piece of land in the jurisdiction of Hurley adjoining the ground of Cornelis Cool and for the same to pay the quantity of seven hundred bushels of wheat, to understand that the woodland adjoining the aforesaid land is included with the same. Sixth, I declare that all has herein been specified agreeing with several papers written by my own hand and signed in presence of witnesses, desiring that the whole shall be perfectly followed up and carried out, only that in place of a thousand bushels of wheat touching Solomon and Lowies, this now shall be put at but eight hundred bushels, having thus done at Kingston at my house the 22nd of February 1695/6. Louis due Bois. Signed, sealed and declared by Lowies duboys to Be His Last Will and Testament in presence of William de Meyer, Jacob Rutsen, Jan Burhans, Mattij Slecht.
The conveyance from Louis Du Bois to his youngest son Mathew Du Bois was also signed by his wife Catherine:
To all Christian people To whom this Shall or May Come Lowies dubois of Kingston in ye County of ulster and Catharina his wife Sendeth greeting. Whereas the said Lowies duboys and Catharine his Wife for Divers good Causes and Considerations them thereunto moving but more & Especially for and In consideration of a Certaine Summe or quantity of One thousand and five hundred Schuypples of Wheat to them in hand payd before the Ensealing and Delivery of these presents by Matthw duboys Jongest Sunn of them the said Lowies duboys & Catharina his Wife have Bargained, Sold, alienated, enfeofed, assigned and Settover, and by these presents doe Bargain, Sell, alienate Enfoefe assign and Settover unto the Said Matthew Duboys the Right halfe of ye Certaine tract or parcell of Land Situate, Lying & being uppon hooly peece betwixt the Land of Hyman & Jan Roos and the Land of Lammert huylands and now in the possession of Jacob duboys. Likewise a house, barne & lot of ground in ye towne of Kingstowne betwixt the housing & ground of Coll. Henricus Beekman & Saloman Duboys. Likewise a small piece of pasture Land to ye east side of the towne of Kingstowne afous'd betwixt ye ground of sd Henricus Beekman and Wessel Ten Broeck; To have and to hold the said tract or Parcel of Land, house and lot of ground and pasture Land unto the Said Matthew Duboys his heirs and assigns and to the Only proper use benefit and behoofs of him the Said Matthew Duboys his heirs and assigns for ever, and the Said Matthew Duboys to Enter in peaceable possession of ye Said Land When hee shall Come to ye age of one & twenty years, and the house, pasture Land, &c ., O - after the Decease of them the Said Lowies Duboys and Catharina his Wife have hereunto Sett their hands and Affixed their seals. In Kingstowne this 22nd day of February, 1695-6. Lowies du boys, (seal) Catharina duboys. (seal) Signed, Sealed and Delivered in the presence of Jan Burhans, Marttys Slecht, W. D. Myer. In the presence of Me Jacob Rutsen.
The children of Louis Du Bois executed quit claim deeds to each other in 1706 for their shares in their father's estate.
On 01 August 1689 "the resident proprietors of the twelve parts of the village of New Paltz, a dependency of Kingston, county of Ulster, province of New York," which included Louis Du Bois, Abraham Du Bois, Isaac Du Bois, Antoine Crespel, Abraham Hasbrouck, Jean Hasbrouck, Pierre Doyo, Hugo Frere, Louis Bevier and Elizabeth Doyo, gave schoolmaster Jean Cottin a cottage and some land near the place reserved for building a church. The deed restricted Cottin from selling the property to anyone "not of good life and manners." The conveyance, which apparently constituted a contract with Cottin to teach school at the village, also stipulated that the proprietors were "not to keep said Cottin as schoolmaster longer than we think fit and proper." Cottin sold this house and lot to Hugo Freer in 1701, probably at the time he relinquished his teaching post and moved to Kingston, where he married Catherine Blanchan, the widow of Louis Du Bois. Jean Cottin died in 1723, leaving much property to the church. In describing the location of the cottage, which undoubtedly was to serve as the schoolhouse and home of the teacher, at the end of the street on the left side near the large clearing where they planned to erect a church, this document indicates that the Huguenots of New Paltz were well-organized and business-like with an established plan for their community, including covenants to protect the sale of land to undesirable persons.
History of New Paltz, New York, and Its Old Families, Ralph Le Fevre, Albany, 1909, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1973; Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, New York, 1660-1809, Roswell Randall Hoes, De Vinne Press, New York, 1891, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1980; Who Was Who in Hardin County, Hardin County Historical Society, Elizabethtown, 1941, photocopy; The Virginia Germans, Klaus Wust, The University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1969; Immigrant Ancestors, Frederick Adams Virkus, extracted from The Compendium of Americ

[NI0414] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

The parents of Macyken's second husband Jan Joosten van Meteren of the Province of Gelderland in The Netherlands have not been determined, but Dutch naming patterns indicate that his father would have been named Joost van Meteren.

Jan and Macyken, who were Dutch Protestants at Tiederwelt (Thierlewoodt), sailed to America with their five children on the ship Fox (Vos) out of Amsterdam which arrived in New Netherland on 12 September 1662. At the time of their voyage, the children were aged 15, 12, 9, 6, and 2 1/2 years. Jan and Macyken settled at Wiltwyck (Kingston) in Ulster County, New York. Macyken and two of her children, reputedly including Joost Jans, were captured by the Minisink Indians in 1663. They were in the group of women and children taken captive when Indians attacked and burned Hurley and part of Kingston on 10 June 1663.Among the prisoners taken by the marauders were Catherine Blanchan, wife of Louis Du Bois, and three of her children (her daughter Sarah, who married Joost Jans van Meteren, was born the following year), her sister Marie, who was the wife of Antoine Crespel, with her child and two younger siblings of Catherine and Marie. On 05 September 1663 an expedition led by Captain Kregier from New York, including Louis Du Bois and others, surprised the Indians at their fort near the Hogabergh in Shawangunk, and recovered, after almost three months of captivity, the 23 women and children who had been taken from Hurley and Kingston.

On 06 October 1673 Jan Joosten van Meteren was named as one of four magistrates for Hurley and Marbletown to supervise the merger of the village of Niuew Dorp into Hurley and Marbletown under English rule. The other magistrates were Roelof Hendricksen, Louis Du Bois and Jan Broerson. The relationship of Roelof Hendricksen to Macyken Hendricksen who married Jan Joosten van Meteren has not been determined.

Macyken, wife of Jan Joosten van Meteren, was a legatee of Everdt Pary whose will was dated 26 March 1675 in Ulster County. The relationship of Macyken to Everdt Pary also is not known.

On 16 December 1681 Jan Joosten van Meteren and his wife Macyken made a will (testamentary deposition) declaring that whichever was the survivor would have possession of all of their property; lands, houses, personal effects, money, gold and silver, either coined or uncoined. After the death of both, their eldest son Joost would receive one-half of the entire estate and then one-half of the remainder. He was to get one-half of the land at Marbletown and then share the remaining half equally with his brother Gysbert. Geertje inherited property known as Wassamaker's land. The children of deceased daughter Lysbeth were to receive their portion in money from Joost, Gysbert and Geertje. Catherine was not named in the will so she must have received her portion of the estate previously. Jan Joosten van Meteren died before 13 June 1706, when his will and the inventory of his estate are recorded in Burlington County, New Jersey, under the name Jan Joosten and marked as Dutch. His personal property was appraised by Joris van Neste and Hendricks Runersen. The appraisal was affirmed by "John Van Mator." The estate included six slaves, a man, woman and four children. This suggests that Jan Joosten returned to live on his land at Burlington after purchasing the plantation in Somerset County in 1700. Perhaps son Joost Jans occupied the land in Somerset. "John Van Mator" who approved the inventory must have been Jan Joosten's 23-year-old grandson and namesake, Jan Joosten van Meteren, who anglicized his name to John van Meter.

Sponsored by the Dutch East India Company, the English navigator Henry Hudson discovered the river that now bears his name and explored it as far up as the present site of Albany, New York, in 1609. In 1613 Dutch traders established a settlement on the site of the present city of New York. The Dutch West India Company secured the right to trade in and colonize the area in 1621. This private company established the rules of government and appointed a governor or director-general, Peter Minuit. By 1624 thirty families were settled permanently in the colony. Two years later Minuit purchased Manhattan Island from the Canarsie Indian chiefs for trinkets worth 60 guilders, which has been equated to 24 gold dollars, and named the island New Amsterdam. The Dutch colony of New Netherland in America roughly included what are now the states of Maine and New Jersey and everything in-between. The Dutch concentrated mainly on the fur trade and settlement of the Hudson River valley. In 1664 King Charles II of England granted all of this territory to his brother James, Duke of York, and after the Dutch surrendered the colony to the English without a fight in August 1664, it was renamed New York. The area between the Delaware River and the Atlantic Ocean, now known as New Jersey, was divided into two sections, East Jersey and West Jersey, by a line running from the northwest corner at the New York border, southeasterly to a point about midway on the Atlantic shore, almost directly across the colony from Philadelphia. York then granted East Jersey to John, Lord Berkeley, and West Jersey to Sir George Carteret.


The Van Meterens of Holland and America, Amelia Clay Lewis Van Meter Rogers, Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Frankfort, Volume 34, Number 106, January 1936.
Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston,Ulster County, New York, 1660-1809, Roswell Randall Hoes, De Vinne Press, New York, 1891, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1980.
Historical Atlas of the World, Barnes and Noble Books, New York, 1977.
History of New Paltz, New York, and Its Old Families, Ralph Le Fevre, Albany, 1909, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1973.

[NI0416] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Vol. 1912, #33379
Title: Death Certificate, State Of Florida
Author: Office Of Vital Statistics, State Board Of Health
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED171 Sh12
Date: 17 Jun 1900
Title: 1900 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED39 Sh30 Ln216
Title: 1910 Census, Jackson, Missouri
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Letter From Naomi Marquis
Author: Naomi Marquis
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

!Death Cert. lists age as 68, Father is I. N. Marquis, Mother is Carolina Sherman; 1900 Census lists birth in Nebraska Feb 1884. Letter from Donna's Great Aunt Naomi's lists James H. Marquis as brother to Oliver. Donna's mom remembers nothing of James, but remembers Uncle Bert. Presumably Bert is short for Herbert and James and Bert are the same person. The death certificate lists Nebraska as place of birth. 1910 Census lists spouse. I looked in the Soundex only; census should list years married. Donna's mom says he was married in Plant City, FL. Death certificate says he was divorced. Death certificate says he lived in Polk County for 7 years before his death in 1957 but Frank's obituary says he was living in West Palm Beach in 1955. Death certificate says he was an upholsterer.
CENSUS:
1910 Kansas City, Jackson, MO soundex ED39 sh30 L216
James H. Marquis 27 NE
Thresa 37 IOTexas August 1953 from Obituary

*****

# ID: I11834
# Name: James Herbert Marquis 1 2
# Sex: M
# Birth: FEB 1884 in , , Nebraska 1 2
# Death: 3 OCT 1957 in Lakeland, Polk, Florida 1 2
# Burial: 6 NOV 1957 Oakhill Cem, Lakeland, Polk, Florida 1 2
# Reference Number: MMRJ3S
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Vol. 1912, #33379
Title: Death Certificate, State Of Florida
Author: Office Of Vital Statistics, State Board Of Health
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED171 Sh12
Date: 17 Jun 1900
Title: 1900 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED39 Sh30 Ln216
Title: 1910 Census, Jackson, Missouri
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Letter From Naomi Marquis
Author: Naomi Marquis
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215
!Death Cert. lists age as 68, Father is I. N. Marquis, Moth er is Carolina Sherman; 1900 Census lists birth in Nebrask a Feb 1884. Letter from Donna's Great Aunt Naomi's lists Ja mes H. Marquis as brother to Oliver. Donna's mom remember s nothing of James, but remembers Uncle Bert. Presumably Be rt is short for Herbert and James and Bert are the same per son. The death certificate lists Nebraska as place of birth . 1910 Census lists spouse. I looked in the Soundex only; c ensus should list years married. Donna's mom says he was ma rried in Plant City, FL. Death certificate says he was divo rced. Death certificate says he lived in Polk County fo r 7 years before his death in 1957 but Frank's obituary say s he was Unknown in West Palm Beach in 1955. Death certifica te says he was an upholsterer.
CENSUS:
1910 Kansas City, Jackson, MO soundex ED39 sh30 L216
James H. Marquis 27 NE
Thresa 37 IO



Father: Isaac Newton Marquis b: 27 DEC 1853 in Jackson, Missouri
Mother: Cordelia Alice Sherman b: APR 1858 in Madison, Jefferson, Indiana

Marriage 1 Thresa Unknown b: 1873 in , , Iowa

* Married: in Plant City, Florida 1 2
* Divorced:


Sources:

1. Title: 684427.ged
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 6, 2002
2. Title: wood.FTW
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 20, 2002

[NI0419] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Catherine Blanchan, wife of Louis Du Bois, and her first three children, her sister Marie, wife of Antoine Crespel, and her child, and two of their younger siblings were among the group of women and children taken captive by Indians who attacked and burned Hurley and part of Kingston on 10 June 1663. Also among the prisoners taken by the marauders were Macyken Hendricksen, wife of Jan Joosten van Meteren, and two of her children, one reputedly being Joost Jans van Meteren who later married Sarah Du Bois.

On 05 September 1663 an expedition led by Captain Kregier from New York, including Louis Du Bois and others, surprised the Indians at their fort near the Hogabergh in Shawangunk, and recovered, after almost three months of captivity, the 23 women and children who had been taken from Hurley and Kingston. During the rescue operation, Captain Kregier's men killed 22 Indians, including their chief, and captured 13 prisoners. The white casualties were 5 men dead and 6 wounded. According to tradition, Louis Du Bois killed a sleeping Indian sentry near Nescatock before he could sound an alarm. As the rescuers approached the Indian encampment, they surprised a squaw named Basha who was getting water from the spring just north of the fort. She shouted a warning to her people before Louis Du Bois shot her. She fell dead into the spring which thereafter was known by her name. The Indian village was surrounded by palisades "as thick as a man's body and fifteen feet high" but it was not completed. When the alarm was sounded, the prisoners began to run away with some of the Indians. It has been said that, in his excitement, Louis Du Bois yelled at his wife, "Stop, 'Trene, or I'll shoot you!"

After the death of Louis Du Bois in 1696, Catherine Blanchan married Jean Cottin, a French Huguenot schoolmaster at New Paltz during the period 1689-1699 who moved to Kingston and became a merchant. Her second marriage occurred when she was about 63 years old, probably not too long before 22 September 1702 when, as Catherine Cottin, she made a new will, written in French, that provided for:

... the freedom heretofore bestowed upon her negro woman Rachel shall remain in force and she shall be given thirty pieces of eight before the testatrix' children divide her property; also that the letters of manumission given to her negro woman Dina shall remain in force.

If not the first, this must be one of the earliest acts of emancipation recorded in this country. It was reiterated when Rachel was baptized on 05 September 1703:

After profession of her faith she received the Sacrament of Holy Baptism, aged 17 years. Besides the points required of her in the formula of baptism, she also promised the congregation to serve her mistress, Catharin Cottyn, faithfully and diligently until the death of her mistress, and after that to serve her master, Jan Cottyn, and afterwards she shall be at liberty and free.

History of New Paltz, New York, and Its Old Families, Ralph Le Fevre, Albany, 1909, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1973; Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, NewYork, 1660-1809, Roswell Randall Hoes, De Vinne Press, New York, 1891, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1980; Who Was Who in Hardin County, Hardin County Historical Society, Elizabethtown, 1941, photocopy; The Virginia Germans, Klaus Wust, The University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1969; Immigrant Ancestors, Frederick Adams Virkus, extracted from The Compendium of American Genealogy, Volume VII, Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1980; Ships Passenger Lists New York and New Jersey 1600-1825, Carl Boyer III, Newhall, CA, 1978; data of Alice Lewis Gunter, Independence, MO, Betty Meredith Peger, Brownsville, KY, and Barry W. Downs, Leitchfield, KY, 1984.
The Van Meterens of Holland and America, Amelia Clay Lewis Van Meter Rogers, Register of the Kentucky State Historical Society, Frankfort, Volume 34, Number 106, January, 1936, pp. 22-41.

Prepared by WILLIAM G SCROGGINS 13 Nov 1989
718 Mill Valley Drive, Taylor Mill KY 41015-2278

[NI0420] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

The parents of Chretien Du Bois, a Huguenot who resided at Wicres near Lille in Artois Province, Pas de Calais, France, which is French Flanders, have not been proved but he undoubtedly was related to, perhaps a son of, Wallerand Du Bois and Madeleine de Croix who were married in 1583. Chretien was born in 1597 and died before 10 October 1655.

Wallerand Du Bois was a son of Antoine Du Bois and Philipotte de Landas. Antoine Du Bois was the fifth or sixth generation of the family to be Seigneur de la Bourse, which was near Lille. He became also Seigneur de Beaufermez, which was at Wicres, by his marriage to Philipotte de Landas, Dame of Beaufermez. Antoine Du Bois descended from the Du Bois de Fiennes family by a cadet branch which was founded in the 14th century. By inheritance, Wallerand Du Bois became Seigneur de la Bourse and de Beaufermez. The Billiou (Billau, Bilyou) family had lands adjoining the estates of the Du Bois family and the Seigneur de Beaufermez at Wicres. Francoise Du Bois, daughter of Chretien, married Pierre Billiou. The farm of Chretien Du Bois at Wicres was still being identified in 1909.

The register of La Bassee Parish, within which Wicres is located, indicates that Louis Du Bois, born in 1626, was the third son of Chretien. The two elder sons probably were Antoine Du Bois, who was married in Mannheim, as was Chretien's son Louis, and Isaac Du Bois, who went from France to Leiden, Holland, as did Chretien's children, Jacques and Francoise. The baptismal dates of Anne, Louis and Jacques Du Bois are included in a list of the children of Chretien Du Bois:

Francoise b. 06-17-1622
m. Pierre Billiou
Anne bap. 11-30-1625 (spon. Jean Baptiste du Bois)
Louis bap. 11-13-1626 at Lille, parish church of Wicres
m. Catherine Blanchan at Mannheim
Jacques bap. 10-27-1628 at Lille, parish church of Wicres
m. Pierronne Bentyn

Chretien Du Bois was dead when his son Louis, a resident of Wicres, near La Bassee, and Catherine Blanchan, daughter of Matthieu, were married at the French church of Mannheim on 10 October 1655. The Du Bois marriages in Mannheim were outlined in a letter by Dr. W. Schwarz from Mannheim dated 06 August 1871:

In the year 1606, the Elector Frederick IV of the Palatinate, being an Evangelical Prince and foreseeing a religious war, built the fortified city of Mannheim at the confluence of the Neckar and Rhine Rivers. Soon after, in 1618, there broke out the devastating Thirty Years War and then the youthful fortress of Mannheim was taken and destroyed by the Bavarian General Tilly. The persecuted French Protestants were brotherly received in the German Evangelical country, particularly in the Rhineland. The Walloons were likewise welcomed in Mannheim and allowed to establish their own French Evangelical community with their own clergymen. For a time they were united with the German Evangelical Reformed church, which union was made with the understanding that services and Holy Communion should be held in the French language in the Spring and Autumn.

The civil and church records of Mannheim do not go back beyond the year 1621, the date of the city's destruction. It is only at a later date that the records of the French Protestants are to be found inscribed by French clergymen in the German church book of records.

The name du Bois is found for the first time in 1653:

1. Antoine du Bois and Marie Mesurelles were married on the 6th of August 1653.

2. Louis du Bois, son of the late Chretien du Bois, resident of Wicres in the vicinity of La Bassee, of the first part, and Catherine Blanchan, daughter of Matthieu Blanchan, bourgeois of Mannheim, of the second part, were married at the French church of Mannheim, the 10th of October 1655.

3. Martin du Bois, son of the late Jean du Bois, resident of Wicres in the vicinity of la Bassee, and Jeanne, daughter of Antoine du Rein, bourgeois of Mannheim, were married at the French church on the 20th of August, 1656.

4. Antoine du Bois, widower of Marie Muserol, and Jeanne Scipion, widow of Jean Farinau, were married on the 21st of May, 1661.

There can be found records of Isaac du Bois and of others who went from France to Holland, particularly to Leyden.

There are still members of the du Bois family residing in Mannheim. The unmarried goldsmith Johann William du Bois died there 9 October 1849 aged 841/4 years. His sister, Anna Catharine du Bois, also unmarried, died 27 October 1849, aged 82 1/4 years. The relatives of this brother and sister were the Burgher and Goldsmith Johann George du Bois and his wife Helene Catharine, born Beinhauer.

For the truth of this extract, Mannheim, the 6th of August 1871.
Dr. W. Schwarz (Seal) The Evangelical Protestant Clergyman.

Jean Du Bois, who was dead when his son, Martin, of Wicres, was married on 20 August 1656, may have been a brother of Chretien Du Bois.

Perhaps Jean Baptiste Du Bois, who sponsored the baptism of Anne Du Bois, daughter of Chretien, on 30 November 1625, was the father of Martin Du Bois.

Du Bois has been called one of the oldest of the noble houses of the Cotentin Peninsula in Normandy. It was founded by Geoffroi Du Bois, a knight-banneret and companion of Duke William of Normandy in the conquest of England in 1066. Jacques Du Bois, Baron de Fiennes, of Artois descended from Geoffroi Du Bois and his wife Sidonie Tesson. The Du Bois family was known as the "Grand Masters of the Forests of France." Of course, the word "bois" means forest in French.

1. History of New Paltz, New York, and Its Old Families, Ralph Le Fevre, Albany, 1909, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1973; Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, New York, 1660-1809, Roswell Randall Hoes, De Vinne Press, New York, 1891, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1980; Who Was Who in Hardin County, Hardin County Historical Society, Elizabethtown, 1941, photocopy; The Virginia Germans, Klaus Wust, The University Press of Virginia, Charlottesville, 1969; Immigrant Ancestors, Frederick Adams Virkus, extracted from The Compendium of American Genealogy, Volume VII, Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1980; Ships Passenger Lists New York and New Jersey 1600-1825, Carl Boyer III, Newhall, CA, 1978; data of Alice Lewis Gunter, Independence, MO, Betty Meredith Peger, Brownsville, KY, and Barry W. Downs, Leitchfield, KY, 1984.
The American Descendants of Chretien de Bois of Wicres, France, William Heidgerd, Huguenot Historical Society, New Paltz, New York, 1968, partial photocopy from Philip C. Ellsworth, Bethany, OK, 1986.

Prepared by WILLIAM G SCROGGINS 13 Nov 1989
718 Mill Valley Drive, Taylor Mill KY 41015-2278

[NI0421] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

The parents of Matthieu Blanchan, who was born in the village of Neuville in the Province of Artois, and his wife Madeleine Joris have not been determined. (1)

Names were spelled in many variations in the early records of Ulster County as French and Dutch dialects were intermingled. Matthieu was written as Matheus, Mattys and Mathys, while his surname appears as Blancjean, Blanjan, Blanchan, Blanchant, Blanchon, Blancon and Blanchamp. His correct name may have been Blancjean, pronounced "Blahnchon." Madeleine was spelled Maddelene, Madelena, Maddelena, Magdaleine, Magdaleen, Magdalena, and Magdaleentje with Joris as Joorise. There has been no overall attempt to reconcile the various spellings of names from the records.

Matthieu Blanchan and his wife Madeleine Joris (Maddeleen Jorisse) came to America on The Gilded Otter which arrived in New Amsterdam in June 1660 from England. They were accompanied on their voyage by their three youngest children and their daughter Marie (Maria), with her husband Antoine Crespel (Anthony Crispell) and their children. The passengers on The Gilded Otter, which sailed for America on 27 April 1660, were the first Huguenot refugees to emigrate to New Netherland. The Gilded Otter arrived in New Amsterdam in June 1660, where Matthieu Blanchan obtained a letter from Governor Stuyvesant to Sergeant Romp at Esopus, a community near Wiltwyck (later Kingston, New York). They were living in Wiltwyck (Kingston) by 07 December 1660 when they were present there for the first celebration of the Lord's Supper by Dominie Blom.

The three youngest children of Matthieu Blanchan were aged 12, 9 and 5 years when they sailed to America: (2)

April 26, 1660. in De Vergulde Otter (The Gilded Otter),
Captain Cornelis Reyersz Van der Beets.

Mattheus Blanchard, farmer, from Artois, wife and three children, 12, 9, and 5 years old.

Anthony Krypel, farmer, from Artois, and wife.

Based on the dates of their marriages, the children probably were in order, Madeleine, Elizabeth and Matthieu, Jr. Catherine and Marie must have been born before 1640, since Catherine was married in 1655 and Marie was married and had two children by 1660.

Catherine Blanchan, her husband Louis Du Bois and their first two sons followed her parents to America, probably on the St. Jan Baptist (St. Jean Baptiste) from England which landed on 06 August 1661. That year Matthieu Blanchan, Sr., and his sons-in-law, Antoine Crespel and Louis Du Bois, settled in Hurley, a new village near Kingston.

Louis Du Bois, who married Catherine Blanchan, was a son of Chretien Du Bois, a Huguenot of Wicres near Lille in Artois Province. Louis was a leader of the French Huguenot settlers at New Paltz, New York. Louis and Catherine were French Huguenots who married in Mannheim, Germany, in 1655.

Matthieu Blanchan probably was born before 1620, since he was married and had children apparently born before 1640. Artois Province or the County of Artois was in the part of The Netherlands, or United Provinces, controlled by the Spanish, during the period when Matthieu Blanchan was born and lived there. Lille is in the area of Flanders now in France, near the Belgian border.

Matthieu Blanchan left his home in Artois, undoubtedly searching for religious freedom, and was residing in Mannheim when Louis Du Bois moved there from Wicres. Mannheim, "in Baden, Germany, on the right bank of the Rhine, 66 miles S.S.W. of Frankfort," was the capitol of the Palatinate or Paltz, a small principality of the Holy Roman Empire in 1648. At this time Mannheim was a refuge for the Huguenots seeking to escape persecution in nearby France. Despite the religious freedom granted by the Edict of Nantes in 1598, these French Protestants were in constant conflict with the Catholic majority. Matthieu Blanchan became acquainted with Louis Du Bois and a marriage between his daughter Catherine and Louis was arranged. Catherine and Louis had at least two sons, Abraham and Isaac, born to them in Mannheim before they emigrated to America.

Two of the younger children of Matthieu Blanchan and Madeleine Joris, their daughter Catherine Blanchan Du Bois, and three of her children, and their daughter Marie Blanchan Crespel, and one of her children, were among the group of women and children taken captive by Indians who attacked and burned Hurley and part of Kingston on 10 June 1663. On 05 September 1663 an expedition led by Captain Kregier from New York and Louis Du Bois surprised the Indians at their fort near the Hogabergh in Shawangunk, and recovered, after almost three months of captivity, the 23 women and children who had been taken from Hurley and Kingston. The author identified two of the captives as children of Matthieu Blanchan, Jr., but he did not marry until 30 March 1679:

Matys Blanjan, de jonge (i. e. junior), j.m., of Manheim, in the Palts (Palatinate), and Margrietje Claas Van Schoonhoove, j.d., from New Albanien (New Albany). In the absence of Domine Van Gaasbeeck, they were married in the church by the Secretary (of the village). First publication of Banns, 1 March.

The abbreviations "j.m." and "j.d." are the initials for the Dutch words for "young man" and "young woman," which were not intended to imply that the persons were young in age but that they had never been married before.

The description "of Manheim" suggests that Matthieu, Jr. was born there. In her marriage record, Madeleine (Madalena) Blanchan was identified as "of Engelant" which suggests that she was born there during the sojourn of her parents in that country before they continued on to America. The marriages of Madeleine and her sister Elizabeth appear on lists of weddings, by a justice of the peace, recorded by William de la Montagne in 1667 and 1668 but the actual date of the marriage is not given:

1667. Jan Matthysen, j.m., of Fort Orange (Fort Orange now Albany), and Madalena Blanchan, j.d., of Engelant (England). Banns published three times 'in succession,' 28 Sept. Married by the Hon. Justice.

1668. Pieter Cornelissen, and Elisabet Blansjan, j.d. Date of Banns not given.

Peter Corneliussen (son of Cornelius), who married Elizabeth Blanchan, came from Holstein in 1659 and was known as Peter Cornelius Louw (Low). They had sons Matthew, Peter, Cornelius, Jacob, who was born in 1683, Johannes and Abraham, who was born in 1688.

The Huguenot residents of Kingston and Hurley decided to form a settlement of their own, so Louis Du Bois and eleven associates (his sons Abraham Du Bois and Isaac Du Bois, his brother-in-law Antoine Crespel, Christian Deyo and his son Pierre Deyo, the brothers Abraham and Jean Hasbrouck, the brothers Andre and Simon Le Fever, Hugo Freer, and Louis Bevier) purchased a tract of land from the Esopus Indians on 26 May 1677. It was described as "comprising the Paltz patent, occupying all the present town of Lloyd, about two-thirds of New Paltz, one-third of Esopus and one-fourth of Rosendale." The purchase was confirmed in a patent from Governor Edmund Andros on 29 September 1677, with the four corners of the grant being identified as, "Moggonck - now Mohonk; Juffrou's Hook, the point in the Hudson where the town line between Lloyd and Marlborough strikes the river; Rapoos - Pell's Island, and Tower a Toque, a point of white rocks in the Shawangunks near Rosendale Plains." The ancient documents, long stored in a trunk in the Huguenot Bank at New Paltz, were translated from the Dutch by the Reverend Ame Vennema.

Matthieu Blanchan and Madeleine Joris were sponsors or witnesses to the baptisms of some of their grandchildren. It was the custom of the Dutch to baptize children a few days after their birth:

Jacob, child of Lowi Duboi and Cateryn Blanchan, baptized 09 October 1661 in the presence of Anton Crepel and Maddeleen Joorise.

Marimaddeleen, child of Anton Crepel and Maria Blanchan, baptized 12 February 1662 in the presence of Mattys Blanchan, Cateryn Blanchan, and Maddeleen Blanchan.

Sara, child of Lowies du Boey and Cateryn Blanchon, baptized 14 September 1664 in the presence of Gerret Arentsen and Maddeleen Blanchan.

Pieter, child of Anton Crepel and Mari Blanchan, baptized 21 December 1664 in the presence of Hendrick Arentsen and Barber Jans.

Lysbet, child of Anton Crepel and Mari Blanchan, baptized 03 October 1666 in the presence of Jan Cornelisse and Lysbet Blanchan.

David, son of Lowies Duboeys and Cateryn Blanchan, baptized 13 March 1667 in the presence of Andries Pietersen and Lysbet Blanchan.

Maddeleen Blanchan and Mattys Mattysen were present when Geertjen, child of Jan Jansen and Cateryntje Mattysen, was baptized on 09 October 1667.

Lysbet, child of Antony Crupel and Marie Blancan, baptized 15 October 1668 with no witnesses named.

Marregarita, child of Jan Tysen and Madaleen Blanchan, was baptized 15 October 1668 in the presence of Thomas Chambers and Madelena Blanchan.

Rebecca, child of Lowies du Booys and Catharina (no surname given), baptized 18 June 1671 in the presence of Jan Joosten and Jacomeyntie Barents Slecht.

Sara, child of Anthony Crupel and Maria Blansjan, baptized 18 June 1671 with no witnesses named.

Matthys, child of Jan Tysen and Madalena Blansjan, baptized 18 June 1671 in the presence of Mattue Blansjan, senior, Mattys Mattysen, junior, and Margriet Hendricksen.

Jan, child of Anthony Chrispel and Maria (surname not given), baptized 21 July 1674 in the presence of Mattue Blansjan, junior and Maria -------.

Ragel, child of Lowies du Booys and Catharina Blansjan, baptized in April 1675 in the presence of Jan Tysen and Margariedt Chambers.

Hendrick, child of Jan Matysse and Magdalena Blanjan, baptized 06 April 1679 in the presence of Wessel Ten Broeck and Annetie Matysse.

Maddeleen Blanjan and Jan Matysse witnessed the baptism of Kryn, child of Jan Jansse Van Oosterhout and Annetie Gilles 31 August 1679.

Matys, child of Matys Blanjan, junior, and Margriet Claassen, was baptized 30 November 1679 in the presence of Matys Blanjan, senior, Hendrick Claasse and Lysbet Blanjan.

Davit, child of Jan Mattyssen and Maddelena Blansyan was baptized 24 April 1681 in the presence of Mattys Slegt and Laurensy Chambers.

Marya Maddeleen Cruipel and Mattys Cornelis Sleght had a daughter Maria Maddeleen who was baptized 28 August 1681 in the presence of Cornelis Sleght and Pieternel Cruepel.

Anna, child of Pieter Cornelisz Lau and Elysabeth Blan Jean, was baptized 25 September 1681 in the presence of Matys Slegt, Cathrina Blan Jean and Sara Kellenaar.

Nicolaus, child of Mathys Blan Jean and Margriet Lasse, was baptized 02 July 1682 in the presence of Hendric Claasz, Willem Jacobz and Magdaleen Blan Jean.

Magdaleen Blan Jean, Jan Tyse and Cornelis Switz were present when Tirck, child of Mattys Matysz and Tjaatie Wit, was baptized 24 December 1682.

Abraham, child of Pieter Cornelisz Lou and Elysabeth Blan Jean, was baptized 15 July 1683 in presence of Jan Tyse and Margriet Claas.

Cornelia, child of Matthys Blan Jean and Margriet Claasz, was baptized at Horley (Hurley) 07 October 1683 with no witnesses named.

Margriet, child of Jan Tyse and Magdaleen Blanjan, was baptized 14 January 1684 in the presence of Benjamin Provoost and Margriet Claasz.

Maria, child of Pieter Lau and Lysbet Blanjean, was baptized 01 January 1686 in the presence of Jan Tyse and Magdaleen Blanjean.

Magdalena, child of Matys Blanjean and Margriet Claasz, was baptized 07 March 1686 in the presence of Jan Matysz and Magdaleen Blanjean.

Sara, child of Jan Matysz and Magdalena Blanjean, was baptized 08 October 1686 in the presence of Henricus Beekman and Sara Kellenaar.

Catheryne, child of Matthieu Blanchamp and Marguerite Schoonhoove, was baptized 07 May 1688 in the presence of Jan Joost, Catheryne Blanckchamp and Sara Du Bois.

Jacob, son of Pieter Low and Lysbeth Blanchon, was baptized 24 June 1688 in the presence of Jacob du Bois and Marie Magdaleine (surname not given).

Catheryn, child of Jan Mattysen and Magdalaine Blanchamp, was baptized 30 September 1688 in the presence of Jacob Du Bois and Catheryne Blanchamp.

Jan Mattys and Magdaleine Blanchamp were present when Maria, child of Benjamin Provost and Eltje Albersen, was baptized 24 March 1689.

Mattys Blanchamp, Roulof Swartwoudt and Cornelia Fredericx were present when Ifje, child of Hendrick Klaes and Cornelia Swartwoudt, was baptized 28 April 1689.

In 1676 Matthieu Blanchan, Louis Du Bois, Antoine Crespel and about sixty other residents of Wiltwyck and Hurley petitioned Governor Andros for a minister to be sent to Esopus to preach in English and Dutch, recommending the Reverend Peter Teschenmaker for the position.

Matthieu Blanchan had a contract with Jacques Du Bois, brother of his son-in-law Louis, which was outstanding when Jacques died at Kingston in 1676. In 1677 John L. Pietersy, who married Pierronne (Pieternelle) Bentyn, the widow of Jacques Du Bois, agreed with Matthieu Blanchan to fulfill the contract. Pietersy secured a loan from Matthieu Blanchan with some land at Ryssel in Lille in Flanders that had belonged to Jacques Du Bois.

Madeleine Joris apparently died after 15 October 1668 when "Marregarita, child of Jan Tysen and Madaleen Blanchan, was baptized 15 October 1668 in the presence of Thomas Chambers and Madelena Blanchan." Although it was customary in this society for wives to frequently use their maiden names in documents, it was not always done. The sponsor Madelena Blanchan must have been Madeleine Joris Blanchan since the mother Madaleen Blanchan was not likely the sponsor.

Matthieu Blanchan was alive as late as 30 November 1679, when he was present at the baptism of his grandson Matthieu III, "Matys, child of Matys Blanjan, junior, and Margriet Claassen, was baptized in the presence of Matys Blanjan, senior, Hendrick Claasse and Lysbet Blanjan." The will of Matthieu Blanchan, dated 07 September 1665, identifies him as a native of Neuville in Artois and provides that his wife Magdalena Joris retain his entire estate in America, the land in Artois where he was born, land in Armentiers and in other places as long as she remained a widow. She was instructed to keep the minor children, Magdalena, Elizabeth and Matthieu, until they became old enough to marry and that, when the minor daughters married, she was to treat them the same as she did the daughters who were married.

Louis Du Bois and his wife Catherine Blanchan moved from New Paltz to Kingston in 1686 and he died there ten years later. In an unusual bequest, Louis left a full half of his property to his wife Catherine in the event that she remarried, so Catherine has been described as a rich woman for those days. Much of her property may have come to her and her husband from her father Matthieu Blanchan who was depicted as a very rich man. Sometime after the will of Louis Du Bois was proved on 13 July 1697 and when she was about 63 years old, Catherine Blanchan married (2) Jean Cottin, a French Huguenot who was one of the schoolmasters in New Paltz during the years 1689-1701. In 1701 Jean Cottin sold his house in New Paltz to Hugo Freer, which may be about the time he moved to Kingston where he married Catherine Blanchan and became a merchant. They were married before 22 September 1702, when she made a will as Catherine Cottin.

Catherine probably died in 1706 when her children divided their father's estate by deeds of gift to each other. Jean Cottin died about 1723.

Madeleine Joris must have been related to Cornelis Joris who lived at Lessa (Lay Sie or Lazy) Point on the Delaware River in West Jersey in 1666: (3)

1678 May 14. Certificate of Govr Carteret, that Cornelis Joris, Jurien Marcellis and Jan Claessen, alias Jan Swart, lived at Lay Sie Point, opposite Mantinicum Island, in the time of the Dutch, and that on his visit there in 1666 he had promised to confirm their Dutch patents.

By meaningful coincidence, Jan Joosten van Meteren of Kingston, New York, whose son Joosten Jan married Sarah Du Bois, daughter of Louis Du Bois and Catherine Blanchan and granddaughter of Madeleine Joris, bought land at Lessa Point on 18 October 1695. Lessa Point, also known as Wingerworth Point, was at the mouth of Assiscunk Creek in the city of Burlington. Mantinicum Island is now called Burlington Island. Jan Joosten van Meteren sold his interest in this land soon afterward and bought land in East Jersey on the Raritan River in 1700. In 1714 his daughter-in-law Sarah Du Bois, her brother Jacob Du Bois and her sons, Jan Joosten (John) and Isaac van Meteren (van Meter), bought land in Salem County, West Jersey. Perhaps they were motivated to move to Jersey by Cornelis Joris.

NOTES:
. All genealogical data extracted from the following sources, unless otherwise indicated:

1. History of New Paltz, New York, and Its Old Families, Ralph Le Fevre, Albany, 1909, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1973

2. Baptismal and Marriage Registers of the Old Dutch Church of Kingston, Ulster County, New York, 1660-1809, Roswell Randall Hoes, De Vinne Press, New York, 1891, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1980

3 . Ships Passenger Lists New York and New Jersey 1600-1825, Carl Boyer III, Newhall, CA, 1978, page 125, citing New York Colonial Mss., Vol. XIV., p. 97.

4 . Patents and Deeds and Other Early Records of New Jersey, 1664-1703, William Nelson, The Press Printing and Publishing Company, Paterson, NJ, 1899, reprinted Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1976.
Prepared by William G. Scroggins 13 Nov 1989; 718 Mill Valley Drive; Taylor Mill, KY 41015-2278

[NI0428] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Bios: Hoge Family History 1730's -: Chester/Cumberland/Fayette/Washington Cos, PA Contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives by Ross B Kenzie rossbk@localnet.com and/or M Burns. mburns@tea-house.com

Copy of a letter received by Mr. F. L. Hoge Uniontown, PA August 31, 1880

Mr. F. L. Hoge Wheeling, W. VA. Dear Sir:

I have to thank you for your favor of yesterday. You are no doubt acquainted with the romantic history and marriage of William Hoge and Barbara Hume, so I will not repeat it. He was from Musselburg, and she from Paisley, Scotland. His father was Sir James Hoge, her father was a Knight and a Baron, and nearly related to the Royal House of Stuart of Scotland, so this takes you back to King Robert the Second of Scotland, born about 1300.

The Rev. William Henry Foot of Romney, WVa., in his "Sketches of Virginia", second series, gives a pretty full account of the descendants of William Hoge and Barbara Hume, but he mistakes many particulars. He makes your ancestor, William Hoge (the Quaker), the oldest son; this is a mistake; their oldest son was John Hoge, who never moved to VA. They lived in Chester Co., PA., and while the father and the balance of the family moved to the Valley of VA., about 1735, or before, John Hoge, the oldest son, moved to the Cumberland Valley about nine miles west of Harrisburg, and settled in village of Hogestown now stands, owned a large body of land, and lived and died there about 1752.

While the family lived in Chester Co., John Hoge married Gwenthloon Bowen, a Welch woman, while your ancestor, William Hoge, married a Quaker. John Hoge had four sons, John Hoge, Bunyan Hoge, Jonathan Hoge, and David Hoge, and four daughters. Of the daughters I will say nothing now, it would make the story too long; enough to say that names of their descendants have been distinguished both in church and state.

John was the Rev. John Hoge, who first preached at Opequan Church near Kernstown, where his grandfather lived, as mentioned by Dr. Foot; he left no issue. Bunyan died young. Jonathan Hoge was a prominent man in Cumberland Co., when all this part of Penna. was Cumberland Co., and through the Indian, Catfish, became the owner of the land where the town of Washington, Penna, now stands.

David Hoge's two sons, John Hoge and William Hoge, in 1782 came to Washington (Pa) and laid out the town of Washington, (see Dr. Creigh's History of Washington Co.), and there they both lived and died, both distinguished men. William Hoge was a member of Congress during Jefferson's entire administration, and died in 1814. If you are in Washington, go to the old graveyard and see his tombstone. John Hoge was also in Congress, and held many important offices in PA. He died in 1823 leaving no issue. David Hoge was Receiver of Public money at the land office at Steubenville, OH, from the beginning to the end of that office at that place, and died there in 1845, leaving several sons and daughters.

The only son now living is Joseph Hoge, a lawyer, who is in San Moreno Co., CA. He resided at one time in Illinois, and was a member of Congress from that state from 1842 to 1846, representing the Galena district. He afterward went to California. Jonathan Hoge moved to near Morgantown, W. VA., had two sons and died there. One son moved to southern Illinois and died, leaving several children. The other son lives in or near Washington, PA.

Amy Hoge, a daughter of David Hoge, married Alex Blaine. They had several children. Squire Blaine (not Fph.) lived and died at Washington, PA. A descendant lived in Wheeling, named Simms, and the only survivor of that branch, L. Q. R. Laidly, lived a few years ago in Charlestown, W. VA., and may be still there. L. Halsey Wells, cashier of the Second National Bank, Pittsburgh, is a descendent; George Shiras, the distinguished lawyer of Pittsburgh was another, and many other whom you and your brother no doubt know. This Mrs Blaine is the only one of David Hoge's daughters who left many descendents. Jane Hoge, another daughter, married Captain James Blaine; she died shortly after marriage without issue. Her husband then married a Miss Lyon, and they were the grandparents of Senator James Blaine whom we all know. The other daughter of David Hoge, married the Rev. Samuel Waugh, of Silver Spring, Cumberland Co. She had several children, but they are all dead. The third daughter, Mary Hoge, married Dr. John Hoge Irwin, and their daughter, my wife, is the only descendent of that branch, and she was born in Wheeling.

William Hoge and Barbara Hume have sons: John Hoge, William Hoge, Alexander Hoge, James Hoge, and George Hoge. We have disposed of John Hoge and William Hoge. Alexander Hoge became a lawyer of eminence, lived near Winchester, was a member of the first Congress of the U.S., and of the Virginia convention that adopted the Constitution of the US.

James Hoge was the father of the Rev. Moses Hoge, the distinguished divine, and who was the ancestor of the several preachers of the name in many parts of the country, including the present Rev. Moses Hoge of Richmond, VA, and Rev. James Hoge of Columbus, OH.

George Hoge moved to North Carolina. Do you know to which of the families Judge Hoge of Martinsburg, W. VA, belongs? It seems that most of the descendants come from through the son William Hoge, your ancestor, more than all the balance put together.

The little old church at Opequan has burnt down since the war. I think in remembrance of their ancestor, William Hoge, who had the first one built, (this is the third one), the Hoges (set) out to rebuild it. The little schoolhouse is still standing, one hundred years old; the burying ground is in good repair. I have a copy of the deed which William Hoge made for the ground on which the church, the school house and the graveyard are, dated Feb. 19, 1745.

I will be glad to have the Princeton Reviews to which you refer. This has been written "Currente Calamo", so you must excuse it.

Very truly yours,

D. Kaine

Again refer to the same reference listed above, pg. 4-9

We doubt if another family has given so many ministers of the gospel or men of prominence in all church, scholastic and benevolent works. We have been able to count among the names we have secured over fifty ministers of the gospel. eighteen have been chosen as members of congress, not to mention many who have been nominated for this position, and the list is quite large of those who have been senators, judges, foreign ministers, governors, etc., etc...

And let it be remembered with especial pride and pleasure that among the long list of names that have been obtained, not against a single one is there known a charge of unlawful behavior. Even the number of those who have been given to the use of intoxicating drink could be counted on the fingers of one's hands.

Surely this is not a family to be ashamed of! Some may be, or may have been poor and may have dropped somewhat in the social scale, but they have been honest, and let the poor but honorable ones be esteemed as highly as those who have won honor and distinction.

A very able and cultivated member of the family, Thomas C. Hoge, of New York, in writing to Rev. Moses D. Hoge, D.D., says with commendable pride, "There is no grander or nobler lineage in this or any other country than this one and my researches warrant me in saying that I know of none to equal it. in our earlier history, our ancestors-were princes and gentlemen, noble not only in blood, but noble of soul; and generation after generation, through centuries of time, have come and passed away, each leaving the same unwavering record of high lofty character, undeviating Christian principles, humble faith and devotion and social supremacy, which neigher change of time nor circumstance nor condition could deteriorate. it is a curious fact that the underlying characteristics of the family appear to have always the same."
*****************
Wills: William Hoge, 1749: Nottingham Twp, Chester Co

Contributed for use in USGenWeb Archives by M. Burns. mburns@tea-house.com

Resident of Chester County, Penna.... Admitted for probate Wednesday Nov. 15, 1749, in Frederick County, VA.

William Hoge's Last Will and Testament:

In the name of God Amen. This eighteenth day of April in the year of Our Lord one thousand seven hundred and twenty nine. I, William Hoge, of Nottingham in ye County of Chester and Provence of Pennsylvania lands, a farmer, being very sick and weak in body, but of perfect mind and memory, Thanks be given unto God therefore, calling unto mind ye mortality of my body and knowing yt it is appointed for all men once to dy, do make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament, yt is to say principally and first of all I give and recommend it to ye earth be buried in a Christian like and decent manner, at the descretion of my Executors. Nothing doubting but at ye general Resurrection I shall receive ye same again by ye mighty power of God and as touching such worldly (goods) wherewith it has pleased God to bless me in this life, devise and dispose of ye same in ye following maner form--. Imprimus my will is yt all my just debts and funeral charges be paid as soon as conveniently they can after my decease‹ Secondly my will is yt Barbara my will beloved wife shal have ye benefit of ye plantation whereon I now live during her life‹ Thirdly my will is yt my son John Hoge shall fully be possessed of yt tract of land yt I made over to him by Deed of Gift‹ Fourthly is yt my son William Hoge shall have yt 100 a. of land whereon he now lives which is secured to him by a bill of sale‹ Fiftly is yt my will is yt my son-in-law Noal Thomson shall have 100 a. of land whereon he lives during his life and at his decease to be his wife and her heirs forever‹ Sixly that my son in law Robert White shal have 5 shillings‹ Sevently my will is yt my sons Allexander, James and George shall have ye remainder of my land to be equally divided amongst them by men of their own choosing yt there is no difference between them nor go to law one with another about it‹ Eightly my will is yt my daughter Joroter Hoge will have 50 pounds in money or value thereof leveyed out of ye stock and what debts is due to me and if that will not be so yt ye remainder be raised of ye plantation‹ Ninthly and lastly. I likewise constitute make and ordain George Galassbey of Newcastle County and Barbara my well beloved wife Executor and Executrix of this my last will and testament. And I do hereby utterly disallow revoke and disanull all other forms testaments wills and legacies bequests executors by me in any way before this time named willed and bequeathed, Ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament, In witness whereof I have here- unto set my hand and seal ye day and year above written; William Hoge [seal]

Signed sealed published pronounced and declared by ye William Hoge to be his last Will and Testament in ye presence of us subscribers, We: John Ruddoll, Enoch Job, William Rogers Admitted for probate Wednesday Nov. 15, 1749, in Frederick County, VA.
********
"History of the Middle River Settlements, West Virginia," by D.E. Johnson

"William Hoge, distinguished in state and church, came to America in 1682. he was the son of Sir James Hoge of Scotland, who lived in Mussleburg near Glasco. On board the Caledonia, the vessel that brought him over, was a family named Hume, consisting of a father, mother and daughter. They were Presbyterians, leaving Scotland to avoid the persecution.

The Humes were from Paisley Scotland. The father was a knight and a Baron. Both mother and father died during the voyage to America, leaving their daughter in charge of young William Hoge, who placed her with relatives, the Johnsons, in New York City, while he decided to make his home in Perth Amboy, New Jersey on land owned by a Scotch company, at the head of which was Gov. Berkley, and of which he was a member.

Later William Hoge returned to New York and married the girl Barbara Hume. After the birth of his first son, John, He and his wife made their home for some time in Chester Co., PA."

Barbara and William later moved to Delaware, and then to Chester Co, PA, East Nottingham Township, before 1735 to Frederick Co., Virginia, where they located about 2 to 3 miles south of Winchester on the Great Wagon Road.

William Hoge died before August 8, 1749, when his will was filed and recorded in Frederick County Clerk's ofice. (Will Book 1, pp. 338-339).
*******
ABRIDGED COMPENDIUM, Frederick Virkus
A compendium of family genealogies that includes practically every name distinguished in the early history of the country, Vol. I

p 3492 HOGE, William (1660-1745), from Scotland ca. 1680; settled at Perth Amboy, N.J., 1689; founder of Washington Co., Pa; settled finally at Opequon, Va.; m Barbara Hume (1670-1745).

P 1646 William Hoge, from Scotland with his wife, 484 Barbara Hume (grand niece of David Hume, eminent English historian and philosopher), to Va., 1764.
********
A Genealogical History of the Dunlevy Family
Author: Gwendolyn Dunlevy Kelley
Call Number: CS71.D86

P 223
THE WHITE FAMILY (AND NOTES ON THE HOGE NAME.)
THE SETTLING IN WINCHESTER, VIRGINIA.

Foote says (page 457): "About the year 1735, Wm. Hoge removed from Pennsylvania, and settled on the Opeckon, three miles south of Winchester, Va., (Frederick County). Opeckon meeting house stands upon his tract of land.

The families of Glass, Vance, Allen, Colvin, White and others soon joined him and formed the Opeckon congregation, the oldest west of the Blue Ridge."

These names are all found in the early records of the Scotch-Irish of Pennsylvania."

(Dr. Robert White married Margaret Hoge, eldest daughter of William Hoge.)

THE WHITE FAMILY
(Extract from Hayden's "Virginia Genealogies." (Page 457), "Excussus Vance."
"The Virginia Vances were of Scotch-Irish descent. They emigrated to Virginia, through Pennsylvania from the North of Ireland. Foote says: "About the year 1735, William Hoge removed from Pennsylvania and settled upon the Opeckon, three miles south of Winchester, Va., (Frederick County. Opeckon meeting house stands upon his tract of land. The families of Glass, Vance, Allen, Colvin, White and others soon joined him, and formed the Opeckon congregation, the oldest west of the Blue Ridge."

(Sketches of Virginia S. 1, p. 102.) These names are all found in the early records of the Scotch-Irish of Pennsylvania, especially in Lauer and Dauph. Counties."

[NI0437] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Ulrick and wife Jane purchased land in Frederick Co., Va. on the drains of Back Crk.--Greg Wulker

[NI0451] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: #5241
Citation Comments: Certificate says "Still Birth".
Title: Death Certificate, State Of Florida
Author: Office Of Vital Statistics, State Board Of Health
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

!Donna's mom says they lost a baby in Lake Worth who was buried where Main Street is now.

[NI0456] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: #60304, Palm Beach County
Title: Death Certificate, State Of Florida
Author: Office Of Vital Statistics, State Board Of Health
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

!Donna's mom says his wife was named Thelma and that they were divorced. He had no children. Florida marriage records say Thelma Green Marquis got married again in 1935. Donna's mom says they had twins that were stillborn.

Obituary, The Palm Beach Post, Thursday, July 13, 1967, B5
Carl R. Marquis, 59, of 1237 Roebuck Ct., West Palm Beach, died Tuesday.
Survivors include his brother, Billy S. Marquis of Houston, Tex.; one sister, Mrs. Florence Rogers of Houston, Tex.; one aunt, Mrs. Naomi Marquis of West Palm Beach.
Services will be at 3 p.m. Friday at Hillcrest Cemetery.
Friends may call from 7 to 9 p.m. today and from 9 a.m. to service time Friday at Mizell-Faville-Zern Hibiscus St. Chapel.

[NI0465] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!Nathaniel, his spouse and his ancestry back to Philip were obtained from Art Cohan from Harlingen, Texas. He used the book, Some Descendants of Philip Sherman, pub. 1968 by Roy V. Sherman. Sharon K Weaver gives his birth as 1748 in North Kingstown, RI. Ellen Gayle Layton lists about 1748 in RI. She references "The Ancestors and Descendants of Philip Shearman, the first secretary and recorder of the colony of Rhode Island" by Frank Dempster Sherman, 1908. She sent copies of several pages. It refers to his will, proved May 9, 1826, Wickford, RI. It is badly damaged by fire but talks of his wife Elizabeth; nephew Nathaniel, son of sister, Sarah, wife of Silas Sherman; John R Sherman; and the widow of the late Elijah Sherman. He is titled Captain in many references.

He was a soldier in the Revolution. A "Havens' Sherman enlisted at Exeter, R. I. for three months Sept. 18, 1776 (R.I.V.R. p. 252) Captain Nathaniel Havens Sherman was in command of the 4th Company, North Kingston Regt., Rhode Island Militia in 1781 and 1783. (Civil & Military Records, Rhode Island Vol. 1 1647-1800 p. 404 for 1781 service and p. 422 for 1783.)
His will was badly damaged by fire. I have searched for years for information on this family and am still searching. It is possible that he is the one in Ballstown, Albany Co., New York in the Census of 1790. If so, at that time he had: 2 males over 16; 5 males under 16; 7 females over 16. F.D.S. 1685; R.I.V.R.: R.V.S.

[NI0466] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!Sharon K Weaver gives birth date, death date and location and
father's name. Ellen Gayle Layton gives similar data except the
birth is about 1759, death is in South Kingston, RI, and she give
marriage information. Elizabeth was 14 when married. He was 25.

[NI0467] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!All information from Sharon K Weaver and from Ellen Gayle Layton.
She references "The Ancestors and Descendants of Philip Shearman,
the first secretary and recorder of the colony of Rhode Island" by
Frank Dempster Sherman, 1908. She sent copies of several pages. It
lists kids and the following:" He drowned by capsizing of the ferry
boat between Jamestown and North Kingstown, RI. Saunderstown Ferry.
He was admitted freeman, Apr 30 1751. Capt of 2nd Company, N.K. in
1767.
His estate was administered, Mar 14, 1768, by his widow. Her estate
was administered, Jun 12, 1775, by her son Nathaniel Havens Shearmen."

[NI0468] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!All information from Sharon K Weaver.

[NI0469] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!All information from Sharon K Weaver and from Ellen Gayle Layton.
She references "The Ancestors and Descendants of Philip Shearman,
the first secretary and recorder of the colony of Rhode Island" by
Frank Dempster Sherman, 1908. She sent copies of several pages. It
lists kids and the following:" He was a farmer in North
Kingstown,RI. His will dated,____ 1750, proved Jan 2, 1751, in North
Kingstown gives to wife, Mary Shearman; to son, Benoni 'the house
and 100 acres where I now live'; to sons Steven and Thomas, '20
acres that were my brother Samuel's. If my son Stephen shall live to
come...may be divided between my daughters, Mary ans Rhoda
Shearman.' His wife was executrix. Inventory was 1250 pounds." It
also references probate and vital records of North Kingstown,RI.

[NI0470] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!All information from Sharon K Weaver and from Ellen Gayle Layton.
She references "The Ancestors and Descendants of Philip Shearman,
the first secretary and recorder of the colony of Rhode Island" by
Frank Dempster Sherman, 1908. Referring to Mary's will, it says:
Mary (Sweet) Shearman's will dated Dec 24, 1770, proved May 8,
1775. Gives grandsons Elisha and Job, sons of "my son Stephen
Shearman, deceased"; grandson Nathaniel, "son of son Benoni
Shearman, deceased"; granddaughter Rhoda, "daughter of my son Thomas
Shearman"; and to son, Thomas Shearman, all the remainder of the
estate. Witnesses: John J Hazard, George Clark and Joe Clark.

[NI0471] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Will of EBER SHERMAN of North Kingston, RI
(Margins destroyed by fire, Dec. 1870)

God so blest me in this life I give and bequeath the same in the following manner and form first my debts and funerall charges be paid ( ) I give to my beloved Son Eber Sherman one hundred acres of land joyning to the house which jo ( ) to be to him and to his heires lawfully begotten of his own body ( )

Item: I give to my beloved son Samuel Sherman ( ) acres of land joyning and bounding upon my son Eber Shermans land that is above mentioned to be to him and to his heires lawfully begotten of his own body. Item I give to my beloved son Stephen Sherman one hundred acres of land joyning and bounding upon the land given to Samuel Sherman my son that is to say to him and to his heires lawfully begotten of his own body.

Item: I give to my beloved son Elisha Sherman one hundred acres of land joyning and bounding upon the land given to son Stephen Sherman before mentioned to be to him and his lawfully begotten of his own body. Item. I give to my beloved son William Sherman one hundred acres of land adjoyning and bounding upon the land which I have given to my son Elisha Sherman to be to him and to his heires lawfully begotten of his own body. Item. I give to my beloved son Peleg Sherman one hundred and eighty & two acres of land ( ) bounded upon John Sweets land near ( ) to be to him and to his heires lawfully begotten of his own body but in case any of them w( ) entioned shal depart th ( ) I hereby utterly disallow and revoke all other testaments and wills by me formerly any wise named wri( ) ing and confirming this & noe other to be my last will and testament; In witness whereof I have here unto sett my hand and seale the day and year above writen ( ) signed sealed published and declared to be the last will and testament in the presence of the subscribers by Eber Sherman.

Eber (his mark) Sherman Captain Jesse ( his mark) Champlin Peleg Mumford Theophilus Whale Capt. Jeffery Champlin and Peled Mumford both of Kingstowne in the colony of Rhood Island and Providence Plantations did both appear before the Council of Kingstowne the 14th day of ( ) did declear that they did see and hear Eber Sherman of Kingstowne (late deceased) sett his mark and seal upon the the above writen instrument and declared the same to ( ) his last will and testament and that they sett their names thereto as witnesses to the same.

Entered upon record the 13th day November 1706 Samuel ffones Clerke

Inventory Follows Kingstown October the 11th day 1706
Inventory of Eber Shermans Estate late deceased By us Justice Champlin, Jonathan Sherman:
Oxen five cows two three year old olds one calf-- North Kingstown, R.I. Probate Records V. 1-5, pp. 81-82 F.D.S. 603, 604.

When I could not read what the word was I put in ( ).
The above Will can be found in "Some of the Descendants of Philip Sherman, The First Secretary of Rhode Island" by Roy V. Sherman, pp. 26-28.
------------------------------------------------------------ ------------
He was admitted freeman, Tuesday, June 8, 1658, in Portsmouth, RI. He was one of the first settlers in the Narragansett country. "Decb'r. 5, 1679, an acco't of lands laid out & allowed to mr. Sam'll Wilbore & compa. to Jared Bull, and several others", shows 500 acres to Eber Sherman. (Fones Record - 1894. pp36-7) "He was a prominent and influential man, and held many of the local offices." F.D.Sherman lists Abigail as a daughter with a question mark. F.D.S. 602; A letter, Mrs. Thoms O. Treharne, Troy, N. Y.

He settled on the West side of Narragansett Bay at North Kingston.
"Going to Palmyra; Sherman Deeds" by Margaret Sherman Lutzvick, 1977.

[NI0472] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!All information from Sharon K Weaver.

[NI0473] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!Information from Ellen Gayle Layton. She references "The Ancestors and Descendants of Philip Shearman, the first secretary and recorder of the colony of Rhode Island" by Frank Dempster Sherman, 1908. She sent copies of several pages including his will proved Mar 22, 1686/7, recorded on page 260 of "Land Evidence, 2nd Book, No. 1" Town of Portsmouth, R.I.
------------------------------------------------------------ ------------
Will of PHILIP SHEARMAN Of Portsmouth, RI

In the name of God Amen, I, Philip Shearman, yeoman, aged seventy-one years, of the Town of Portsmouth in the colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations in New England, being in good memory, praise be therefor given to Almighty God, do make and ordain this my Last Will and Testament in the manner and form following: (that is to say); first and principally I commend my soul into the hands of Almighty God and my body to the earth to be decently buried by my executor hereafter named. And as for the disposition of my worldly estate, it is in manner and form following; first I give to Sarah my loving wife the use and her dwelling in the first room at the west end of my now dwelling house & bed and bedding with the furniture thereto belonging now standing in the aforenamed room. Also I do here by ordaine and appoint my son Samuel my sole Executor to this my last will and testament truely performed; and to b__ himself, heirs, Executors and Administrators for the true performance hereof; furthermore my will is that my executor shall sufficiently maintain my loving wife with food and raiment and all necessaries whatsoever during her natural life and at her decease decently to bury her; furthermore, I do give unto Sarah mywife ten good ewe sheep to be marked out of my flock for the sole use and dispose both of bodie and wool yearly, wch said number shall be kept by my said Executor during the natural life of Sarah my said wife free and without any charge to my wife.

Item: I do give unto Eber my Eldest son that which I have already given him, ten acres of land in the bounds of Portsmouth aforesaid at a place called Briggs swamp joining to a parcel of land of his own to him and his heirs forever. And all my horse flesh in the Narragansett country except one mare, the scond best; such excepted mare, I give to Thomas Mumford and Peleg Mumford my Grandchildren.

Item: I give unto my son Peleg five ewe sheep.

Item: I give unto my son Edmund a quarter share of meadow and a sixteenth part of a share of upland lying in Ponagansett within the Township of Dartmouth in the colony of New Plymouth in New England with all the privileges th__ to belonging or any wards appertaining. And also my whole right in the purchase of Squamscutt now called Westerly by thecollony to the said Edmund and his heirs.

Item: I give unto my son Samson after the decease of my said wife his half of the breadth of my farm wch I now dwell upon from the westward end to the sea and three Rood more in breadth of the whole length of the aforesaid land and bounded southward upon a straight line Eastward from the south west corner of that orchard now called Sampson's upon a straight line to a lande marke about a rood short of the cart way that goes from my dwelling house to my barn in Portsmouth aforesaid. And from the said land marke upon a sloap line five Rood westwardly of my barn until it comes to the lineof the aforesaid half-breadth of the aforesaid farm to him and his heires forever and to have the third part of any hay and grass yearly of the aforesaid farm. And my son Samson and my son Samuel to have equal privileges in the arible land of the aforesaid farm during the natural life of Sarah my wife.

Item: I give unto my son Samuel all the remaining of my aforesaid farm with my now dwelling house and all the other buildings upon the said part of the land lying southward of the other part of my farm now given to my son Samson as aforesaid to him and his heirs forever after the decease of Sarah my wife and to have two parts of the grass and the hay during the natural life of Sarah my wife.

Item: All my neat cattle, hors kind, sheep kind and swine I do give unto my son Samuel aforenamed Executor, (excepting two oxen and a fatting cow.) And also all my moveable goods (Excepting two great chests with lock and key to each of them, which said chests I give unto my wife Sarah) he my aforesaid executor paying the several legacies herein this my will specified both the aforementioned and what shall hereafter be exprest in this my will.

Item: I givee unto my son Samson aforenamed one white faced mare with her foale and all those four Indians wch we jointly bought.

Item: I give unto my son Samson and my son Samuel my draught horse and two draught steers equally betwixt them.

Item: I give unto my son John my bay mare.

Item: I give unto my son Benjamin all the remaining __art of of my land at Brigg's Swamp whereupon the said Benjamin's house now stands, being by estimation twentie acres be the same more or less to him and his heires forever.

Item: I give unto my daughter Sarah ten ewe sheep to be paid her the year after my decease.

Item: I give unto my daughter Mary ten ewe sheep to be paid her the year after my decease.

Item: I give unto my daughter Hannah fivee pounds of New England silver money for the proper use of her selfe and children to be paid the year after my decease.

Item: I give unto my daughter Hannah five ewe sheep to be paid to her the year after my decease.

Item: I give unto my daughter Philip ten ewe sheep to be paid to her the year after my decease.

Item: I give unto Benjamin Clarke to my son Edmund until he comes of age of one & twenty years, the said Edmund finding the said Benjamin with sufficient food and clothing duting the terme aforesaid.

Item: I the above said Philip Shearman do ordain and appoint this to be my last will and testament, making void all former wills and testaments heretofore by me made.

In witness whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seal this one and thirtyeth day of the month comonly called July, Anno Domino on thousand six hundred and Eightie one.

Philip Shearman (Seal)

Before the signing and sealing of this my will and testament, I the aforesaid Philip Shearman do declare that wheras the word Assigns is omitted in the giving of the several parcels of land to my children: That it is my true intent and meaning that I do give the said several parcels of land specified in my above written will to my children to their heires and Assigns forever.

Signed and sealed in the presence of: Job Almy Philip Phettiplace Elias Williams Proved March 22, 1686/7. Recorded on page 260 of "Land Evidence, 2nd Book, No. 1" Town of Portsmouth, R.IH.E.S. & F.D.S. 48-50

All those words with a blank (ie. ______ ) = words that were not legiable.

The above Will can be found in "Some of the Descendants of Philip Sherman, The First Secretary of Rhode Island" by Roy V. Sherman, pp. 26-28.
------------------------------------------------------------ ------------
From 1633 to 1637 five brothers and cousins immigrated to New England. They are the ancestors of most of the English SHERMAN in the United States. Philip and Samuel were brothers and Capt. John was their cousin. All three of these men were second cousins to The Rev. John and Hon. Samuel, who were also brothers. It is not certain if William was also related.

Philip Shearman 1609-1687, came to Roxbury, MA, in 1633. Samuel (Hon.) Sherman 1618-1700, came to Fairfield, CT, in 1634.John (Rev.) Sherman 1613-1685, came to Watertown, MA, in 1634.Samuel Shearman 1601-1643, came to Boston, MA, in 1636.John (Capt.) Sherman 1612-1690, came to Watertown, MA, in 1637.William Sherman "The Pilgrim" 1612-1679, came to Plymouth, MA, in 1632.
--Information from Roy V. Sherman, Professor Emeritus, Akron, OH Some of the Descendants of Philip Sherman the First Secretary of Rhode Island
------------------------------------------------------------ ------------
The History of the State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations: Biographical, by the American Historical Society, Inc., 1920. For an unknown reason there are two copies of the book with the same title page, but with different contents. From pages 254-57 of one edition.

ALBERT KEENE SHERMAN - In the important occupation of the "shearman," or cloth-shearer, is found the origin of the surname Sherman. The Shear-men, those who sheared the nap and dressed the cloth, formed a company in the York Guild. These guilds were all powerful in the mercantile fields in 'the centuries in which they flourished, and membership in them was highly prized. It was therefore natural that John, the Shearman, should, when the custom of using surnames obtained a practically universal vogue, adopt the name of his calling as his surname - wherefore we have the name in its present form, Sherman.

The Sherman family, in the period when the name had become hereditary, rose to a position of great importance and influence in England, and, supplied many noted men to the nation. The Shermans of Yaxley, of whom the American Shermans whose ancestry is traced through Philip Sherman, are descendants, were an honored and respected family there in the early years of the fifteenth century. The Sherman coat-of-arms is as follows:

Arms - Or, a lion rampant sable between three oak leaves vert. Crest - A sea-lion sejant sable, charged on the shoulder with three bezants, two and one. Motto - Mortem Vince Virtute.

The progeny of Philip Sherman in America has numbered many noted men. The Rhode Island branch, of which the late Albert Keene Sherman, of Newport, R. I., was a member, has had such distinguished representatives as the Hon. Sylvester G. Sherman, lawyer, Representative, Speaker of the House, and a justice of the Supreme Court; Major-General Thomas W. Sherman, United States Army, and Hon. Robert Sherman, for many years a journalist of note in New England, and a former United States Marshal for the district of Rhode Island.

(The Family in New England).

(I) Hon. Philip Sherman, immigrant ancestor and progenitor, was the seventh child of Samuel and Philippa (Ward) Sherman, and was born February 1610, in Dedham, England. He came to America when twenty-three years old and settled in Roxbury, Mass., where he was made freeman, May 14, 1634, standing next on the list after Governor Haynes. In 1635 he returned to England for a short time, but was again in Roxbury, November 20, 1637, when he and others were warned to give up all arms, because "the opinions and revelations of Mr. Wheelwright and Mrs. Hutchinson have seduced and led into dangerous errors many of the people here in New England." The church record says that he was brought over to "Familism" by Porter, his wife's stepfather.

In 1636 he was one of the purchasers on the island of Aquidneck, new Rhode Island, and on the formation of a government there in 1639 became secretary under Governor William Coddington. The Massachusetts authorities evidently believed that he was still under their jurisdiction, for on March 12, 1638, though he had summons to appear at the next court, "if they had not yet gone to answer such things as shall be objected." He did not answer this summons, but remained in Rhode Island, where he continued to be a prominent figure in the affairs of the colony.

He was made freeman, March 16, 1641, was general recorder, 1648 to 1652, and deputy from 1665 to 1667. He, was among the sixteen persons who were requested, on April 4, 1676, to be present at the next meeting of the deputies to give advice and help in regard to the Narragansett campaign. He was public-spirited and enterprising. After his removal to Rhode Island he left the Congregational church and united with the Society of Friends. Tradition affirms that he was "a devout but determined man." The early records prepared by him still remain in Portsmouth, and show him to have been a very neat and expert penman, as well as an educated man. His will showed that he was wealthy for the times.

In 1634 he married Sarah Odding, stepdaughter of John Porter, of Roxbury, and his wife Margaret, who was the Widow Odding at the time of her marriage to Porter. From Philip Sherman the line runs through six generations to Albert Keene Sherman, of Newport.
********
"The Ancestors and Descendants of Philip Shearman, the first secretary and recorder of the colony of Rhode Island" by Frank Dempster Sherman, 1908

"Philip Sherman came to Roxbury, 1633, a single man; freeman May 14, 1634, first on the list after Gov. Haynes; married Sarah Odding daughter of John Porter's wife by a former husband; went home early but soon came again and was led away, says the church record, to familism and by Porter; disarmed, Nov. 1637, and banished next year; went to Rhode Island; there signed the compact of civil government, Mar. 1638; was Secretary or Recorder of the Colony, 1638, and representative, 1656," Savage. F.D.S. 42

SERVICES of HON. PHILIP SHERMAN, of PORTSMOUTH in the COL. of RHODE ISLAND
Time of King Philip's War: "At the General Assembly of the Collony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, held at Newport, April the 4th 1676, it was voted that in these troublesome times and straites in this Collony, this Assembly desiringe to have the advice and consurrance of the most juditious inhabitants, if it may had for the good of the whole, doe desire at their next sittinge the company and council of Mr. Benedict Arnold, Mr. John Clarke, Mr. James Barker, Mr. Obadiah Holmes, Mr. William Vaughan, Mr. William Elscocks, Mr. Christopher Holder, Mr. Phillip Shearman, Capt'n John Albro, Mr. William Wodell, Mr. George Lawton, Mr. Robert Hodgson, Mr. William Carpenter, Mr. Gregory Dexler, Capt. Randall Houldon and Capt. John Greene; and the General Sargeant to inform the severall persons the Assembly's desire herein. F.D.S. 45

June 1649. "Chose Towne Clerke for this next yeare insewinge" Chosen every year up to 1656, inclusive.
June 1656. "Towne Magistrate"
May 16, 1651. "Ordered that Philip Shearman shall have 5 pounds for five years service of his Clarkeship." Also ordered that 15s. is due Philip Shearman from the Towne for writing out the General Court Orders for the Towne.
1656 to 1673. Every year. Member of the "Towne Council".
Apr. 23, 1679. Tax Assessor.
Apr. 4, 1683. Chosen to lay out a highway.
Oct. 12, 1684. Member of the Committee of Ajudication.
Apr. 1, 1685 and Apr. 9, 1686. Chosen the same again.
Original Records, Portsmouth, R.I. F.D.S. 46
*******
"Going to Palmyra; Sherman Deeds" by Margaret Sherman Lutzvick, 1977.
Philip Shearman was twenty-three years old when he first arrived on American colonial soil. According to information gleaned from many sources, Philip Shearman first came from England to the American colonies in 1633. He first settled in Roxbury, MA and later became instrumental in forming the Rhode Island government. In 1633 he married Sarah Odding, daughter of John Porter's wife by a previous marriage. According to Roy V. Sherman,
"Philip Sherman came into the land in 1633 a single man and afterward married Sarah Odding, a daughter of the wife of John Porter by a former husband. This man was of a melancholy temper. He lived honestly and confortably among us several years. Quoted from Rev. John Eliot's records of the 1st Church of Roxbury. Drake's 'Town of Roxbury' p. 300
But before he had settled peacefully in RI he had gotten himself into much trouble in MA.
As noted, the English settlers originally came to the northeast colonies to, among other things, ensure religious freedoms not allowed in England. And while Philip lived in MA he became involved with the religious beliefs and teachings of William and Anne Hutchinson. The Hutchinsons ardently believed and taught that salvation was realized through God's grace and not by man's works. Anne Hutchinson, who arrived in MA in 1634, intensely preached this doctrine, and many immigrants begam to follow her ideals. Of course, this became a sore spot with traditional puritans who considered this an outright attack on their more inflexible moral and legal beliefs. Indeed, even the government of MA believed her teachings to be offensive and got involved in the dispute. The result was a rift between those who believed and followed her and those who did not. Finally, it became a political issue when one of her most loyal supporters, the Governor Sir Henry Vane, lost his Governship because he supported her teachings. After his loss many of her followers, fearing similar retribution, deserted her.
In 1637 Anne Hutchinson was tried in legal court on a charge of seducing ministers into following her religious thought. The trial never really gave her a chance, of course, because more politically powerful people had their own agenda. Not only was she preaching blasphemous religious beliefs, but she was also a woman. And in those times women had not right to speak out with political, religious, or any other kinds of opinions. She was found guilty of the charges and excommunicated from the colony of MA. But she left many ardent sympathizers behind.
Those who remained supportive of the belief of grace over works included such people as Rev. John Clarke, William Coddington, John Porter, Mr. Wheelright, John Coggeshall, Henry Pull, John Sanford, Mr. Stratton, Philip Shearman, and others. They became known as the Roxbury Men. (RVS) And they too were all banished from the colony of MA, and ordered to disarm. The order to disarm was dated November 20, 1637 as follows:
Order to Disarm, 20 Nov. 1637. "Whereas the opinions and revelations of Mr. Wheelwright and Mrs. Hutchinson have seduced and led into dangerous errors many of the people here in New England, insomuch as there is just cause of suspition that they, as others in Germany in former times, may upon some revelations make suddaine irruption upon those that differ from them in judgment, for prevention whereof it is ordered" Drake's 'Town of Roxbury' 1878 p. 292
It is interesting to note that Philip's own step father-in-law, John Porter, was the one who got him into all of his trouble in the first place. It is said that Philip made a trip home to England, and when he returned to New England he seemed different. He had begun to follow Porter's religious ideals. Philip was said to have been,
" Upon a just calling he went for England & returned again with a blessing. But after his father in law John Porter, was so carryd away with the opinions of familism [Going back to when the Church had precedence over individual interests or rights] and scism [Split] he followed them and removed with them to (Rhode) Island. He behaved himself sinfully in these matters (as may appear in the story) and was cast out of the church." Quoted from Rev. John Eliot's records of the 1st Church of Roxbury. Drake's 'Town of Roxbury' p. 300
RVS goes not to say,
"Among Roxbury men disarmed was Philip Sherman" Ibid. 292 "Of the three citizens of Roxbury driven hence at this time two, John Coggeshall and Henry Pull, were afterwards governors of Rhode Island; while a third, Philip Sherman, became a distinguished citizen and founder of that colony." Drake's 'Town of Roxbury' 1878 p. 292 F.D.S. 43
The group banished from the Bay Colony consulted with Roger Williams at Providence. He advised them to purchase the island of Aquidnech in the Narragansett Bay. This they did obtaining title from Caunonicus and Mianantoma, Sachem who had command of Narragansett and Aquidneck Island, July 1, 1639. Chapin, Howard M. Documentary History of Rhode Island V. 2, p. 26. For fuller treatment see: Stratton, B. L. Sherman and Allied Families.
The articles of incorporation of the group led by Wm. Coddington and who purchased the island of Aquidneck read as follows: "We whose names are under written do here solemnly, in the presence of Jehovah, incorporate ourselves into a Bodie Politick, and as He shall help, will submit our persons, lives and estates unto our Lord Jesus Christ, the King of Kings, and Lord of Lords, and to all those perfect and most absolute laws of His given in His Holy word of Truth, to be guided and judged thereby." Signed March 7, 1638y the following:
Wm. Coddington, Thomas Savage, John Clarke, Wm. Dyer, Wm. Hutchinson, J., Wm. Freeborne, John Coggeshal, Phillip Shearman, Wm. Aspinwal, John Walker, Samuel Wilbore, Richard Carder, John Porte, Wm. Paulston, John Sanford, Edward Hutchinson. Senr., Edward Hutchinson Junr. Esq., Henry Pulle, Randall Howldon F.D.S. 44 B. L. Stratton Sherman and Allied Families p. 60
Anne Hutchingson initially moved with her family to Aquidneck Island in RI where she lived for a time. Later, after her husband's death, she moved to Pelham Bay that is now known as the Bronx, NY. She died there in August of 1643 when she and almost of her family were killed in an Indian Massacre.

[NI0474] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!All information from Sharon K Weaver.

[NI0475] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Donna is not aware of any kids. Oliver's obituary says she was living in Tulsa Oklahoma in 1955.

Mom says she lived with Buford James (BJ) Rogers for 20 years. He was married and his wife would not give him a divorce. He later went back to his wife. Found a Buford Rogers born 2 Feb 1915, died Dec 1978 in Dallas, TX. SS#462-05-5559

Death certificate #37184

[NI0476] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!Information from Ellen Gayle Layton. She references "The Ancestors
and Descendants of Philip Shearman, the first secretary and recorder
of the colony of Rhode Island" by Frank Dempster Sherman, 1908. She
sent copies of several pages.

[NI0480] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Will of SAMUEL SHERMAN Of Dedham and Ardley, County Essex, ENGLAND

In the name of God Amen the 20th daye of January anno domini, 1615, I Samuel Sherman of Ardley, Co. Essex, yeoman sick in body but in good and perfecte remembrance thanks I give to God for the same, doe make and ordaine this my testament containing my last will in manner and form following:

First and principallie, I give & bequeath my soule into the handes of god almithtie my maker & to Jesus Chtiste, my most mercifull redeemer hopin assuredly to have pardon & remission of all my sins through his death & bludshedding & to enjoye a joyfull resurrection. And my body to be buried where it please God to call.

And touching that earthly substance wch it hath pleased god to bestowe on me, I doe will & devise in manner folllowinge, that is to say:

I doe give & devise unto Philipp my well beloved wife all my landes, tenements, houses, edifices, buildings, yard Orchards, gardens wth the appurtenances whatsoever, both fr__ copy or customary sette, lying & being within the parishe of Dedham, in the countie of Essex, or elsewhere, to have & to holde to her the said Philipp & her assigns for & during her natural life, for such endes & purposes as are here after expressed in this my will.

Item, I give & devise to Henry, my sonne all that my coppieholde or customary messuage called Hardinges in Dedham afforesaide wth the houses & barnes, yards, orchards, & gardens where Thomas Cole now dweleth, together wth twoe acres of lande gelonging & neere adjoining unto the same mesuages lying on the northe side thereof & twoe fields, parcel of the sayde tenement, Hardings, one of them lying next the heath caled Dedham Heath containing by estimation foure acr__ and the other lying betwene the last recited fields & a close or fielde called Poppes fielde containing likewise by estimation foure acres more or lesse to have & to hold the saide messuage, landes & buildings & other premisses wt_ their appurtenances with the parcells of lande above devise to the saydeHenry, my sonne, to the sayde Henrye & his heirs for ever from & after the decease of the said Philipp, my wife.

I give and bequeath unto Phillipp, my sonne, and to Samuel my sonne after the decease of my sayde wife, all that messuage or dwelling house wch was sometyme John Wrenches when I late dwell in Dedham afforesaide wth all the houses edi__ces & buildings, yardes & gardens, barnes, & outhouses wth their appurts to have and to hold to them the sayde Phillipp & Samuel, their heyres & assigns, for ever.

I doe further give unto the sayde Samuel, my sonne, all that orchard lying at the estate end of the barn there wth one close called Poppes field containing by estimation four acres parcell of the lande late John Wrenches & one close called Bushie field, parcell of the tenement Hardings lying adjoyning to the nether end of the sayde Popes fielde and seven roodes of medow lying and being in a place in Dedham called Coxepittes to have & to hold to him the sayde Samuel & his heyres for ever after the decease of said Philipp my wife.

I givee & devise unto my sonne Phillipp, five closes of lande lying together nere the sayde messuage as they are in the tenure & occupation of one Lionel Cheute or his assigne contayning by estimation eight acres more or lesse, parcell likewise of the sayde landes late John Wrenches to have & to hold to him & his heyres for ever, after the decease of the sayde Philipp, my wife. Provided alwayss that if it happen eyther of my sonnes Samuel & Phillipp to depart this life before he shall accomplishe the age of XXII years and wth oute issue of his body lawfully begotten, then I will that the sayde Henry, my sonne shall have & hold to him & his heyres for ever, after the decease of the sayde Philipp my wife those landes, tenements & hereditamentes wch were late the mayde John Wrenches together wth the close called Popes fields & also the sayde acre & three roads of meadow lying in Coxepittd aforesayde. And then I give & demise to the survivor of the sayde Samuel & Phillip my sonnes & his heyres for ever all those lands, tenements & hereditaments wth theyre appurtces before mentioned called Hardings aforesayde unto the sayde Samuell, my sonne & his heyres for ever as he should have had the same if he had survived his brother Phillip. And then I will also that the sayde Phillip, my sonne shall have all those landes, tenements & hereditaments to him & his heyres wch were some time John Wrenches afforesaide, as th sayde Henrye should have had & enjoyed the same if the said Samuel or Phillip had departed this life & the sayde Henrye had survived.

I will & bequeath to Mary & Martha, my daughters to eyther of them the sum of XL4i of lawful English moneye, when they shall accomplish their ages of XXI yeres.

And I will & bequeathe further unto the sayde Philipp my wife, all those my goodes & cattalls, householde stuffe moveable & unmoveable, corn, cattell, money, plate & leases whatsoever the better to enable her (wth the profit of the sayde landes & tenements beforementioned) to paye my debtes my legaceys & to bring up my my sayde children in good & decent manner. But if it should happen the sayde Philipp my wife to departe this life before all the sayde children shall accomplishe the full age of XXII yeres, that then I will my other executor mentioned in this will shall enter upon all suche landes, tenements & hereditaments as those children should have & enjoye (by virtue of this my will) whiche at the tyme of the decease of the sayde Philipp my wife have not accomplished theyree sayde ages of XXII yeres. And my sayde other executor to hold & enjoye the same & take the issues & profits of them & every of them until they, my children shall severally come to their sayde ages of XXII years for the better performance of this my will & bringing up of so many of my sayde children, as shall be then under the sayde age of XXII yeres.

And of this my presente last will & testament I make and ordeyne the sayde Philipp my wife & John __peheire of Dedham, my brother in lawe, my executors, whom I desire to see this my will performed in all thinges as I have reposed my trust in them.

I give to the poor of Ardley XVs.

Item, to Mr. John Rogers, of Dedham XXs. to be payde & delivered to them by my executors wth in convenient time after my decease.

In witnes whereof hereunto I have sett my hande & seale & do publishe this for my last will & testamente, revoking all former wills whatsoever in the presence of us-- Rob't W-rde, Henry Sharman, John Ward, Ezeckiel Sherma, George Fudson.

I do also appoynte my wellbeloved friend, Nathaniel Hecksor, of Ardley, yeoman, overseer of this my will and testamente.

(signed) Samuel Sherman his mark


(Seal: Asea lion sitting) Dated January 20, 1615: proved, March 2, 1615. Arch. Colchester, 1585-1614, Cooke, 31. F.D.S. 36-38
------------------------------------------------------------ ------------

All those words with a blank (ie. ______ ) = words that were not legiable.

The above Will can be found in "Some of the Descendants of Philip Sherman, The First Secretary of Rhode Island" by Roy V. Sherman, pp. 19-22.

*****
Samuel Sherman married Phillipa Ward, and was a clothier in Ardleigh, Essex County, England. On October 2, 1599 Samuel received from his father, Henry, and George Cole a three acre parcel of land called Peppers Field. Samuel Sherman's sons, Samuel Jr. and Philip came to New England in the early 1630s.
"Going to Palmyra; Sherman Deeds" by Margaret Sherman Lutzvick, 1997

[NI0481] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!All information from Sharon K Weaver.

[NI0484] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!All information from Sharon K Weaver.

Will of HENRY SHERMAN of Dedham, County Essex, ENGLAND

In the name of God, Amen, the one and twentieth day of August in the yeare of our Lord God one thousand six hundred and tenne, I Henry Sherman and elder of Dedham in the County of Essex, Cloothier, being in good remembrance (the Lord be praysed) do make and ordaine this my last Will and Testament in manner and form as followeth; first I give and bequeath my soule unto Almighty God who infused it into my mortal and corrupt body and hath washed and purged it from all the defilements of sinne orignall and actual with the whole punishment therefore due unto me in and by the precious Blood of my Lord and Saviour Jesus Christ, and my body to be buried at the discretion of myne Executor.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Susan my wife all that my house wherein I now dwell and the land with the Oadhouse and all the appurtenances thereunto now belonging holding of the Manner of Dedham Hall by estimate 20 acres more or less which I had the surrender of my father, I give them to her during her natural life, and my will and meaning is that my wife shall keep the said houses in good lawful and sufficient reparacons as conveniently as she may during all her said terme and that she make no strippe nor waste upon the pmises and that she leave at the end of her terme in the dwellinghouse the pannes and leads and in the Oadhouse the leads to them and to eyther of them fastened and belonging and yff my sd wife shall not keep the sd houses in reepacons as aforesd and shall make strippe and waste upon the sd houses and lands at any tyme above and beyond the valewe of 20s, then my will and meaning is that my son Henry Shearman shall enter upon said houses and lands within two monthes after such edfault made and then and from thenceforth shall pay during her life to the sd Susan yearly the full summe of L16 of lawful money of England at four several times and quarters of the year the accompt for the year and every quarter thereof being made for the first day of the sd Henry Shearman his entrance into and upon the prmses as aforesd and that by even and equal porcons the whole sum being divided into 4 parts. Provided that at the full end of every quarter also the sd Henry (or his assigns) shall bring the sd money as aforesd to the then dwelling house of the sd Susan and for everie default thereof whensoever it shall happen to bee shall forfeite to the sd Susan 20s.

Item: After my wives decease I give and bequeath all the aforesaid houses and land with their appurtenances with my two taynters unto my son Henry Shearman and his heirs forever.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Henry Shearman my sonne the joyned bedstead and the bed on it as it now standeth in the guest chamber and the cubboards in the same chamber and the long table in the Hall with the six jonyed stooles, to have them after my wife's decease and until then my will and mind is that my wife shall have the use and occupancy of them and after to leave them in ye house to my sonne Henry as aforesd bequeathed and to his heirs.

Item: I give to Susan my wife six of the best of my silver spoones and to Henry my son six other silver spoones of the best next to them before to my wife bequeathed.

Item: I give and bequeath to Susan my wife the summe of three score pounds in lawful English money.

Item: I give more to Susan my wife my tapestrie coverlett, my best silver salt, 8 of my best milch kine, the bedstead in the parlor on which I used to lye with the beds on it and all things thereunto belonging with the cubboard in the same parlour and 2 chest in the same place, the one a Danske chest and the other a joyned chest with a little cofer 2 needlewroought cushions in the hall and one silver cup.

Item: I give and bequeath to my sd wife fower seames of rye that is to say 2 seames presently after my death to be delivered and 2 seems more within fower monthes after both by myne Executors.

Item: My will and meaning is that my wife shall have perceivee and take everie yeare during her life six loads of wood in and upon the lands at this time to me belonging and in my occupacon-- Provided that she taketh indifferently upon one part as upon another to whomsoever bequeathed and as the wood shall be of most fitt growth for that purpose with ingrease and eggresse into all and every parcel of sd lands to fell and carrie the sd six loads of wood as afore bequeathed; also I give unto Susan my wife halfe my hoggs with the halfe of all my household stuffe whatsoever before unbequeathed as halfe of the linnen and draperie, halfe of the brasse pewter and dayrie vessells brewing vessels and other things fitt and needful for house keeping. All the residue of household stuffe and cattells not bequeathed my mynde and will is shalbe equally divided among all my children.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Nathaniel Shearman my sonne the house wherein now William King now dwelleth with the lands thereto belonging called Scotts by estimation 5 acres more or less with the appurtenances to him and his heirs forever upon condicon that he shall pay unto my son Daniel Shearman or his heires the sum of L10 or lawful English money within 2 yeares after my decease.

Item: I give unto Nathaniel Sherman my sonne my broad loome which is now in the occupation of John Orvis of Lawford with the furniture thereto belonging.

Item: I give and bequeath unto John Shearman and Ezekiel Shearman my sonnes all those my lands which were late Doctor Shearman's called the Heckells and Goldings Acres to bee equally divided betwixt them by myne Executors, to them and to their heires forever.

Item: I give and bequeath unto John Shearman my sonne one field called Waylands by estimate seven acres more or lesse to him and his heires forever.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Ezekiel Shearman my sonne 3 acres of meadow lying in broad Meddowe holding of the Manor of Dedham Hall and 3 roads of meddowe holding in the Manors of Over Hall and Neather Hall of Dedham to him and his heires forever.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Edmond Shearman my sonne all my lands holding of Faytes and Wades called by the name of Garlicke feild and Ardley lands and Boremans acre or any other name to him and his heires forever. Provided that my futher mynde and will is concerning all and the severall lands to my sonnes John, Ezeckiel, and Edmund aforesaid bequeathed that if theis my three sonnes John, Ezekiel, and Edmund or anie of them shall lett sett over or sell their lands to them given as aforesaid that then they and every one of them shall lett sett over and sell their lands to them given as aforesd to Henry Shearman my sonne if he will at a reasonable rate and price as shall be thought by two men chosen by my cousin Edmund Galloway. Put and yff they or any of them shall otherwise than according to this my meaning will lett sett over to sell the lands aforesd, then my full will and mind is that they and everie one of them making default contrary to my will in this case shall pay unto my son Henry Shearman L5 of lawful English money everie one so offending L5 for himself as a legasie to the sd Henry by me given out of tho__ lands. And the sd legacies by them and everie of them to be paid as aforesd within one weeke after the letting and setting over or selling the sd lands contrary to this my will.

Item: My minde and will is that my 3 sonnes John Shearman, Ezekiel Shearman, and Edmund Shearman shall enter upon and enjoy their lands given them as aforesd pntly after my decease.

Item: My mind and will is that my 8 acres of land in the Hall field shall be sold within 2 years after my decease to the best advantage and the money received of the same and disposed as followeth.

Item: I first give to thereof unto Henry Fenne son of Simon Fenne L5 of lawful English money. All the residue of the money which shall remaine of the sale of the land I give equally to be divided amongst my childrens children to be paid within 4 months after the sale of the sd land. And the sd legacies so given unto the sd children to be paid unto their parents in lawful English money the sd parents laying security to my Executor for their discharge.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Mr. Rogers Preacher of Dedham the summe of L8 of lawful English money to be paid him by myne Executor within 4 years after my decease, that __ to say 40 shillings a year for 4 years.

Item: I give and bequeath to the increasing of the po___ stocke of the towne of Dedham 40 shillings of lawful English money to be paid by my Executor.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Henry Shearman my sonne my woods lying in Ardley that I bought of William Baldwin to him and his heires forever. Condiconally that my sd son Henry Shearman pay or cause to be paid unto my sonne Daniel Shearman or to his heires ye sum of L12 of Lawful English money within 6 months after my decease, and also 20s of like lawful English money to be paid by my son henry Shearman to Phebe Fenn my daughter within 6 months after my decease.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Daniel Shearman my sonne the sum of L20 of lawful English money to be paid by myne Executor within 6 months after my decease to him and to his heirs, the sd L20 as also the above bequeathed L12 to be paid him upon condition that he shall decharge my Executor of the sum of 5 and 20 pounds which he received to use of me and my son in law Symon Fenne deceased for which we stand bound to Mr. Boads as also that he discharge myne Executor of other L20 for which I stand bound with him.

Item: I give unto my daughters in law to each of them 10s. to be paid by my Executor.

Item: I give unto Anaa Pettifeild of William Pettifeild 40s of lawful English money to be paid by my Executor within one year after my decease.

Item: My will and mind is that my Executor shall pay unto Anne Shearman my Brother Doctor Shearman's daughter L5 of lawful English money which was the gift of her Grandfather and in discharge thereof at her full age of two and twenty years, it was once before paid unto her father's hands yet fearing that she would be voyd of it for want of provision of his part I will that it be paid as aforesaid.

Item: I give unto Mr. Dowse of Stratford 10s; to Mr. Richard Ravens Parson of Wattfeild Xs; to Mr. Sage Curate of Dedham XXs; to Calvin Humphrey son of Mr. Humphrey Scholemayster of Dedham Xs; and to Gilbert Hills my brother in law Xs; all the sd five legacies to be paid within six months after my decease.

Item: I give unto my brother Lawrence of Esthorpe my best cloake.

Item I give unto James Hasset the elder of Dedham 6s. 8d. within 3 months after my decease.

Item: My will and meaning is that my two sons Henry and Samuel Shearman shall sell my 8 acres of land in the Hallfeild to the best advantage of my Children's children as afore bequeathed within 2 years after my decease, and my meaning is that the mayne profit which shall arise of the sd land during the sd 2 years shall be paid by them to my sd son Daniel and his heirs.

Item: My will and meaning is that the residue of all my goods unbequeathed; my debts and legacies being paid and my funeral charges being answerede both corne cattells and money and all other things whatsoever shalbe equally divided betwixt my children.

Item: My will and meaning is that George Cole the elder William Cole, Edmund Shearman and John Pye shall indifferently divide my goods unbequeathed betwixt by children.

Item: I do ordaine and make Susan my wife my sole Exectrix to see this my last Will and Testament performed, and I give unto her that part of the lease of the Rayes. Revoking all other wills formerly by me made, and futher I appoint my cousen Edmund Galloway Clerke the supervisor of this my will requiring his helpe in any controversie that any wais by occasion of this my last will and testament may arise betwixt my children or anie of them, and for his payne_ I will that he shall have 20s. of lawful English money to be paid by myne Executrix within one year after my decease. In wittnes whereof to these two sheetes of paper contayning my last will I have sett my hande and seale the day and yeare above written.

Henry Shearman

In the presence of John Pye and Henry Young and Thomas Guyan and marke of Henry young.

Probatum fuit spud Colchester etc Thomas Edwards, Octavo die mensis Sept. 1610, per Geo. Cole Susan rel decd. def et Exduodecimo die Sept 1610 apud Chelmsford- ad Henry Shearman filius. consistory Register 34 Hamer F.D.S. 32
------------------------------------------------------------ ------------

All those words with a blank (ie. ______ ) = words that were not legiable.

The above Will can be found in "Some of the Descendants of Philip Sherman, The First Secretary of Rhode Island" by Roy V. Sherman, pp. 14-18.

[NI0485] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!All information from Sharon K Weaver.

Will of SUSAN SHERMAN, Widow of HENRY SHERMAN of Dedham, Essex, ENGLAND.

In the name of God Amen, the XXXI August, 1610, I Susan Shearman of Dedham in the County of Essex, who being sick of body but of good and perfect memory (God be thanked) do make this my last Will and Testament in manner and forme as followeth first I bequeath my soul into the hands of God that gave it and my body to be bestowed in Christian burial.

Item: I give unto Henry Shearman my son my silver and gilt salt and my best tapestry coveringe.

Item: I give unto Samuel Sherman my son my six silver spoons which my husband gave to me marked E and S.

Item: I give more unto Samuel Shearman my sonne my feather bed in the parlor with the bolster a paire of blankets and a covering.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Daniel Shearman my sonne the summe of L20 of lawful English money to be paid within three months after my decease.

Item: I give and bequeath more unto my son Daniel Shearman foure of my 8 beasts which my husband gave me and are marked out for my use.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Nathaniel Shearman my sonne the sum of L20 of lawful English money to be paid within 6 months after my decease.

Item: I give unto John Shearman my son my cubbord standing in ye parlour.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Ezekiel Shearman my sonne the summe of L10 of lawful English money to be paid him within 6 months after my decease.

Item: I give anf bequeath unto Ezekiel my sonne my new silver cup.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Edmund Shearman my sonne the sum of L10 of lawful English money to be paid him within one moneth after my decease.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Edmund my son my bedstead in the parlour the flocke bed upon it and the flocke bolster and the yellowe rugg.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Phebe Fenne my daughter one cow my least silver cup and one of my needlework cushions.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Anne Whitting my daughter two beasts, one needlework cushion and my Danske cheste in ye parlour.

Item: I give unto my son Daniel's wief my best gowne.

Item: I give unto my son Nathaniel's weif my Danske chest which standeth in the guest chamber.

Item: I give unto Robert Salmon's son my great grandchild one cowe.

Item: I give unto Mary Shearman my sonne Samuel's daughter my joyned chest in the parlour.

Item: I give unto Susan Shearman my son Daniel's daughter my leaved table in the parlour.

Item: I give unto my Brother Gilbert Hilles the sum of 10s.

Item: I give and bequeath unto Mr. Rogers my black mare.

Item: I give unto Susan Galloway daughter of cosin Edmund Galloway my best violet petticoat. All the residue of my goods unbequeathed shall be equally divided amongst all my children.

Item: I ordain and make my son Henry Shearman my sole Executor to see this my last Will and Testament faithfully performed, and for his paines I give him the lease of the Rayes given me by my husband.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hande and seale the day and year above written.

The mark of
Susan Shearman

In the presence of : Edmund Galloway John Pye

Probatum fuit apud Chelmsford before Thomas Edwards, Sept. 12, 1610.

Henry Shearman, Executor Consistory Court of London Pook Hamer (no. 7) Leaf 13 F.D.S 33, 34
------------------------------------------------------------ ------------

The above Will can be found in "Some of the Descendants of Philip Sherman, The First Secretary of Rhode Island" by Roy V. Sherman, pp. 18, 19.

[NI0486] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!All information from Sharon K Weaver.

Will of THOMAS SHERMAN of Yaxley, County Suffolk, ENGLAND

In the name of God Amen. The XXth daye of January in the yere of our Lord God 1 Thousand fyve hundreth and fyftie and in the fourth yere of the reign of our sovereigne Lorde King Edward the Sixt. I Thomas Sherman of Yaxlee in the Co. of Suffolk and in the diocese of Norwiche being in good Mynde and perfyttremembrance make this my testament and last will in manner and form hereafteer following.

First I bequeath my soule to Almightye God and to all the holy company in heaven.

My bodye to be buryed in the churche of Yaxlee aforesaid yf it shall please God that I shall departe in the towne of Yaxlee aforesaid or els in suche place where yt shall please God to call me.

Item. I give to the high aulter of the seyd churche for my tithes forgotten or to letill paid three shillings, four pence.

Also I bequeathe and will have delt and gevyn to the poor people within the Towne of Yaxle six shillings eight pence.

Also to the poor people within the towne of Eye ten Shillings.

Also to the poor people of the towne of Thrandeston Burgate Diss and Roydon three shillings four pence.

Also I bequeath to Jane my wief my messuages wherein I dwel with all other messuages, lands, tenements, meadows, pastures, woodes, weyes and herditaments in Yaxlee and Eye aforesaid, lying and being on the Est syde of the wey leding from Norwich to Ham (Horham) for the terme of her life of the wynche close the same my sister ys nowe in possession.

And also excent and reserved at the said messuage wherein I do now dwell, the olde parlour, the chamber on the said parlour, the solder over the hall, and the Chamber next the hall dore, the byrne next the mill house, space for fowre horse in the stabyll, the soler over the stabyll and libertie in the bakehouse to bake and brewe, which I will Thomas my sonne have to hym and his heyres and assignes with free Lybertie ingate and outgate in and to all the said houses and other premises before excepted, reservyd at all tyme and tymes my said weif paying the rent to the lordes of the fee, that is to say, to the Kinges grace for the manner of Eye hall by yere sisteen shillings, and to the said manner for "two henys and a cok" by yere five pence.

And to Mr. Anthony Yaxlee for five acres of lande called fulburys by yere three shillings four pence.

Also I give and bequeath to Jane my wief tenne combes of wheate twentie combes of malte, eighte Keyne, fiftie shepe foure horsse at her chose, and one half of all my swyn and pultery.

Also I will that Jane my wief shall have the use and occupieing of my two bedsteds and beddes now standing and being upon the newe chamber with the coveryings and all other things to the said bedds belonging with a cobord and seles (shelves) on the said chamber (for the) terme of her lyfe and after her decease to remayne to Thomas my son and to his assigns.

And if it fortune my wief to marry agayne, then I will Thomas my sonne to enter and have the said chamber beddes and all other things on the said chamber to her bequeathed.

Also I bequeath to Thomas my sonne my counter table, and the two bedsteds and beddes now standing and being in the olde parlour with two other of my best coverings, and all other things to ye said beddes and bedsteds belonging.

Also I bequeath to Jane my wief a sylver pace weying eight ounces and a half and half a quarter, twelve sylver spones weying eighteen ounces, a sylver salte weying eight ounces, as long as she shall kepe herself sole and unmarried. And if it fortune her to marry, to reemayne to Thomas my sonne and his assigns; and as long as she shall kepe herself sole and unmarried then after decease to remayne to the said Thomas.

Also I bequeath to Jane my wief the one half of all my stuf of household before not bequeathed. And the other half I give to Thomas my sonne he paying to eache of his brethren twentie shillings when they shall come to the age of 21 yeres.

Also I bequeath to Thomas my sonne one Goblet weying fourteen ounces and odd. And a sylver salte parcell gilt, and three sylver spones and to each of my children a slyver spone.

Also I bequeath to Thomas my sonne one of my geldings and foure other of my horse and coltes at his election after his mother hath chosen.

Also I bequeath to Richard my sonne twentie marks over and beside all such monye as I have given hym/or lent him which is this ty.

Also I bequeath to John my sonne fourtie pounds.

Also I bequeath to Henry my sonne fourtie pounds to be paide to hym when he cometh out of his prentyshode.

Also I bequeathe to William my sonne fourtie pounds to be payed like as to Henry.

Also I bequeathe to Anthony my sonne fourtie pounds to be paide when he cometh to the age of twenty two years.

And if it shall appere to myne executores at the said tweenty two years that yt shalbe more for the profyt of the said Anthony to have an annuitie of fourtie shillings by yere, than to have the fourtie pounds, then I will Thomas my sonne to have the said forty pounds and to make the said Anthony a good sure and suffficient annuitie of forty shillings yerely, going out of my landes sumetyme Wrenys lying in Yaxlee aforesaid payable at two terms in the yere by even pencions for term of lyfe of the said Anthony.

Also I give and bequeathe to Frounces my sonne and to his heyres, my east landes meadows pastures and hereditaments lying in Dysse in Co. Norfolk, which I late bought of John Waren of Disse.

And also that all my lands pastures hereditaments with appurts luying in Bresseworth in Co. Suffolk when he arrives to the age of twenty two years.

And I will that myne Exors. shall have and take the profytts of the said messuages landes and other premisses untill the said twenty two yeres to fynde said Frounces to Scole and other lernying.

And the overplus of the profytts of the said messuages landes etc. to goo to the fyndings of Bartholomew and James to scole until the said twenty second yere.

And I bequeathe to the said Frounces when he come to the age of twenty two yere fyve pounds.

Also I bequeathe to Bartholomew my sonne fourtie pounds to be payed at twenty two.

Also I bequeathe to James my sonne fourtie pounds at the said age.

And if it shall fortune any of my said sons to dye before they have reseyved their legacies of bequest of money then I will that their parte or partes be equally devyded among the residue of my sonnes then being alyve.

Also I bequeathe to eche of my godchildren twelve pence.

Also I bequeathe to my sister Lokwood an Annuitee of Twenty shillings yerely, to be paide by Thomas my sonne his exors. or assigns at every half yere tenne shillings after my decease during her life. And if it fortune the said twnety shillings or any part thereof to be unpaide at any of the said half yeres which yt ought to be paid that then I will my said syster or her assigns shall enter and dystrayn into my messuages and closes called Bukkys Lede or carry away and withhold until suche tyme my said syster and her assigns be fully satisfied content and payde as well as the said Annuytie of twenty shillings as of tthe arrerage of the same or any parte thereof with her reasonable costs and charges susteyned for the same.

Also I bequeathe to eche of my sisters children nowe being married tenne shillings and to eche of my said syster's children nowe unmarried twenty shillings to be paid at their day of marriage yf they be married before they come to the age of twenty two yeres or ells to be paid to eche of them at their said ages of twenty two.

Also I will that yf Jane my wief at any tyme hereafter cleyme aske demannde or sue for any dowry to have of all my Manners, Lands, and Tenements and other the premisses or ells disturb or sue for any parte or parcell of eny other thing contrary to this my Test. and last Will, then I will my said wyfe to have no parte or parcell of any of all foresaid messuages lands and tenements and other the premisses to her before given or bequeathed nor no other legacie or bequest in this my last will conteyned.

Also I will yf any of all my children shall make eny sute trobyll or cleym to or for eny maner of landes tenement or other thing or things contrary to this my Test. and last Will in disturbance of this my said will then I will that on suche childe or children so cleyming any parte or parcel of my landes tenements or goodes other than I have to them severally given or assigned by this my last will, shall have no parte or parcell of any legacie or bequest to them or eny of themgiven or bequeathed making any suche trobyll or cleym contrary to this my Test. and last will, but suche legacie andbequest to be at the dysposicion of myne Exers.

and as concerning the thirde parte of my manners of Royden and Royden Tuft with appurts. in Royden and Bresingham, and all my lands tenements, meadows, pastures, woods weyes with revercions and herditaments in Royden, Brysingham and Dysse in Co. of Norfk with all my messuages, lands, tenement meadows, pastures, woods, weyes, etc. lying or being in Yaxlee, Thrandeston and Lytell Thronham in co. Suffk, together with the Revercion of all the aforesaid landes, tenements and hereditments in Yaxlee and Eye aforesaid, after the decease of Jane my wief which I have heretofore in this my said last will geven and assigned to Jane for terme of herlife except only such lands and tenements in Dysse and Breseworth aforesaid which I have heretofore geven and assigned to Frounces my sonne, I give and bequeath them holy to Thomas my sonne and to his heyres and assgns.

Also I bequeath to Robert Woodcroft 40s. to be payd when he comythe of age twenty two years yf he be rulyd and orderyd by myne exors.

And all the residue of my goodes cattells debts mony plate and all my other goodes as well moveable as not moveable I put them holy to the good disposicion of myne exors. to the performance of this my test. and last wyll and to the bringing up of my children being within age untill they come to the age of twenty one yeres. I ordeyn and make Robert Kene of Trandeston gentleman and Thomas my sonne myne exors.

And the said Robert to have for his labors and paynes twenty shillings.

And supervisors of this my test. and last will. I shall desire and requyer Sir Henry Bedingfeld, Knight to be one to whom I give for his payne and favor for and in edying of my Exors. with his good council and assistance fourtie shillings.

By me, Thomas Sherman

Witness: John Whethyngham Edward Torold William Eglyn, vicar of Yaxlee

Proved at London, 16 day of November, 1551 by the oath of Thomas Sherman. Dated January 20, 1550 (Bucke 32) P.C.C. F.D.S. 15-18
------------------------------------------------------------ ------------

The above Will can be found in "Some of the Descendants of Philip Sherman, The First Secretary of Rhode Island"by Roy V. Sherman, pp. 5-8.

[NI0487] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!All information from Sharon K Weaver.

[NI0488] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!All information from Sharon K Weaver.

[NI0489] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: ED138 Sh4 Ln75
Date: 9 Jan 1920
Citation Comments: Lists age as 8.
Title: 1920 Census, Palm Beach, Florida
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Local Register #652, Book 5
Title: DeSoto County, Florida Death Record
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

!1920 Florida Census, Palm Beach Co., age 8. Donna's mom says he died from complications with measles. She doesn't know why he was in DeSoto Co, but he may be buried next to his mother.

[NI0490] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!All information from Sharon K Weaver.

[NI0494] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!All information from Sharon K Weaver.

[NI0497] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!1920 Census, Palm Beach Co., FL lists William and Hazel living with
Issac N.
Marquis, Hazel is daughter in law. We assume that means she is
married to
William

# ID: I11902
# Name: Hazel Unknown 1 2
# Sex: F
# Birth: 1890 in , , Nebraska 1 2
# Death: BEF 1928 in , , Florida 1 2
# Reference Number: MXXH3I
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

!1920 Census, Palm Beach Co., FL lists William and Hazel li ving with
Issac N. Marquis, Hazel is daughter in law. We assume that means sh e is
married to
William



Marriage 1 William Edgar Marquis b: 13 AUG 1879 in Winfield, Cowley, Kansas

* Married: AFT 1910 1 2
* Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

!She was not listed with him on 1910 census, but was on 192 0.

Children

1. Has No Children Living Marquis


Sources:

1. Title: 684427.ged
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 6, 2002
2. Title: wood.FTW
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 20, 2002

[NI0499] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!Cumrine's history says Moses married Miss Turner. The 1830 census
lists her as 40-50, probably closer to 50 based on husband's age.
She is not listed on his will in 1838 suggesting she died between
1830 and 1838. There is a John Turner in Washington County PA in 1790 that could be her daughter. He has a daughter, no age listed, and three sons under 16. In 1800 ther are James, John, and Samuel.

[NI0500] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!Abstracts of the Minutes of the Court of Pleas and Quarter Sessions, Rowan County, North Carolina, 1763-1774 show the following entries: II:657. 17 Oct. 1766 - Direct that Wm. McCulloh orphant of John McCul' Decd be bound unto Arter Erwy for and during the term of 8 Yrs 3 Mos to Learn him the Art and Mistry of a Taylor... Orderd that John McCulloh, orphant to John McCulloh Decd be bound unto John Johnson...to learn him the Art and Mistry of a Carpender. II:679. 16 Jan. 1767 - Ordered P Cur that James McCulloh orphant Child of John McCulloh Decd be Bound to James Smiley to larn him the Art and mistery of a Weaver he being aged 9 1/2 years old and that he serve his master till he Arive to the Age 21... II:693. 16 Apr. 1767 - Orderd by the Court that William McCulloh orphant Sun of John McCulloh Decd be Bound an Apprentice to Geo Marshall...to larn him the Art and Mystry of a House Joiner...to serve his Master 7 Years, 6 mos... II:694. 16 Apr. 1767 - Orderd by the Court, that Jane McCulloh orphant Daughter of John McCulloh Decd Bound...to Mrs. Elizabeth Cathey, of the County, Widow... III:335. 5 May 1772 - John McCulloh, orphan who has been bound to John Johnson to be house carpenter, is now bound to Wm Bonner to Larn the Art and Mistry of a Tanner and Curriur to Sarve his Master 3 yrs. 8 mos, Master to comply with John Johnson's agreement. John McCullough went to Kentucky soon after the end of the Revolutionary War, appearing on a tax list for Fayette County in 1790, Bourbon County in 1793 and 1795, Clark County in 1796 and Montgomery County in 1797. In 1793 he bought 230 acres in Mercer County on Harrods Landing Run and in February 1795 acquired an additional 10. Ellen Layton references an article written by a grandson of James McCullough, Simeon McCullough Jr, that reads: "Our grandfather's name was James McCullough. There were two other sons, one named John and the other William...Shortly after the opening of the Revolutionary War these three brothers enlisted in the Colonial Army, James and John serving the entire eight years, William was killed at Brandywine. The surviving brothers...emigrated to Montgomery Co., KY. John soon settled in Ripley Co., Ind...that he was held in high esteem is evidenced by the fact that nearly one thousand people attended his funeral. He was buried with honors of war, the United States flag suspended crossed over his body and a military salute, fired by old Revolutionary comrades over the grave." This account was from his boyhood memory of a visit from his grandfather and oral history from his father. John McCullough bought 228 acres of land in Montgomery Co., KY in 1802. He was listed on the Tax Roll with this acreage through 1816. In 1816-1817 he is listed with livestock. At the Jeffersonville Land Office, David McCullough, son of John, bought land on two occasions; 11 Feb, 1816 and 12 Sep, 1816. This land was near Haney's Corner post office as viewed on a late 19th century atlas of Ripley County, Indiana. In the Jefferson Co., IN 1850 census Constant McCullough is living in the home of Jeremiah and Keziah McCullough Sallyers, her daughter and son-in-law. In another account of John McCullough's war service given by his grandson, Samuel Clinton McCullough, son of John Jr. and Sarah Morgan: On Feb 8, 1777 he fought in Captain Cole's 4th regiment. He served in the battle of the River Reason where he was pierced through the body with a bayonet. He recovered to be present at the storming of Stoney Point, New York on 15 July, 1779 where he received a similar wound through the hip. 1300 continental soldiers with unloaded muskets overwhelmed 700 British soldiers in a silent nightime attack. He recovered from his wound and lived to receive his honorable discharge with his comrades. He re-enlisted at Charleston, South Carolina where he met with an accident which cost him his thumb. He was engaged in battle at the last siege of Charleston. This battle lasted from March to May of 1780, in which General Washington's troops were surrounded by 14,000 British. The town was surrendered and the prisoners of war placed on parole, as long as they never fought the British again.

************************************************************ ***********
Clan McCullough Newsletter 6855199
JOHN MCCULLOUGH
1790 Tax List, Fayette Co, KY
1793 Tax List Bourbon co, KY
1794 Tax List Bourbon co, KY
1795 Tax List Bourbon co, KY
1796 Tax List Clark co, KY
1797 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1798 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1799 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1800 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1801 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1802 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1803 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1804 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1805 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1806 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1807 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1808 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1809 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1810 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1811 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1812 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1813 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1814 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1815 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1816 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1817 Tax List Montgomery co, KY
1818 Tax List Montgomery co, KY

1802 bought 228 acres, Montogermy Co, deeds.
Not found after 1818.

A John McCullough married Constant Jones, filed in 1787 in Mercer Co, KY.

John bought land in Mercer Co. in Oct 1793. The deed read John McCullough "of Bourbon Co." Land was sold in March 1795 by John McCullough and wife Constant.

John Jefferson 1830 p 140
James Jefferson 1830 p 135

John Ripley 1840 p 168
James Ripley 1840 p 162
************************************************************ ***********

1820 Census, Ripley Co, p 73
John McCullough
M 16-18
2M 18-26
M 26-45
M>45
F<10
F 10-16
F>45

[NI0501] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!National Archives Revolutionary War Records, No. 9558, certificate issued 28 Dec. 1848. Declaration by Constant McCullough to receive Widow's pension in order to obtain the benefit of the act of Congress of the 7th July, 1838 entitled "An Act granting half pay and pensions to certain widows". State of Indiana, Ripley County On this 10th day of March Eighteen hundred and forty, Personally appeared before the Circuit Court of the County aforesaid Constant McCullough a resident of the state of Indiana, in the County of Ripley, aged Seventy years, who beig first duly sworn, according to the law, doth on her oath make the following declaration, in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the act of Congress, passed July 7th, 1838 entitled "An act granting half pay and pensions to certain widows". That she is the widow of John McCullough who was a private soldier in the regular army of the North Carolina troops in the Revolutionary War for further evidence she inserts the following certificate: "State of North Carolina, Secretary of States Office I, William Hill, Secretary of State in and for the State of North Carolina do hereby certify that it appears from the muster rolls of the continental line of this State in the Revolutionary war that John McCullough enlisted as a private Soldier in Capt. Cole's Company of the 4th Regiment on the 8th day of February 1777 for the term of three years, that he was a prisoner on the 14th day of April 1779, and mustered again in November 1779...Given under my hand this 28th day of November 1839, Wm Hill" She further declares that she was married to the said John McCullough on the tenth day of December in the year Seventeen hundred and eighty seven; that her husband, the aforesaid John McCullough died on the fifteenth day of June Eighteen hundred and twenty three; that she was not married to him prior to his leaving the service, but the marriage took place previous to first of January, Seventeen hundred and ninety four, viz. at the time stated. Constant (X her mark) McCullough. Sworn to and subscribed on the day and year above written, before me in open court. C. Overturf, Clerk

The 1850 Census, Ripley, IN shows her living with Jeremiah Salyers and her daughter Keziah, 80 years old, born VA
1850 Ripley co, Union twp
Jeremiah Salyers 59 KY
Keziah 56 KY
Fletcher 24 IN
Mary Ann 19 IN
Katherine 22 IN
Elizabeth 16 IN
Constant McCullough 80 VA

[NI0503] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!Ellen Layton documents that he received a land grant from Lord Granville in Fourth Creek area in NC 25 Mar, 1752. He sold part of the 640 acres and later lost the rest. He died in 1766, leaving four minor children who show up in Rowan County court minutes between 1763 and 1774.

[NI0504] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!Ellen Layton provided this data and referenced the family history book by Mabel Maxey and Jimmy McSween, "James McCullough and Descendants", 1991, pg 1-6. She also writes, "In the book "Carolina Cradle", author Robert Ramsay states that a James McCullough settled in Fallowfield Township, Chester Co., Penn. by 1739 or 1740 and went to North Carolina after 1747. (ref: tax lists) James recieved a land grant from Lord Granville on February 1, 1755, for 386 acres on the Catawba River in the Davidson Creek area. His two sons, Alexander and John, recieved grants in the Fourth Creek region March 25, 1752. Some of the grants were surveyed as early as 1749. James McCullough died in December 1757 and his will was probated in January 1758. His wife Elizabeth and son Alexander were named executors. He left land to sons Alexander, Samuel, John, and William, mentioning his grandson Matthew. Samuel received the homeplace, dying about 1771 intestate without heirs, so Alexander as the eldest brother then inherited the land.

[NI0559] Referred to as Halsey Healy (sic) in DAR Lineage Book number 72863.

Hon. or Col. Cyrus Eaton p261 v2

from Cyrus Eaton p314 v1:
The business of the Mill River district began to revive, however, in a small way ; and this year, on the 5th or 6th of June, during one of the snow-squalls of that disastrous season, was launched the schooner Lavinia, 88 tons, Capt. John B. Hawk-, built by James Stackpole, John Blackington, and J. Wheaton. Col. Halsey Healey also began his career in shipbuilding in the same neighborhood by launching the schooner Catharine of 105 tons, Capt. Barnabas Webb, master. Healey also set up in business as a merchant in a partnership with Dr. Dodge, which, through the pleasing address and urbanity of the younger, and the extensive influence of the elder partner, was now attracting considerable custom. As characteristic of Dodge's love of fun and profit at the same time, it is related that on a professional visit at the house of Mr. Holland, at Ash Point, seeing many of the family busily employed in their occupation of making lace, he curiously inspected the operation, made many inquiries as to the quantity, price, &c., and finally, buying up all they had, put it, marked as "Holland lace," into the company's store; where, as a foreign manufacture of wonderful cheapness, it met with a rapid sale.

from Cyrus Eaton p353 v1:
Business in 1825 was generally prosperous. Large quantities of lime were manufactured, at 90 to 95 cents in Boston. Navigation did well, some of it remarkably so; and shipbuilding flourished. Col. Healey, this year, paid bills cf different mechanics employed by him to the amount of $50,000. To facilitate the increasing commerce of this and other places on Penobscot Bay, a light house of granite was this year built on Owl's Head promontory, in what is now South Thomaston, and lighted up, for the first time, about the end of September. A keeper's house was also put up, and Isaac Stearns was, Sept. 10, 1825, ippointed the first keeper, retaining his office 13 years. His successors have been, Wm. Masters, appointed Aug. 3, 1838 ; Perley Haines, July 28, 1841

from Cyrus Eaton p358 v1:
The principal merchants and ship-owners at this time were, Col. Healey, Esq. Gleason, Maj. Foster, T. McLellan, Jr., B. Green, P. Keegan, W. Cole, W. R. Keith, and R. C. Counce, at the western village: 1. Kimball, J. Spear, 0. Fales, J. Lovejoy, C. Holmes, K. Crockett, and Ephraim Perry, at the Shore; J. Adatns, at Owl's Head, and E. Snow, Jr., at Wessaweskeag. The Shore or eastern village had of late been rapidly gaining upon other parts of the town; its merchants had become wealthy; and its trade and navigation were thought to be about equal to that of the western village. An attempt was made in the course of 1 ' 827 to obtain the establishment of a daily instead of a bi-weekly mail; which was accomplished in the spring of 1828.

from Cyrus Eaton p366 v1:
1829 ... Col. Healy, who had for many years been the principal shipbuilder and business man at Mill River, launched, Nov. 1Oth, of this year, the brig Pensacola, -the last of his operations in that line. Using materials and employing workmen from this ,and the neighboring towns, his business had been a great public benefit in stimulating the industry and increasing the wealth of the community. In the course of it, besides the large amount of lime and other products required for outward bound freight, he had built one ship ' twelve brigs, five schooners, and one sloop, amounting in all to 3390 tons. It was, therefore, to the general regret, that his beneficial course of business should have been, by unforeseen reverses, brought to a premature close, - particularly so, to the immediate vicinity of Mill River, then the general centre of business for the whole town, St. George, and Cushing, but from which it began, -,after this time, to remove eastward to the Shore, and westward to the Bank corner, Prison corner, and neighboring wharves.

[Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Ancestry W.T. file #44499 submitter: Referred to as Halsey Healy (sic) in DAR Lineage Book number 72863.
Col. Halsey Healey also began his career in shipbuilding in the same neighborhood by launching the schooner Catharine of 105 tons, Capt. Barnabas Webb, master. Healey also set up in business as a merchant in a partnership with Dr. Dodge,

[NI0571] DAR Record

[NI0576] DAR Record

[NI0578] Achorn Cemetary records: Record 1751; pg 3 Ave C Lot # 74 - date of birth listed - the text states "The date of birth, 1839 seem like an error or husband's of 1879 is wrong." Her husband's birth is listed as 8/18/1840 on his death certificate.

death certificate lists undertaker as E. A. Burpee of Rockland.

Census of 1900 indicates only 1 child

[NI0583] Margaret Kirkpatrick, her mother, would only be 13 years old. ? if J. M. Bartlett had a first wife.

[NI0588] came from Attleboro, Massachusetts and purchased in1780, one-half the John Alexander lot, Thomaston on which he resided and died January 1826 age 76 Cyrus Eaton p467

from Cyrus Eaton p153 v1:
Other parts of the town also received some additional settlers during these unsettled times. Nathaniel Woodcock, who bad married a sister of the Healeys, came from Attleboro' to the Oyster River neighborhood, purchased one-half of the John Alexander lot,where he built and resided the remainder of his life. [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

He moved his family from Attleboro, Bristol Co. to Thomaston, Knox Co. (now in Maine), in 1780, and bought one-half of the Alexander lot in the "Oyster" river neighborhood, where they lived during the remainder of their lives. (Per FTM On-line page at 1428_49.html. "Woodcock Genealogy", p.49.)

[NI0597] died without children per Cyrus Eaton

[NI0614] [Eliphaz Healey.FTW]

His son, Capt. Edward C. Healey married his sister's daughter, Sarah Reed
Spear. They were 1st cousins!

[NI0615] From History Of Thomaston, Rockland, and South Thomaston, Maine v2 Cyrus Eaton p261:
came also to Thomaston and settling near; was a farmer and d. Feb 18 1842

[NI0621] [Eliphaz Healey.FTW]

3 Apr 1664 is baptismal date.
[William Healy Ancestors.FTW]

According to the Genealogical Dictionary of Maine & New Hampshire, he served in King Phillip's War from Hampton. However, Col. Haley points out that King Phillip's War took place in 1675, when Paul was only 11 or 12 years old! Ergo, it seems Paul must have been involved in another, later Indian War.[Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to the Genealogical Dictionary of Maine & New Hampshire, he served in King Phillip's War from Hampton. However, Col. Haley points out that King Phillip's War took place in 1675, when Paul was only 11 or 12 years old! Ergo, it seems Paul must have been involved in another, later Indian War.

[NI0623] [Eliphaz Healey.FTW]

Progenitor HEALY immigrant to America from Ireland of this line.

*****


See William Healy folder in Healey Family Folder in Genealogy folder in My Documents

From notes of Teresa Haldorson:

"Was born in 1613, evidently a descendant of Hugh Hele, progenitor of the Cornwood line of Hele's in Devon, (Herald's Visitations of 1620) as Banks' Topographical Dictionary of English Emigrants to New England, from 1620 to 1630, lists him as coming from Comwood. Hugh's son, John Hele, married Alide Fortescue of Comwood and had three sons. The eldest. Richard Hele, established his residence in Neary, but Richard's son John Hele is described in Vivian's Visitations of the County of Devon as "of Comwood" the last reported as of that place. This seems to be as close as we can get to the origin of William Hele who came to the Colonies. The Society of Genealogists in London have a transcsript of Comwood parish registers, but unfortunately the period covered is 1685-1834; the earlier registers having been destroyed by fire there. In adition to the loss of the earlier registers, the Society reports that Devonshire wills were destroyed by enemy action in World War II, 1939-1945.

American histories say William Hele came first to Lynn, Mass. about 1640 where he early joined the church; became a freeman in Marshfield in 1643, was of Roxbury in 1649, and finally was dismissed from the church in "Lin" to join that in Cambridge with his family. There he settled "upon the rocks" apparently the rocky ridge upon which Harvard Observatory now stands. A street in this area is still called Healey Street. He had five wives and his twelve children were born in Roxbury and Cambridge.

An esteem citizen, a church member, a landholder, and prison-keeper for ten years from 1672 to 1682, at the age of seventy years he was charged with a misdemeanor. Fabricated accusations prompted by jealousy or vindictiveness were not uncommon in the Colonies between 1656 and 1692. He died within a year, 11/28/1683, and his remains lie in "The Old Burying Grounds" in
Cambridge.

References: Bowen's Genealogies ofWoodstock Families, Vol. VII, p. 18;
Ellis' History ofRoxbury; Encyclopedia of Mass. Vol. 5, p 172
New England Hist. Gen. Reg. Vol. 27, p 139;
Harris' Epitaphs of the Old Burying Grounds at Cambridge;
Paige's History of Cambridge;
Records of Cambridge—Grants by Selectmen, P. 238;
London Society of Genealogists from Herald's Visitations.

*****

from: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~walkersj/WilliamHealy.htm

William Healy

"The formal complaint lodged on 30 July 1666 against William Healey of Cambridge for maltreating his wife came from her brother Samuel Green and her brother-in-law Thomas Langhorn. However, the most damning evidence came from two servants, Samuel Reynolds and Daniel Beckley.
On the 13th of Aprill William Healey sent us to Boston, but as before our departure he was chiding his wife we therfor went back to the house and saw sd. Healey beating and kicking her. On the 7th of May after all were a bed the child begann to crie and Healey told her to quiet the child but it continuing he bid her to lye further off or else he would stick his teeth down her throat and he struck her with his hand and she cried out, then he took her by the wrists and twisted her to pieces (as she afterwards said) so that she wore a plaister for two weeks and cried with the pain of it for two hours. Healey hearing us talking in bed made a bemoaning of himself as though she had beaten him and listening again he did not hear us and said to her Ah Wicked roan hast though not done houling yet & bid her cry aloud her God was asleep and bid her gett all her lyes in a bag together and present them to her God he would not hear her else. On 27th of May there was a falling out in bed and Daniel Beckley counted three blowes and she said Will you kill me then fove blows then eight. Next morning William Healey owned to Sam Reynolds that he had struck her four or five times. When Daniel Beckley was setting him over to Boston he admitted that he struck her but told him to say nothing, let her prove it. On the last of June a Saturday we were returning with Arthur from Boston when we heard a great noise from the house; we held still our oars and heard three blows and shee looking out at the window cryed for Gods sake help me he will kill me. William Healey said some of us had given her tobacco & now she was mad. His wife came from the chamber and vexed him and he caried her to the chamber and beat her. She spoke without any distemper. His constant dayly course was to curse att her & revile her & her friends, her generation as he called them beggars. He referred to her brothers Langhorn and Greene to their disgrace & all her generation were thieves and whoremasters. Concerning her he would say God had burnt out one of her eyes & drawn up one side of her mouth & he would quickly do the like to the other & make her a spectacle of his wrath. He oft twitt her in the teeth of her being a [church] member, saying the church saw nothing in her wherefore they received her in but that she made two or three fine kerchies...he would oft tell her of her being nailed to the door and threshold...she remonstrated with him saying he must answer for them [his sins] one day before God to which he replyed do you take Gods name in your mouth; you might as well take my arse in your mouth you prophane woman...him let him be brought forth and he would strip in the street...[they were] damned rogues and whores that know any evill by him and do not bring him forth.
Daniel Gookin and Thomas Danforth examined the couple together. The wife (whose first name we never discover from the records) substantiated the servants' testimony, adding some further details. her husband had also called her "lying slut" and had used "a wand the size of a good riding rod" to beat her. Healey admitted reproachful words and some violence, but it was "not to hurt her" or was merely "accidental blowes riseing from the bed." The incident heard from the boat on the last Saturday in June arose when "she put out her neck and said Come old Healey cutt off my head and he gave her a chuck under the chin & that was all. The wife says she desired she may never have a like chuck for it was to be seen many days after.
In a written statement to court, Healey pointed out that the servants evidence was "their apprehensions, not what they saw" and that noise and a clamorous woman tend to go together. He cited a statement by Beckley to "my mother Ives (wife of Miles Ives of Roxbury), that if his dame had nobody to scould at she would scould at the wall...If any words have passed from him in his passion, which are not according to godlinesse, he desires to be deeply humbled for them in the sight of God and men."
Healey's final counterthrust was to question the motives of his two servants, Reynolds "a loose and scandalous person," had been refused permission to marry Healey's daughter. Beckley, "a refractory servant," sought to "recompense his master for his correcting him for his miscarriages." Support for Healey's defense came from two sources. Reynolds was committed on 12 August 1667 for fathering a bastard on Healey's daughter and for going to his house "in a violent manner causing William Healey to cry out murther." John Guy, aged twenty-two, who had often worked at Healey's recounted verbal provocations.
We won morning were att brekfast and she having the child in her armes he cutt her a peece of cheese and asked her if she would have itt and she apon no other ocagion tooke it and threw it at him and bid him eate it himselfe for she did believe that he did gruge it to her and apon no other ocagion cald him Tom Tinker and ould Heiley and ould roge and said he was a murderer and had murdered three wifes already and would murder her; then his answere was to her was this; poor woman I am sory to see thee thus discomposed and desired the lord to give her grase and many times I have heard him say to her that if that she would but be quiet with him he would let her have any thing that she wanted and she should do nothing.
Not suprisingly the aged Elizabeth Green, the wife's mother, painted a rather different picture, "when her face was burnt he tooke upon him to dres her face, when her face was sore, and spoild it." She described "his carage and his childrens to her how she was slited and if anything was wasted or amis...she had done it...She hath not so much authority as to give her children any victuals but what she must ask his daughters for. If he was reproved, he threatened "he would leave [her] and now he hath spoild her he would divers times bid her get her to her friends." Finally in claiming the foresight of mothers-in-law through the ages, she referred to her unwillingness to give consent to the match and the promises the ardent Healey had made to quiet her apprehensions of her daughter's likely "discouragement in the family from himself or children."
Although, tantalizingly, the court's judgement on this case has not survived, the testimony gives us a remarkably vivid insight into family dynamics; generational conflict between an old husband of fifty-three and a wife twenty years younger; the mythic wicked stepmother here transformed into the isolated and pilloried intruder, the jeolousy of a church member of long standing for one of the recently elected saints; the reprisal powers of servants against stern masters; the baby as a source of conflict and bed as a battlefield - one of the few places available for private warfare.
The violent marriage came to an end in 1671 when the fourth Goodwife Healey seems to have died in childbirth. We know from other sources that Healey held the post of keeper of the prision in Cambridge during the 1670s and early 1680s. As such he was able legally to keep his flogging arm in trim as the official executor of corporal punishment. In 1674 his services were employed by Harvard College to give a public whipping to an undergraduate who had uttered blasphemous words concerning the Holy Ghose. In 1682 when he was sixty-nine, he was caught in the prison in the act of copulation with the already heavily pregnant Mary Lovell. For this, he was dismissed from his post, evicted from his house, and sentenced with a certian poetic justice to be whipped twenty stripes in April 1683. Six months later the flogged flogger flagged and died. He left an estate worth only six pounds." (Sex in Middlesex by Roger Thompson)

"Healey's age in 1666 was fifty-three, at most twenty-three years older than his wife. Previously he had been married to (1) Grace Ives, whose first child by him had been baptized in 1644; she had died in childbirth in 1649; (2) Mary, daughter of Rev. Nathaniel Rogers of Ipswich, married in 1650, died in 1653; (3) Grace Buttress, married 1653, who was dead by 1660. The Healey's had had three children since their marriage in 1661; Samuel born in Sept. 1662, Paul in April 1664, and Mary in Oct. 1665. She was in fact Phoebe, daughter of Bartholomew Green who had died in 1635 two years after his arrival in Cambridge. She must have been at least twenty-five when she married Healey on 15 June 1661.
No more children were baptized to them after 1665. On 8 April 1672, Thomas Langhorn was keeping Hannah Healey, born in 1671, and receiving five pounds from the town rate.
Healey's fifth marriage, in 1677, was to widow and school dame, Sarah Brown. [William Healy Ancestors.FTW]

He came to the Mass. Bay Colony in 1636, residing first at Saugus (now Lynn), Essex Co., then Roxbury, Suffolk Co., (c. 1644), & later in Cambridge, Middlesex Co. (c. 1653)...

He was an admitted Freeman at Marshfield in 1643. He was a prison keeper as early as 1674 until 29 Dec 1682. He was removed from his position for gross misconduct, "sentenced to be severely whipped 20 stripes," and became an inmate of the prison.

He died intestate.[Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

He came to the Mass. Bay Colony in 1636, residing first at Saugus (now Lynn), Essex Co., then Roxbury, Suffolk Co., (c. 1644), & later in Cambridge, Middlesex Co. (c. 1653)...

He was an admitted Freeman at Marshfield in 1643. He was a prison keeper as early as 1674 until 29 Dec 1682. He was removed from his position for gross misconduct, "sentenced to be severely whipped 20 stripes," and became an inmate of the prison.

He died intestate.

*****

from: http://fosterfamily.surnames.com/gedhtree/beckstrom/np20.htm#iin370

Christening:
Date: 18 Aug 1613
Place: Bottesford, Lincolnshire, England

Individual Note:
BIOGRAPHY: Summary of William Healy of New England and evidence that he was William Healey of Burringham is summarized as follows:
1. The names of the two individuals are identical, - William Healey and William Healy, - the surname of the latter appearing in the records often spelled Healey.
2. The birth date of William Healey of Burringham appears to be identical with the birth date of William Healy, which we know to be 1613.
3. William Healey of Burringham was a younger son, without prospect of inheritance, and therefore ripe for opportunity to better his fortune in the new world.
4. The opportunity was at hand in the Puritan emigration of the decade 1630-1640, heavily recruited from his home vicinity u under local Lincolnshire leaders, and made particularly available by the encouragement given to emigrants by the merchants of the nearby city of old Boston.
5. At this time, about 1636, the young William Healy appears in the Massachusetts Bay Colony at Lynn, and as a member of the church of Lynn, - a community founded by and under the
leadership of Rev. Samuel Whiting, of Boston in Lincolnshire.
6. William Healey of Burringham is not accounted for in family records of later years, whereas all three of his brothers are carried on in the family pedigree.
7. William Healy of New England appears to have been known to have been of gentility, in that he was accepted by families of high standing, though not overly successful in his own right.
8. His benefactress, the widow Elizabeth Merrick, who bequeathed money to him, and who took a special interst in his children, was from Lincolnshire.
9. William Healy's first close association in New England, and his first marriage, was with the Suffolk family of Ives; two of the brothers of William Healey of Burringham had made marriages with a Suffolk gentry family.
10.The whole later career of William Healy in the colony tends to indicate that he might well have been the restless son of a good family, never very fortunate, and not able to merge too successfully into the surroundings in which he found himself in the new world.
This circumstantial evidence as to the origin of William Healy of New England makes an interesting and convincing case, and if the conclusion reached is correct, four generations of family lineage are added to the nimber recorded in America. If it is true that he was William Healey of Burringham, the line of descent goes back unbroken to the early years of the sixteenth century and the days of Henry VIII.

BIOGRAPHY: William Healy married for the fourth time on 15 August 1661. This marriage was to Phebe Green, daughter of Bartholomew Green and his wife Elizabeth. It is from this marriage that the descents of the Nova Scotia and Ontario Haley families are traced. Bartholomew Green had come to New England in 1634 with his wife, his sons Samuel and Nathaniel, and his daughters Sarah and Phebe. He had died within a year after his coming. About 1646 the daughter Sarah had married Thomas Longhorne, who was a butcher and also the Cambridge town drummer. The widow Elizaabeth Green and her unmarried daughter Phebe were long members of the Cambridge church, as was William Healy. At the time of his marriage he was forty-eight years of age, and Phebe Green was approaching forty. In the next few years William Healy continued with his business, which required several servants and apprentices. William Healy was one of the signers of a petition addressed to the General Court, expressing loyalty to his majesty the King, and satisfaction with the present government, provided the chartered rights of the Colony were not interfered with. Three children were born to Phebe Green during this period. The first was a son, Samuel, second of William Healy's children to bear the name. He was baptized in Cambridge church 21 September 1662. Another son Paul, ancestor of the Nova Scotia and Ontario families, was baptized 3 April 1664. A daughter, Mary, second of the name, was baptized on 29 October 1665. About this time began an interlude of six distress ridden years. The story can be read in the Middlesex County Court records, where the testimony of parties and witnesses is set down with the utmost Elizabethan frankness. Phebe Green seems to have suffered severe burns, leaving her face badly scarred and causing blindness in one of her eyes. She seems not to have recovered from the shock, and to have verged on being a psychopathic case. She began to complain of abuse by her husband, and of domineering by her husband's daughters, and seems to have given way to melancholia. Her aged mother, distressed by the situation, and believing her story, prevailed upon her son, Phebe's brother Samuel Green, with her son-in-law, Thomas Longhorne, to bring action against William Healy for abuse of his wife. The parties were examined and testimony of witnesses was taken before the Middlesex Court 30 July 1666. The case was set for hearing 2 October 1666, at which time additional affidavits of witnesses were presented, and the answer of William Healy was made. The witnesses against him were, in particular, two of his servants, Samuel Reynolds and Daniel Beckley, and they told a most lurid story, William Healy, in defense, showed that they were prejudiced against him, in that Samuel Reynolds was a loose and scandalous person to whom he had denied his daughter Elizabeth's hand in marriage, and that Daniel Beckley was a refractory servant, "seeking occasion to recompense his Master for his correcting him for his miscarriages." Some testimony was given in William Healy's behalf, - that he had been patient to the extreme in the face of shrewish outbursts by his wife. The Court seems to have taken this view of the matter, and the case ended. It must be remembered that mental disturbance was not viewed in those days as it is now, and that restraint and attempted correction were the only courses open to a husband with an afflicted wife. In August 1667, the following year, Samuel Reynolds, the first of the witnesses mentioned above, was shown to be a rascal, when he was arrested and confined for an attempted violent assault upon William Healy, and for misconduct with the second daughter, Elizabeth. After this incident Elizabeth seems to have gone to live with her married sister Hannah at Salisbury, and for a time there appears to have been relative quiet in William Healy's home. In 1672 William Healy was appointed Prison Keeper of Cambridge. On an ill-starred day in October, 1682, a damsel named Deborah Cane, aged 28, venturing into the prison and up the stairs unannounced, claimed that she detected William Healy in compromising circumstances with one Mary Lovell, a strumpet who had been confined in his custody. She, "in great amazement and shame",reported the fact to one Zachery Hicks. A self appointed committee of Hicks, Goldin Moore, and John Gove saw William Healy about the matter, and he "utterly denied ye thing." Some time later he came to Goldin Moore's house, "at their desire", which probably means under compulsion, as John Gove was a constable, and, "after some paines wer tooke wth him hee did Confess yt it was true." From this language it may be surmised that the meeting was of the nature of what in modern times is called the third degree. The shock and the disgrace seem to have been more than the aged man could endure, for he went into a collapse from which he never recovered. In any event, he was removed from his office, was sentenced to be severely whipped, and was imprisoned. He died in prison on 28 November 1683.

*****

from: http://archiver.rootsweb.com/th/read/HEALEY/1999-02/0919447577

From: William Healy
Subject: Healy Roll Call Response
Date: Fri, 19 Feb 1999 11:06:17 -0700

For the Roll Call, this is a straight line of Healys down to me.

William Healy was born in 1613 in Devon, England. He died on 28 Nov
1683 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He was also known as William Hele.
William Healy was married to Phebe Green on 15 Aug 1661.

Paul Healy was born about 3 Apr 1664 in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He
died on 12 Mar 1717 in Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Paul Healy was married
to Elizabeth Smith about 1695.

Samuel Healy was born on 7 Mar 1697 in Rehoboth, Massachusetts. Samuel
Healy was married to Rebecca Chadwick on 1 Jun 1721.

Recompense Healy was born on 30 Jun 1742 (or 41 or 40) in Attleboro,
Massachusetts. He died on 14 May 1808 in Providence, Rhode Island. He
was married to Lucy ?.

William Healy Sr. was born about 1774. He was married to Sarah Card.

William Healy Jr. was born on 3 Aug 1798. He died on 4 Oct 1865 in
Barkhamsted, Connecticut. William Healy Jr. was married to Clarissa
Gloannah Higby on 6 Oct 1824 in Middletown, Connecticut.

Ozias Case Healy was born on 9 Jul 1825 in Colchester, CT. He died on
12 Mar 1913 in Mapleton, Minnesota. Ozias Case Healy was married to
Isabelle Barker Shaw on 18 Nov 1850.

William Higby Healy was born on 16 Jun 1869 in Mapleton, Minnesota. He
died on 23 Sep 1951 in Glenburn, North Dakota. William Higby Healy was
married to Emma Marie Drews on 3 Dec 1894.

William Carleton Healy was born on 11 Sep 1895 in Mapleton, Minnesota.
He died on 11 Apr 1988 in Grosse Pointe, Michigan. William Carleton
Healy was married to Lois Philbrick on 3 Jun 1922.

Me = William Carleton Healy, Jr.

[NI0628] [Eliphaz Healey.FTW]

Apparently married sister of Tileston Healey. Sarah Reed Spear was therefore
first cousin to her husband, Edward C. Healey.

[NI0629] resides Rockland, Maine per Cyrus Eaton p261

[NI0638] from History Of Thomaston, Rockland, and South Thomaston, Maine v2 p261
died unm

[NI0647] from History Of Thomaston, Rockland, and South Thomaston, Maine v2 p261:
probably died young or removed to

[NI0680] went to California 1851 where he was mate of steamer Cortez and commanded the b'k Charles Devin but died in Rock. per Cyrus Eaton p262

[NI0721] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died in infancy, per FTM On-line page 1428_49.html "Woodcock Genealogy".

[NI0725] he was a twin

[NI0731] according to Joan Hooper, he died in Libby Prison - fought in the civil war.

according to Joan Hooper, page 9: First Maine Calvary company B, Ezekiel Winslow age 30, resident of Rockland and listed Rockland Sept. 21st, 1861. Oct. 19th, 1861 Regt Teamster 65, prison November 30, 1863 while hauling forage near Warrentown Jan 9, 1864. Died in prison at Andersonville, GA.

[NI0747] In census of 1900 8 children or 4 alive

[NI0751] No children - personal record Margaret S Wood p10 - possession of William R. Wood, Jr.

[NI0769] Obituitary - found in Family Tree of Margaret Marquis Steeves Wood:

Miss Lucy's father, William A. Farnsworth, was born in Waidoboro- about 1815, the son of Capt. William and Mary Farnsworth, and the grandson of Col. William and Elizabeth (Rutherford) Farnsworth. Her mother, Mary, was the daughter of William and Catherine Sprague, also of Waldoboro.
Born in 1839, Lucy was the second of six children: Josephine F., born about 1837; James R., born about 1841; William, born in 1849 (he died seven years later); Fannie F., born about 1853; and Joseph, who was born in 1857 and was to die at six years old.
Their father died in 1876, when Lucy was 37 years old, and her mother died in 1910, at over 90 years of age.
Mr. Farnsworth had accumulated a large fortune, both from his lime business (the company shipped over 900,000 barrels of lime in the 1860's) and as owner and president of the Rockland Water Company (afterwards taken over by the Camden-Rockland Water Company). This had come into being in 1850, just a month after Rockland changed its name from East Thomaston, having separated from its parent town of Thomaston two years before.
As she outlived all her family, Lucy Farnsworth's fortune had been further increased upon the death of her younger brother James and her two sisters, Mrs. Josephine M. Rollins and Fannie, who had died in the 1880's.
It was known that Miss Lucy dearly loved her father and had accompanied him to inspect his quarries and kilns, or to board the clippers which carried his lime to New York or New Orleans, and this experience combined with a natural, mathematical ability to form a business acumen unusual in women of her time. Miss Farnsworth often acted as her own lawyer where necessary, and her shrewd investment of the composite family fortune which rested in her hands was managed admirably, even though quantities of bank notes were found in the Homestead after her death.
On October 15, 1935, Lucy. Farnsworth was found in her bedroom, her death (according to Dr. H. J. Weisman, then county medical examiner) "due to natural causes - acute dilation of the heart."

[NI0786] Daeth Certificate lists as single

[NI0787] died at 3 month of ages according to Achorn Cemetary records

[NI0793] On funereal records of Aaron Wood

[NI0795] Asa Lizzie Ulmer

Achorn Cemetary died Florence Kansas

[NI0796] This name is on the gravestone. I assume Amanda is from Orville's first marriage to Mary York due to date of birth and marriage of Mary York.

[NI0804] according to Joan Hooper, page 8: Capt. John Ulmer born in Germany 1736. Came to Waldoboro in 1740, married Catherine Remolly, came to Rockland 1794 where with son, George (who came here 1785) settled near the shore somewhere near lime kilns. First lime burners in Rockland and possibly billed first ship and what is now Rockland.

[NI0806] [asaulmerancestor6FTW.FTW]

Was probably the George Ulmer, Jr. who was in the Revolutionary War as a pvt in Capt Abraham Hunt's Co, Col Joseph Vose's Reg't. Enlisted 17 May 1777 for 3 years. Discharged April 1779. In camp at Valley Forge.
Was a quartermaster sergeant and on the non-commissioned staff of Jacob Ulmer's reg't in the War of 1812.

[NI0815] Title: Elaborate History and Genealogy of the Ballous by Adin Ballou, 1888 from The Wright Family Gedcom

[NI0821] Captain

[NI0828] [asaulmerancestor6FTW.FTW]

Mary and John had 13 children. p.249, "Broad Bay Pioneers."

[NI0829] [asaulmerancestor6FTW.FTW]

1. 1742 - the "Lydia" - Captain James Abercrombie. Sailed from Rotterdam to Deal, England, Aug.1742; from Deal Aug.18, 1742 to Marblehead, Mass. (Description sounds like they took the northern passage); arrived at Marblehead on September 24, 1742 after a 38 day voyage.
from:"The Broad Bay Oioneers" p.28

BBP, p.305ff.
Ulmer is a location name, indicating a person from area of town of Ulm. Family origins at Enzberg, Wurttemberg, Germany. Earliest generations from town of Altheim, next to city of Ulm.
Family ancester: Georg Ulmer, of Altheim.

BBP, p.306
In Germany had been a military drummer and schoolmaster (listed in 1733). An obvious leader for the Broad Bay Colony. Apparently acted as Lutheran lay minister or Sunday School teacher for abt.20 years.
Took family w/him on Cape Breton Expedition to Louisbourg, with Zouberbuhler and Waldo. Worked to keep Broad Bay Germans together and make sure all returned to Broad Bay.
Stahl gives following quotes:
"John [Ulmer], Sr. was at Louisburg in 1745, and tradition has it that on the night of May 2nd he lead the Broad Bayers in the successful attack on the arsenal northeast of the harbor which contained great stores of military and naval supplies..." see p.306-7 for other quotes from Stahl.
p.307 also reprints copy of letter of recommendation as schoolmaster from Germany.

[NI0834] [asaulmerancestor6FTW.FTW]

"Board Bay Pioneers" p.248/9
Possibly from Wurttemberg, Germany.
on schoolmasters list, May 1773, living on East side of Broad Bay.
Apparently had military experience in Germany (Stahl); this gave him place of importance during the Indian wars.
Had connections with the Schwartz family and was a good friend of John Ulmer.
It is difficult to trace his German origins; no positive identification has been made. P.249: "Since Matthias Remily was apparently still alive as late as 1797, he must have been a fairly young man at the time of his emigration...At present only one daughter (Mary Katharine)...is known in the Waldoboro area."
Probably at Siege of Louisbourg, 1745, with rest of Broad Bay Germans. On both Ulmer's and North's muster lists of '44 and '45.

[NI0837] [asaulmerancestor6FTW.FTW]

Served with father at 1745 seige of Louisbourg

[NI0842] [asaulmerancestor6FTW.FTW]

Died "extremely pregnant," age 42 yrs., 2 months.

[NI0845] [asaulmerancestor6FTW.FTW]

Died on Palm Sunday, 1726, age 15 1/4

[NI0846] [asaulmerancestor6FTW.FTW]

It is not known if she came to America or was already married and had a family in Germany at the time her father left for New England. p.308.
However, on p.45 she is listed in the reconstructed passanger list of the Lydia, 1742. Her name is in parenthesis.

[NI0857] [asaulmerancestor6FTW.FTW]

Believed to be the John Ulmer who was a pvt in Capt Philip M. Ulmer's Co, Col McCobb's Reg't. He enlisted 8 July 1779, discharged 24 Sept 1779, served 2 months, 16 days on Penobscot Expedition.

[NI0868] [asaulmerancestor6FTW.FTW]

Was a lieutenant in Capt Isaac Bernard's Co, and a major in McCrate's battalion of calvary in the War of 1812.

[NI0870] [asaulmerancestor6FTW.FTW]

Served in War of 1812

[NI0871] [asaulmerancestor6FTW.FTW]

Had 10 children

[NI0873] Never married per The Wright Family GEDCOM http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tcwlmo&id=I12435

[NI0874] Was a farmer in Richmond, NH per Thw Wright Family Gedcom http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tcwlmo&id=I13628

[NI0882] [Lucy Robinson from TWright 111002.FTW]

In 1711 moved from Chilmark, Martha's Vinyard to Attleboro, MA (he purchased the Woodcock Garrison House)
Attleboro representative in 1720
"Deacon"In 1711 moved from Chilmark, Martha's Vinyard to Attleboro, MA (he purchased the Woodcock Garrison House)
Attleboro representative in 1720
"Deacon"

http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tcwlmo&id=I00435

[NI0884] [Lucy Robinson from TWright 111002.FTW]

Was the Governor of Massachusetts

[NI0885] [Lucy Robinson from TWright 111002.FTW]

Changed the family name from Doggett to Daggett.
Clerk and justice to the county courts.

[NI0886] [Lucy Robinson from TWright 111002.FTW]

Came to America in 1630 (Gov. John Winthrop's Fleet) and settled in Watertown, MA in 1642 (Had 15 acres adjoining Fresh Pond). Removed to Martha's Vinyard with Governor Mayhew when he settled the island in 1644.


The name Daggett was originally spelled Doggett but for the sake of conformity and to make my work easier to search I am using the Daggett spelling.

[NI0887] Title: Vital Records of Attleboro 1700 to 1850

[NI0889] [Lucy Robinson from TWright 111002.FTW]

Came to America around 1680 from Scotland and settled in Attleboro, MA.

[NI0891] [Lucy Robinson from TWright 111002.FTW]

Came to America about 1636 from Scotland.
Was admitted as a freeman in Dedham, MA in 1643

[NI0909] Records obtained from The First Congregational Church in North Attleboro, MA

Wright Family Gedcom

[NI0910] [Lucy Robinson from TWright 111002.FTW]

"Lieutenant"

Twin

[NI0948] Twin Noah

[NI0950] Twin Jerusha

[NI0951] Twin Jemina

[NI0970] Was killed by fallen tree

[NI0972] "Esquire"
He was an officer in the Revolutionary War


Genealogy and Family Register of George Robinson, 1919

"Mr. George Robinson experienced religion at about the age of 20, and embraced principles that governed his conduct in future life. He was an affectionate husband and parent; in the government of his family, he was excellent, and in society, respected. He was an officer in the revolutionary war, and took a deep interest in the welfare of his country; he never had any thing to do in the law; he had few or no enemies, and departed this life in peace, Aug. 19, 1812, at the place of his nativity, aged 86."

http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tcwlmo&id=I01172

[NI0984] Title: SAR Patriot Index, 1999 Edition

[NI1025] Removed to Attleboro, MA before 1711 (before his father).
"Captain"
Attleboro representative in 1736, 1737, 1741-1743 and 1746

http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tcwlmo&id=I03649

[NI1027] Lived in what is now North Attleboro, MA on the East Bay Road (now Kelley Boulevard or Route 152). The approximate location was on the easterly side of Kelley Blvd., between the old intersection with Towne Street and the intersection with Bungay Road.

http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tcwlmo&id=I00424

[NI1052] "Reverand"
Graduated from Yale University in 1748
Presbyterian Clergyman in Smithtown, NY from 1751-1755.
President of Yale University 1766-1777
1779 aided in the defense of New Haven against the British and was captured. He was forced by repeated pricks of a bayonet to guide them. These injuries hastened his death.
He had 5 sons and 3 daughters.

Biographical Directory of the American Congress, 1774-1949
Biographies


Daggett, Naphtali
page 100
Daggett, David, senator, was born in Attleboro, Mass., Dec. 31, 1764; son of Thomas Daggett; grandson of Thomas Daggett; great-grandson of Deacon John Daggett; great great grandson of Thomas and Hannah (Mayhew) Daggett; and great great great grandson of John Daggett, who came from England with the Winthrop company in 1630 and settled at Watertown, Mass. He was graduated at Yale in 1783, was admitted to the bar in 1788, and practised law in New Haven, Conn. He was married to Wealthy Ann, daughter of Dr. Æneas Munson of New Haven and they had nineteen children. He was a representative in the state legislature, 1791-97, and 1805-09; speaker in 1794; state senator, 1797-1804 and 1809-13; state's attorney, 1811-13; mayor of New Haven in 1828; and a Federalist presidential elector in 1804, 1808 and 1812. He was a United States senator, 1813-19; associate judge of the superior court of the state, 1826-32, and chief justice of the supreme court. 1832-34, when he was retired He was an instructor in the New Haven law school, 1824-26, Kent professor of law in Yale college, 1826-48, and a fellow of the corporation of Yale, ex officio, 1809-13. He received from Yale the honorary degree of LL.D. in 1827. See his life by the Rev. Dr. Dutton (1851). He died in New Haven, Conn., April 12, 1851.

http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tcwlmo&id=I03243

[NI1056] Graduated from Yale University
"Lieutenant"

http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tcwlmo&id=I03675

[NI1059] Title: SAR Patriot Index, 1999 Edition

[NI1062] Doctor

http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tcwlmo&id=I21388

[NI1085] The name Blackinton was changed by some family lines to Blackington. This was especially true of the Benjamin Blackin[g]ton line that removed to Maine. For conformity I have input all of the Blackinton descendants with the exception of the Benjamin line with the Blackinton Spelling.

He owned two acres on the ten mile river in 1711 in Attleboro, MA.

http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tcwlmo&id=I00336

[NI1102] Arrived in America in 1674 and first settled in Barrington, ?RI

http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tcwlmo&id=I06212

[NI1103] Never married

[NI1104] Mother 51 yo at time of birth

Never married

[NI1105] Was one of the largest landowners in all of Worcester County, MA

http://awt.ancestry.com/cgi-bin/igm.cgi?op=GET&db=tcwlmo&id=I13611

[NI1109] Never married

[NI1112] Never married

[NI1149] Deacon

[NI1156] "Colonel"
Along with his brother Otis started the first button factory in the United States in 1812.

[NI1157] Along with his brother Obed started the first button factory in the United States in 1812.

Title: From the Record of Julett "Jay" (Mohr) Miller
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Apr 24, 2000

Special thanks to Juliett "Jay" (Mohr) Miller for information on the descendants of Otis Robinson.

[NI1201] Of Warren, RI

[NI1211] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

He was described as "of Providence" at the time of their wedding banns.

[NI1212] Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors in the War of the Revolution, 17 Vols.
Healey, Eliphaz, Attleborough. Corporal, Capt. Caleb Richardson's co., Col. Timothy Walker's regt.; muster roll dated Aug. 1, 1775; enlisted May 1, 1775; service, 3 mos. 8 days.

Healey, Resolved, Attleborough. Private, Capt. Jabez Ellis's (Attleborough) co. of Minute-men, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 6 days.
Healey, Resolved. List of men raised in Bristol Co., agreeable to resolve of Dec. 2, 1780, as attested by James Williams, Superintendent for said county, dated Taunton; also, list of men raised to serve in the Continental Army, returned as received by John Burt, at Taunton, April 18, 1781, to be conducted to Springfield and delivered to Col. Shepard; age, 28 yrs.; stature, 5 ft. 8 in.; complexion, dark; occupation, cordwainer; engaged for town of Attleborough; term, 3 years; also, Private, Capt. Ebenezer Smith's co., Lieut. Col. Calvin Smith's (6th) regt.; returns for wages; wages allowed said Healey from April 15, 1781, to Dec. 31, 1782, 20 mos. 15 days.


Healey, Benjamin. Private, 3d co.; order dated Oct. 28, 1783, for wages for May and 10 days in June [year not given], appearing in a register of orders accepted on account of wages; also, Corporal, 3d co.; order dated Oct. 28, 1783, for wages for 20 days in June, and the month of July [year not given], appearing in a register of orders accepted on account of wages.


Healy, Eliphaz, Attleborough. Private, Capt. Jabez Ellis's (Attleborough) co. of Minute-men, which marched on the alarm of April 19, 1775; service, 11 days; also, Corporal, Capt. Caleb Richardson's co., Col. Timothy Walker's regt.; company return dated Oct. 6, 1775; also, order for bounty coat or its equivalent in money dated Camp at Roxbury, Nov. 20, 1775.
Healy, Eliphaz. Private, Capt. Isaac Washburn's co. of guard;s enlisted March 11, 1781; discharged April 11, 1781; service, 1 mo.; company stationed at Thomaston, Lincoln Co.

[NI1230] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

The GenDex website lists his yob as 1775 -- which is obviously incorrect.

[NI1249] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to records of New York Marble Cem., vault no. 64 was bought by
Philo Judson in 1831. In addition to Bethia Healy, the following people are
also in the vault (all have the surname Judson; years in ( ) are when buried):
Sarah (1831), Mary Ann Caroline (1831), Nancy (1831), Philo (1832), William P. (1844), & Mary Ellicott (1851).

[NI1359] See William Healy folder in Healey Family Folder in Genealogy folder in My Documents

From notes of Teresa Haldorson:

1st wife - Grace Ives (says Calnek) daughter of Miles Ives ofWatertown, married in 1643. However, Bowen's History ofWoodstock concludes that Grace Ives and Grace Butterice, or Buttry(s)-see 3rd wife— appear to be one and the same person. Nico Buttry(s) aged 33, wife Martha, aged 28- born about 1606, and daughter Grace, age 1, sailed from Ye Port of London in ship James and arrived in Cambridge 7/13/1635. (Hotten's Original Lists of Persons of Quality (1600-1700). No further mention is made of the family until in 1654 Grace Butterice married William Healy. Miles Ives, whose wife's name was Martha, born about 1606, in his will dated 12/30/1683, mentioned his grandchildren Nathaniel and Martha Healy. The conclusion is drawn that Nicholas Butterice died, Martha married Miles Ibes about 1638, and her daughter Grace Butterice, became known as Grace Ives. Miles Ives and wife Martha had other children: Sarah b. 11/8/1639, Mary b. 10/5/1641, and Hannah b. 9/9/1643.

The record of the death of William Hele's first wife appears in the Roxbury Land and Church Records, page 174.

"1649 Month 9 day 8 (12/8/1649) Sister Heli died in childbed with other diseases which cause her child to die and was take from her by peeches."

Bown suggests that the first wife was probably a near relative or close friend of Elizabeth, the widow of John Morrick ofHingham, because in her will dated 5/7/1650 she bequeather "to William Healy of Roxbury." Elizabeth Moricke also willed "to my sister Grace Allam in Linckconeshire L5". This sister "Grace" obviously could not have been William Hele's first wife either.



...."In England (and the Colonies) the legal year began on Annunciation Day, which was March 25th. The change to January 1st took place in 1752. Hence the "27th of the 1st" would be March 27th, while the "2nd of the 1st" would be April 2nd, etc. Dates between January 1 and March 25 are sometimes written thus; Feb. 21,1574-5, which is 1575 according to present reckoning."

[NI1360] See William Healy folder in Healey Family Folder in Genealogy folder in My Documents

From notes of Teresa Haldorson:

2nd wife- Mary Rogers dau. of Rev. Nathaniel Robers of Roxbury, m. in 1650 (Col. Joseph L. Chandler's "Rogers' Pedigree" pub. in NEHG Reg. Vol. 41, p 165). They moved to Cambridge where wife died. Roxbury Church and Land Records, p. 175: "1651 month 9, day 29 (11/29/1651) The wife of Neighbor Hawley died." She died before her father, which would account for her not being mentioned in his will. Rev. Nathaniel Robers, b. in Haverhill, England in 1598, d. 7/3/1655, aged 57 years, was 2nd son of Rev. John Rogers, a district minister afterwards of Dedham, England, who was grandson of the Martyr John Rogers. Rev. Nathaniel Rogers was educated at Emanuel College, England, which he entered when about 14 years old. He married Margaret Crane of Coggshell or Coxhall, Essex; arrived in Boston 11/1636; was ordained pastor of the Church at Ipswich 2/20/1638; took Oath of Freedom 9/6/1683. His oldest son, John Rogers, was made President of Harvard College 8/12/1683 and d. 7/28/1684.

*****

from: http://fosterfamily.surnames.com/gedhtree/beckstrom/np22.htm#iin387

Note for: Mary Rogers, 8 Feb 1628 - 20 Oct 1718 Index
Christening:
Date: 8 Feb 1628
Place: Coggeshall, Essex, England

Birth Note: Source: Form submitted by a member of the LDS Church
Search performed using PAF Insight on 20 Mar 2005

Death Note: Source: Record submitted by a member of the LDS Church
Search performed using PAF Insight on 20 Mar 2005

[NI1361] http://www.bdhhfamily.com/william_healy_(older).htm

see notes under daughter Mary Rogers

Oath of Freedom 9/6/1683

[NI1363] [William Healy Ancestors.FTW]

FTM Family Archive CD 231 refers to FHC microfilm no. 0496864.[Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

FTM Family Archive CD 231 refers to FHC microfilm no. 0496864.

[NI1365] Note for: Sarah Brown, 29 Mar 1654 - BEF 1688 Index
Individual Note:
9/10/03 IGI shows Sarah Or Judith Cutting, and Susannah Noyes Of Newberry as her Mother.

[NI1366] Rev. John Rogers, a district minister afterwards of Dedham, England, who was grandson of the Martyr John Rogers.
from http://www.bdhhfamily.com/william_healy_(older).htm

[NI1368] John Rogers (January 11, 1630 – July 12, 1684) was an early American academic. He was educated at Harvard College graduating with a B.A. in 1649, and a M.A., 1652). A resident of Ipswich, Massachusetts, Rogers practiced medicine and assisted his brother-in-law William Hubbard in the ministry, despite neither having been ordained as a minister or trained as a physician. In 1682 he was appointed President of Harvard; but this position he held for only two years before suddenly dying at the age of 54. from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Rogers_(Harvard)



John Rogers, Harvard's sixth president served a mere 21 months, from 1682-1684, and died in office.

[NI1374] Adopted by Charles and Madeline McCoy Steeves 7/13/1927. The family moves to Boston where Mattie (by oral history) is murdered. Charles remarries and family moves to Maine when Margaret was young.

Margaret was not adopted but indentured by Steeves (see Scrapbook)

Stewardess for Northeast Airlines in early 1950's in Boston.

Illegimate child - parents living in West Palm Beach, Florida but moved to Macon, Georgia for delivery. Move back to WPB shortly after birth and indenture of Margaret to Steeves.

Davis Funeral Home, 22 Knox Street, Thomaston, Maine 04861

[NI1390] # ID: I11807
# Name: Mary Duncan 1 2
# Sex: F
# Birth: 1808 in Kentucky 1 2
# Death: 1 2
# Reference Number: MDNM5I
# Note:

[684427.ged]
SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P160
Date: 26 Sep 1850
Title: 1850 Census, Lafayette, Missouri
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P221
Date: Aug 1860
Title: 1860 Census, Jackson, Missouri
Author: U.S.Government
!1850 and 1860 Census. A Nancy Jane Duncan joined Lone Jac k church
on 7 May 1848.

Donna Haroldsen
Birth: 1808



Marriage 1 George Wilson Marquis b: 1807 in Kentucky

* Married: 29 MAR 1832 in Ray, Missouri 1 2
* Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: IGI

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P2
Title: Marriages Of Ray, Missouri

Children

1. Has No Children Joseph Duncan Marquis b: 1833 in Missouri
2. Has Children James Thomas Marquis b: 30 MAY 1835 in Missouri
3. Has Children George W Marquis b: 23 OCT 1840 in Missouri
4. Has No Children Martha S Marquis b: 1848 in Missouri
5. Has No Children Lucinda E Marquis b: 1851 in Missouri


Sources:

1. Title: 684427.ged
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 6, 2002
2. Title: wood.FTW
Repository:
Call Number:
Media: Other
Text: Date of Import: Mar 20, 2002

[NI1401] [William Healy Ancestors.FTW]

FTM Family Archive CD 231 refers to FHC microfilm nos. 0740994 & 95.[Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

FTM Family Archive CD 231 refers to FHC microfilm nos. 0740994 & 95.

[NI1405] from: http://fosterfamily.surnames.com/gedhtree/beckstrom/np22.htm#iin387

Note for: William Healy, 11 Jul 1652 - ABT 1698 Index
Individual Note:
BIOGRAPHY: William Healy-2, first son of William Healy-1 to reach maturity , was the second child of Mary Rogers, his father's second wife. She died, a few months after his birth. He was born at Roxbury, and was baptized there on the 11th day of the 5th month, 1652, - in other words, 11 July 1652. The church record of his baptism reads, "William Hely sonne to William Heli." After his father removed to Cambridge and became a member of the Cambridge church, Rev. Jonathan Mitchell entered in its records in 1658 the fact that the child William had been "Borne at Roxbury & baptized there." William Healy-2 grew up in Cambridge, and served as a soldier from that town in King Philip's War in 1676 [Capt. Hinchmans's Co.]. He had married Sarah Brown, daughter of James Brown, in 1674. He removed to Hampton soon afterwards, where he became involved in Gove's Rebellion in 1681. William Healy-2 is next found at Hampton, where it may be that he was employed by Edward Gove, as he blazes into brief prominence by his arrest and trial for high treason, for his part in the ill-starred episode known as "Gove's Rebellion." a full account of this affair follows as it is a story not readily available to the general reader, being considered too trivial for inclusion in most histories. For William Healy and his associates it was, however, a matter of the utmost seriousness. The Government in England had made a number of conflicting and questionable grants of territory in New Hampshire, and near the end of the year 1680 one of the grantees, Robert Mason, came over to obtain possession of the estate to which he believed he had a full and just
title. Although he was armed with a writ of mandamus from the king, the settlers disregarded his demands that they give up their freeholds and consider themselves as his lessees, and the local Council published an order forbidding his proceeding. Mason returned to England, convinced that the only way to obtain his rights would be to secure appointment of a new government in New Hampshire. By an agreement to divide the spoils with the rapacious king he was successful in arranging this, even to the extent of being allowed to make his own selection for the office of governor. He appointed one Edward Cranfield, "a man as unprincipled and greedy of gain as the king himself." Cranfield, armed with his governor's commission, arrived at Portsmouth 4 October 1682, and at once reorganized the governor's council. The Assembly met on 14 November; one of its members from Hampton was Edward Gove. The Assembly, hoping to detach Cranfield from Mason, tried to bribe him with a payment of 250 Pounds, and then, to their discomfiture, saw him pocket the bribe and at the same time order their assemblage dissolved. Edward Gove, a man of considerable property and somewhat popular, "a leading man and a great stickler in the late proceedings of the assembly", was naturally infuriated, and decided to take action. "Under resentment, caused by a free use of ardent spirits and by a want of rest", Gove started single-handed to redress his grievances, among which he enumerated "the governor, as vice-admiral, acted under the commission of his royal highness who was a papist, and would bring popery in among them; that the governor was a pretended governor and his commission signed in Scotland." Gove declared that "his sword was drawn, and he would not lay it down, till he knew who should hold the government." Cranfield sent warrants to the constables for Gove's arrent, and ordered the militia of the province to be in readiness. Gove eluded the constables, and "hastened to his party at Exeter, from which he suddenly returned with twelve men, mounted and armed with swords, pistols, and gune, - a trumpet sounding, and Gove with his sword drawn marching into Hampton at the head of them." Here they were all arrested, except the trumpeter, who, "forcing his way, escaped, after whom a hue and cry was sent out." The demonstration was made on January 27th, and was premature, for January 30th had been set as a day of public humiliation, and if Gove had waited for that day hemight have had some support. As it was, the prisoners were taken in irons to Portsmouth on a Saturday, examined on the Sunday, and were all committed to prison on an island in portsmouth harbor, where they were kept in irons on account of the dilapidated condition of the jail. The eleven prisoners, all charged with high treason, were brought before the authorities in Portsmouth on 5 February 1683. A grand jury found a true bill against nine of them, - Edward Gove, John Gove, William Healy of Hampton, John Wadleigh, Joseph Wadleigh, Robert Wadleigh, Thomas Rawlins, Mark Baker, and John Sleeper. A petit jury was then selected for their trial, and the nine were found guilty of high treason. That this was carrying matters to the ridiculous must have been apparent to Cranfield, for within a few days he issued pardons to all except Edward Gove, and set them at liberty. Gove, as the ringleader, was held, and was given the astounding sentence, "that he should be carried back to the place whence he came, and from thence be drawn to te place of execution, and there be hanged by the neck and cut down alive, and that his entrails be taken out and burned before his face, and his head cut off, and his body be divided into four quarters." The sentence was, however, not executed, - Gove was reprieved and was then sent to England, where he was held a prisoner in the Tower of London for three years. At the end of that time his complete insignificance induced the authorities to give him a full pardon, and he was permitted to return to his properties in New Hampshire. The original copy of William Healy's pardon is preserved in the Gerrish collection of manuscripts, and is a document of some historic interest, carrying as it does the signature of the notorious Governor Cranfield. As not every family history can boast of a member accused of and convicted of high treason, the compiler of these notes has considered it appropriate to transcribe the document in full: His first wife seems to have died within a few years, for in 1687 he is of record in Salisbury with a second wife, Mary, whose family name is unknown. After residing in Badford for a time, he removed his family to Boston. He seems to have died in Boston about 1697 or 1698. He is said to have been a blacksmith by trade.

[NI1407] from: http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~walkersj/Healy.htm

2. NATHANIEL2 HEALY (WILLIAM1) was born Abt. 16581 Christened: February 06, 1657/581, and died June 02, 1734 in Cambridge, Middlesex Co., Massachusetts1. He married REBECCA HAGAR July 14, 1681, daughter of WILLIAM HAGAR and MARY BEMIS. She was born October 29, 1661 of Roxbury, Massachusetts, and died January 06, 1733/34. They were charter members of the West Roxbury church and are buried in West Roxbury. He was made a Freeman in 1690. Nathaniel Hesly was a soldier of Capt. Nathan Davenport's Company in King Philip's Indian War, and was wounded in the Narragansett Fight December 19, 1675. He settled in Newton in 1688 at the age of 30 years, where he purchased of Jonathan Jackson, Sr., 26 1/2 acres of land near Watertown. The soldiers of the Narragansett Fight, or their heirs, were promised a gratuity of land besides their wages for driving the Indians out of the Narragansett area, but this promise was not carried out until many years later. The grant finally alloted the heirs of Nathaniel Healy, called Narragansett Grant No. 4, was in Chesterfield, Mass. and in 1764 his grandson Joshua 4 Healy, son of Joshua 3 of Dudley, took possession of the crown land granted to his grandfather.
Philip White and 6 of his neighbors became involved in a long standing controversy regarding their membership at the church in Newton. According to the town records, Philip and his neighbors complained that they lived four and a half to five miles from Newton meeting house and attending the church there was a hardship. In 1705 he and six neighbors (William Ward, Edward Ward, Nathaniel Healy, Daniel Colburn, Benjamin Wilson, and Elizabeth Bacon) petitioned the town to move the meeting house to a more central location because otherwise they chose to attend the Roxbury church since it was closer to them. Their petition was not accepted. Eight years later in 1713, the above neighbors with the exception of Benjamin Wilson, again petitioned to divide the town into two precincts so that another meeting house could be built closer to them. The outcome of this petition was that the Court saw no cause to divide the town nor to move the meeting house, but in recognition of the petitioners hardship, advised Newton to allow the petitioners to worship in Roxbury. Eleven years later, in 1722, Newton sued Philip White and his neighbors for refusing to support the Newton church, and incarcerated some of them. The petitioners again brought the issue before the Court. In December of that year, Newton petitioned the Court to have the six families come back to Newton because they had built a new meeting house much closer to them.
Nathaniel's will, made 5/4/1731, names his wife Rebecca; sons Ebenezer, John, and Joshua; daughters Rebecca Thwing, Abigail Brackett, Mary Mayo, Martha Baboock, Lydia Avery, Hannah Young, and the children of his deceased son Samuel. He appointed his sons Ebenezer and John executors. He was a wheelwright and his estate was inventoried at 1233# 4s 9d.

[NI1408] [William Healy Ancestors.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, because her mother died shortly after her birth, it is likely she was raised by the Ives Family.[Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, because her mother died shortly after her birth, it is likely she was raised by the Ives Family.

[NI1413] [William Healy Ancestors.FTW]

His last will & testament, dated 4-7-1557, is reported to have been "proved"
4-26-1557. (I suppose that means he died on or just before 4-26-1557.)

[NI1434] # ID: I11776
# Name: David Jones Marquis 1 2
# Sex: M
# Birth: 27 JUL 1812 in Kentucky 1 2
# Death: 23 AUG 1895 in Hillsboro, Jefferson, Missouri 1 2
# Burial: Hillsboro Cemetery, Hillsboro, Jefferson, Missouri
# Reference Number: MMRD5S
# Note:

[684427.ged]

1840 census lists a male and a female under 5. There is a M artha Page with him in 1870. Could be a granddaughter? Ca n not find him under any spelling in 1850 in Missouri index . His wife's obituary speaks of her husband as though he we re still alive so I infer he died after 1892.
CENSUS:
1840 Lafayette, MO p145 GSF#14856 David J Marquis (hard to read, index says David J) Manufact uring and
trades
1m 20-30 1f 20-30
1m under 5 1f under 5

1860 Miller, MO p441 GSF#803633 24July1860
David J Marquis 47 KY Methodist minister
Lucy A 46 VA
Robert A 18 MO

1870 Jefferson, MO p253 GSF#552282 16June1870
D.J. Marquis 58 KY Minister
Lucy Ann 57 VA
Robert W. 28 MO
Martha E Page 9 MO

MO Obits & Death Notices, 1851-1854
March 10, 1854 Martha Jane Marquis, youngest daughter of David L. and Luc y L. Marquis, died in St. Louis, Mar. 2, 1854, age 3 years , 3 months, 9 days. By John Penman, from St. Louis, Mar 18 54
There is a Marquis buried in Hillsboro Cemetery, Jefferson , Missouri in 1895. No other information was available.

Per Donna Haroldsen
StL AC MECS 1895:79
Memoir of David J. Marquis

Reverend David J. Marquis was born July 27th, 1812; died August 23rd 1895.
When the news of Bro. Marquis' death ws noised abroad, on many a heart there fell the shadow of grief, and unbidden, to many an eye there sprang a tear.
For upwards of forty years he had gone in and out before us. In South-East Missouri--where most of his days were spent since entering the ministry--where his converts were counted by thousands, and where his name is an ointment poured forth, the Church which owes so much to him will be slow indeed to forget his work of faith and labor of love.
He was a man of much faith and much prayer. Simple in his tastes, trustful in his nature, decoted to Christ and the Church, with a single eye and an undeviating purpose through the long years of itinerent service which he rendered to the Church, no man might call in question his integrity or doubt his piety.
Deeply religious, zealous for the glory of God, full of love to the weary, the wandering, the fallen, he spent his life in doing good.
In his lips was the law of kindness, in his heart no quile.
Those who knew him best, loved him most.
While unblessed with early educational advantages, he managed, by dint of hard study, to become well acquainted with the literature of the Church, well versed in its standards of doctrine, and gained more than an average knowledge of its polity.
The Bible was his constant companion, so much so that when his sight failed, he would recite his Scripture lessons--rarely making a mistake, so richly stored was his memory with treasures from the best of books. The same may be said of out humns, which he seemed to repeat with so much correctness, as to be a matter of surprise.
His preaching was textual, and in dealing with his subject he gave evidence of a knowledge of the deep things of God, obtained only by communion with him.
Practical in his presentation of the truth, he was forceful in pressing it upon the consciences of those who heard, and persuasive in his endeavor to lead them to the cross of Christ.
His sermons were well thought out, well arranged,m and proved that he used no unbeaten oil. While not what would be called a fine preacher, he was certainly useful and acceptable proclaiming, so that the common people heard him gladly; the Gospel of Christ as a present, full and free salvation. If preaching is to be measured by results, few among us can compare with him, for in his ministry of forty-three years, he claimed to have been instrumental in the conversion of four thousand souls! What a goodly multitude to greet him by the Crystal Sea!
Bro. Marquis, by reason of failing sight, became a Super annuate at the Conference of 1890. His other faculties seemed to hold out to the last. Had it not been for his vision, up to the date of his death, he might have been in the active work. He grew old gracefully. There was no trace of acidity, or shadow of gloom--all was sweetness and light. At Irondale (sic Washington co), where he spent his last days, "Uncle Marquis," as the people loved to call him, was universally respected and loved. To the last he retained his interest in the Church, and was wide awake to every avenue of usefulness. On the morning of his death, he visited a sick person, ministering words of comfort and consolation, thus carrying on his loved employ to the end.
In his wonted health, apparently, he buisied himself with caring for little matters about his home. While so engaged he sat down, and his wife found him dead.
Without a pang, his light went out--he ceased at once to labor and to live.
No mortal eye witnessed his passing over, but the eye that never sleeps was upon him, and the angels bore his spirit home. So lived, so died David J. Marquis.
In "the land that is fairer than day" we expect to greet him.
H. Hanesworth
Note:
(Research):Marquess, Amanda
Lived in: Polk Township, Adair County, Missouri
Series: T623 Microfilm: 836 Book: 1 Page: 176



Father: Robert Marquis b: 31 AUG 1785 in Pennsylvania
Mother: Levina Jones b: 30 NOV 1784 in Frederick, Virginia

Marriage 1 Lucy Ann Smith b: 24 JAN 1813 in Albemarle, Virginia

* Married: 15 AUG 1835 in Boone, Missouri 1 2
* Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

!Obituary of Lucy Ann Marquis.

Children

1. Has Children Anna L Marquis b: DEC 1839 in Washington
2. Has No Children Robert A Marquis b: 1842 in , , Missouri
3. Has No Children Martha Jane Marquis b: 23 NOV 1850


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[NI1435] # ID: I11816
# Name: Lucy Ann Smith 1 2
# Sex: F
# Birth: 24 JAN 1813 in Albemarle, Virginia 1 2
# Death: 13 JAN 1882 in Jefferson, Missouri 1 2
# Burial: Hillsburo Cemetery, Missouri 1 2
# Reference Number: MSML5I
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

OBITUARY:977.8 V48w Missouri obituaries, Vol 5, 8 Feb 1882 : Marquis, Lucy Ann, daughter of William and Ann Smith, wa s born in Albemarle, County Virginia, Jan 24, 1813. When qu ite young parents moved to Woodford County, Kentucky, wher e she spent her early years. Leaving them, she came to Boon e County, Missouri, and joined church at age 18. she was ma rried to DL Marquis August 15, 1835. They have lived in Lex ington, Booneville, and St Louis. Her husband is an itinera nt minister. Her last home was in Jefferson County. She die d January 13, 1882. Buried in Hillsboro Cemetery. Woodford County, Kentucky is in the North East corner a fe w counties in from the Border, near Lexington. Boone Count y Missouri is next to Howard and Cooper counties, where Rob ert Marquis was. Look in Boone, Howard, and Cooper for he r marriage to David. Lexington, MO is in Lafayette county . Booneville is in Cooper.



Marriage 1 David Jones Marquis b: 27 JUL 1812 in Kentucky

* Married: 15 AUG 1835 in Boone, Missouri 1 2
* Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

!Obituary of Lucy Ann Marquis.

Children

1. Has Children Anna L Marquis b: DEC 1839 in Washington
2. Has No Children Robert A Marquis b: 1842 in , , Missouri
3. Has No Children Martha Jane Marquis b: 23 NOV 1850


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[NI1436] # ID: I11771
# Name: Ruth Whitaker 1 2
# Sex: F
# Birth: 1820 in Ohio 1 2
# Death: BEF 1853 in Missouri 3
# Reference Number: MWHR5W
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Date: 28 Sep 1850
Title: 1850 Census, Lafayette, Missouri
Author: U.S. Government
!BIRTH: 1850 Census, Lafayette Co., MO, age 30 on 28 Sep 18 50,
Birthplace looks like Ohio. DEATH: Spouse remarried on 22 Mar 1853; A child was born i n 1851. Looked for other Whitakers around Lafayette in 1840 and 185 0 for possible father. In 1850 found Charles in Char, p186, Sahah ? in Bates, p263, Several in DeKalb including Samuel p419 from T N, previously from NC, and John F. Whittaker in Clay, p304, ag e 25 from VA. None are obvious fits. In 1830 there is a Samual Whitak er in Ray County, MO. In 1840 there are James and David Whitaker in C linton County pp44,45. David is 40-50, can't read James. There i s a Samuel Whiteaker in DeKalb, MO in 1850, p419. Wrong one. He is fro m TN then NC. There is a Benjamin Marquis in the 1880 Kansas census t hat is consistent with her first son. However, there is an Evalin e Unknown with him who is listed as his mother. She was 61, born in O hio.
Perhaps she is the mother-in-law?



Marriage 1 William S Marquis b: 1818 in Howard, Missouri

* Married: 6 FEB 1842 in Lafayette, Missouri 1 2 4
* Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P30
Date: 5 Mar 1842
Citation Comments: by William Parker. Title: Marriage Records Of Lafayette County Missouri 185 1-1865

Children

1. Has No Children Benjamin H. Marquis b: FEB 1842 in , Lafayette, Missouri
2. Has No Children Thomas J. Marquis b: 1845 in , Lafayette, Missouri
3. Has No Children John M. Marquis b: 1847 in , Lafayette, Missouri
4. Has No Children William H. Marquis b: 1849 in , Lafayette, Missouri
5. Has Children Sarah Jane Marquis b: 12 JAN 1851 in Lafayette, Missouri


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3. Title: Donna Haroldsen
4. Title: Christine E. Brodnax

[NI1437] # ID: I11777
# Name: Mary Martha Marquis 1 2
# Sex: F
# Birth: 1825 in Missouri 1 2
# Death: 6 DEC 1914 in Missouri 3
# Ancestral File #: MMRM5S
# Reference Number: 13066
# Note:

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P164
Date: 26 Sep 1850
Title: 1850 Census, Lafayette, Missouri
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: P825
Date: 15 Jul 1860
Title: 1860 Census Johnson, Missouri
!1850 Census, Lafayette Co. Mo. See notes on Robert Marquis . Marriage records of Lafayette Co, MO lists Mary M Marqui s and Hiram Weedin bk D pg162.[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

!The 1810 census lists a female under 10.



Father: Robert Marquis b: 31 AUG 1785 in Pennsylvania
Mother: Levina Jones b: 30 NOV 1784 in Frederick, Virginia

Marriage 1 Hiram Weeden b: 22 FEB 1808 in Tennessee

* Married: 7 MAR 1854 in Lafayette, Missouri 1 2
* Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: IGI

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Book D Pg162 Title: Marriage Records Of Lafayette County Missouri 185 1-1865

Children

1. Has Children Sarah Weeden b: 1855 in Missouri
2. Has No Children Luvina J Weeden b: 1858 in , , Missouri
3. Has No Children Frances Lavina Weeden b: 1858 in Missouri
4. Has No Children Lucy P Weeden b: 1863 in Missouri
5. Has No Children Emily Lucretia Weeden b: 1866 in Missouri


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3. Title: Donna Haroldsen

[NI1438] # ID: I11779
# Name: Hiram Weeden 1 2
# Sex: M
# Birth: 22 FEB 1808 in Tennessee 1 2
# Death: 23 JUL 1884 in Lafayette, Missouri 1 2
# Burial: Dover Cemetery, Lafayette, Missouri 1 2
# Reference Number: MWDH5I
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Inscription For Lafayette, Missouri

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Inscription For Lafayette, Missouri

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Pg30
Date: 11 Oct 1850
Title: 1850 Census Saline, Missouri
Author: U.S. Government

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Pg825 Jackson Twp.
Date: 15 Jul 1860
Title: 1860 Census Johnson, Missouri
!Listed on 1860 Census, Johnson Co, MO, p825, spelled Weedi n, age 53, born in TN, married to Mary M, age 35, 5 kids li sted that are too old to be hers, large break then two more ; On 1850 census, Saline Co, Mo, p30, age 40, born in MO, W ife Mary, age 35; 1850 Census also lists Henry I and Matthe w in Saline Co that could be siblings and Catherine that co uld be mother. 977.8453 V3b Inscription of LaFayette Co. MO , Vol 2 gives birth and death date. I can not find them i n 1870 in Missouri.
CENSUS: 1850 Saline, MO p30 GSF#443627 11 OCT 1850Hiram Weedon 4 0 MO
Mary 35 MO
Tollmon 14 MO m
Jane 13 MO f
John 12 MO m
Daniel 10 MO m
Artemisia 8 MO f
Nancy C 6 MO f
Adeline 4 MO f
Henrietta 2 MO f
1860 Johnson, MO p825 GSF#803626 15July1860 Jackson Twp
Hiram Weedin 53 TN
Mary M. 35 MO
H.D. 19 MO
Artemsea J 16 MO
Mary J 15 MO
Rachel A 13 MO
Henrietta E 12 MO
Sarah E 5 MO
Luvina I(J) 2 MO



Marriage 1 Spouse Unknown

* Married: 14 OCT 1830 in , Clay, Missouri 1 2

Children

1. Has Children Artemisia Weedon b: 1843 in Missouri
2. Has No Children Rachel Adeline Weedon b: 1846 in , , Missouri


Marriage 2 Mary Martha Marquis b: 1825 in Missouri

* Married: 7 MAR 1854 in Lafayette, Missouri 1 2
* Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: IGI

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Book D Pg162 Title: Marriage Records Of Lafayette County Missouri 185 1-1865

Children

1. Has Children Sarah Weeden b: 1855 in Missouri
2. Has No Children Luvina J Weeden b: 1858 in , , Missouri
3. Has No Children Frances Lavina Weeden b: 1858 in Missouri
4. Has No Children Lucy P Weeden b: 1863 in Missouri
5. Has No Children Emily Lucretia Weeden b: 1866 in Missouri


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[NI1439] # ID: I11813
# Name: Susannah Marquis 1 2
# Sex: F
# Death: in Y 1 2
# Reference Number: MMRS6S
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

!Listed on marriage records of Madison Co., KY. George Marq uis signed bond. From this I infer that she is Robert's sister . There is a George Boone, in Madison County in 1795 that my be her fa ther in law. Thomas Boone is not in Madison County in 1800 tax lis t or 1810 census. There is a Thomas in Clark County in 1810, p125 an d one in Logan County in 1800 and 1810. Letter from Betty Burgess do es not
list her as daughter.
CENSUS:
1810 Clark, KY p125
Thomas Boone
3m under10 1f under10
1m 16-26 1f 16-26



Father: George Marquis b: 18 SEP 1747 in Maryland
Mother: Mary Unknown b: BET 1765 AND 1784

Marriage 1 Thomas Boone

* Married: 16 NOV 1799 in , Madison, Kentucky 1 2
* Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Marriages Of Madison, Kentucky


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[NI1441] # ID: I11833
# Name: George Marquis 1 2
# Sex: M
# Death: ABT 1823 in , , Missouri 1 2
# Reference Number: 13126
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

!Letter from Betty Burgess lists him as son, but she has n o data. There is a young George Marquis in Jefferson, IN i n 1820, p288 between 16 and 25. The history of Lafayette Co unty, MO lists a George Marquis as the first school teache r in 1822. Says he died shortly thereafter. There is a marr iage for George Marquis and Sarah Woodfill in Jefferson IN . One index says 19 May 1816, another says 8 Dec 1916. Sara h Marquis joined the Lone Jack Church in Jackson, Aug 1860 . Could have been her or William's daughter who was 9 at th e time. Helen Harmon says the George in Jefferson, Indian a who married Sarah Woodfill was Samuel's son (see RIN 1555 ), hence a cousin of this George.



Father: George Marquis b: 18 SEP 1747 in Maryland
Mother: Mary Unknown b: BET 1765 AND 1784

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[NI1442] # ID: I11891
# Name: Rebecca Marquis 1 2
# Sex: F
# Birth: 1788 in Pennsylvania 1 2
# Death: 10 NOV 1823 in Jefferson, Indiana 1 2
# Reference Number: 13186
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

!Letter from Betty Burgess list her as daughter and gives information on death and marriage. Leter from Helen Harmo n lists her
birth year and state, marriage information, and death.



Father: George Marquis b: 18 SEP 1747 in Maryland
Mother: Mary Unknown b: BET 1765 AND 1784

Marriage 1 Samuel Maxwell b: 6 SEP 1777 in Virginia

* Married: 24 AUG 1820 in Jefferson, Indiana 1 2


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[NI1443] # ID: I11894
# Name: Samuel Maxwell 1 2
# Sex: M
# Birth: 6 SEP 1777 in Virginia 1 2
# Death: 27 APR 1837 in Jefferson, Indiana 1 2
# Burial: Hanover Cemetery, Hanover, Jefferson, Indiana
# Reference Number: 13189
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

!Samuel is a brother to John who married Eleanor, his siste r-in-law.
1820 Indiana Census 977.2 x2p 1820, Jefferson County, p 27 6A
Samuel Maxwell
4M<10
M 26-45
2F<10
2F 10-16
F 26-45




Per Donna Haroldsen
Father: Bazaleel MAXWELL b: 20 Dec 1751 in , Albemarle, Virginia
Mother: Margaret ANDERSON b: 4 Sep 1755 in , Albemarle, Virginia



Marriage 1 Rebecca Marquis b: 1788 in Pennsylvania

* Married: 24 AUG 1820 in Jefferson, Indiana 1 2


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[NI1444] # ID: I11892
# Name: Mary Marquis 1 2
# Sex: F
# Birth: 1789 in Pennsylvania 1 2
# Death: 1 2
# Reference Number: 13187
# Note:

[684427.ged]

!Letter from Betty Burgess lists her as daughter and gives marriage. Says they moved to Montgomery, IN. Her son received an
inheritance from her father. Nicknamed Polly. Letter from Helen Harmon gives her birth year and state and repeats marriage information.

1850 Montgomery County, IN Census GSF#442939 p398
Scott, Mary 61 PA
Wm. R. 36 IN farmer
James Wilson 29 IN farmer
George Marquis 29 IN farmer
Nearby (p399) in 1850 are James B Scott, 30 KYwith Mary E . 26 KY and children.
Susan Scott, 50 Ky with children. (p398) James B. McCollough 60 NC with Margaret 56,KY and ch ildren
Two Wilsons.



Father: George Marquis b: 18 SEP 1747 in Maryland
Mother: Mary Unknown b: BET 1765 AND 1784

Marriage 1 James Scott

* Married: 31 DEC 1812 in , Jefferson, Indiana 1 2

Children

1. Has No Children William R. Scott b: 1814 in Indiana
2. Has No Children James Wilson Scott b: 1821 in Indiana
3. Has No Children George Marquis Scott b: 1821 in Indiana


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[NI1445] # ID: I11895
# Name: James Scott 1 2
# Sex: M
# Death: AUG 1840 in Montgomery, Indiana 1 2
# Burial: Michael Cemetery, Union Twp, Montgomery, Indiana 1 2
# Reference Number: 13190

Marriage 1 Mary Marquis b: 1789 in Pennsylvania

* Married: 31 DEC 1812 in , Jefferson, Indiana 1 2

Children

1. Has No Children William R. Scott b: 1814 in Indiana
2. Has No Children James Wilson Scott b: 1821 in Indiana
3. Has No Children George Marquis Scott b: 1821 in Indiana


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[NI1446] # ID: I11893
# Name: Eleanor Marquis 1 2
# Sex: F
# Birth: 27 JUN 1801 1 2
# Death: 1821 in Indianapolis, Indiana 1 2
# Reference Number: 13188
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

!Letter from Betty Burgess lists her as daughter and give s birth,
death and marriage.



Father: George Marquis b: 18 SEP 1747 in Maryland
Mother: Mary Unknown b: BET 1765 AND 1784

Marriage 1 John Maxwell

* Married: 21 NOV 1819 in Jefferson, Indiana 1 2


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[NI1447] # ID: I11896
# Name: John Maxwell 1 2
# Sex: M
# Death: 1 2
# Reference Number: 13191
# Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

!John is a brother to Sam who married Rebecca, his sister-i n-law.
1820 Indiana Census 977.2 x2p 1820, Jefferson County, p 27 6A
John Maxwell
M<10
M 10-16
M 16-18
2M 18-25
M 26-45
F 26-45



Marriage 1 Eleanor Marquis b: 27 JUN 1801

* Married: 21 NOV 1819 in Jefferson, Indiana 1 2


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[NI1455] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

His US Army serial no. is 2034768; he enlisted 3-28-1918, was a member of Co. L, 102 Infantry, 26th Division, A.E.F., & was discharged 4-29-1919. He was a private, & participated in the St. Mihiel & Argonne Forest drives. He is described as 5' 10.5", dark complexion, brown eyes, & black hair. On March 1, 1920, he lived at 104 Raeburn Ct., Pontiac, Mich. John L. Middleditch, age 46, & Elmer Secord, age 30, of Lum, were sworn witnesses as to his identity on William's application for certificate in lieu of a lost discharge certificate. Elmer swears he has known William for a period of 10 years.

In recognition of his service in WWI, there is an American Legion symbol on his gravemarker.

[NI1456] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

She had a tenth grade education in Lum. To temporarily teach in those days, a person had only to take the State Teacher's Exam. She first wrote the 3rd grade exam, which entitled her to teach for one year in a one-room, rural school. Her 2nd year, she wrote the 2nd grade exam, & wrote on more subjects, which entitled her to teach for 3 more years. At the end of the 4th year, she re-took the exam, which permitted 3 more years of teaching. In total, she taught in Lum, MI for 6 years.

After marrying William, they lived on a farm in Burnside Twp., Lapeer Co. She sold their farm there in 1931, the same year he died, then moved to Lum, where her parents had moved after selling their farm in 1917.

After marrying Elmer, they moved the next August 29th (her mother's birthday) to a farm on Willis Rd. in Burnside Twp., 1 mile north of where Hazel had grown up. Hazel taught at the Willis School for the 1943/44 school year. (The next year, Eloise taught at the same school.) Upon selling this farm, Hazel & Elmer moved to Oxford, MI in 1947, where Arnold had a job with the gravel pit operation.

She suddenly announced one day in her twilight years that she'd decided that paved roads were a good thing.

According to the 1900 federal census, all four of her grandparents were born in Ireland.

[NI1460] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Power shovel operator at American Aggregates. Free Methodist.

[NI1466] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Apple computer enthusiast, introduced Thom Danicki to them.

[NI1468] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Former farmer; was a finish carpenter most of his career, working on new, custom houses. Was in the US Army marching band, 1945-46; has played the tuba in the
Dixie Cats dixieland band for many years.

[NI1470] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to his funeral memorial card, Arnold is the father of 4 children, including Renee & Marjorie.

TO DO: Inquire about the 2 daughters.

[NI1474] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

William, Priscilla, & their children moved from Ont. to Mich. in May, 1885. He was a farmer & banker at Lum.

According to the 1900 federal census, he was born 8/1854, owned his farm free & clear, & both parents were born in Ireland; he had become naturalized.

According to his gravemarker, he was born in 1850.

He worked for a man on a farm in Canada, then bought 88 acres of land from Mr. Stevens, a lumber man, which were 2.5 miles west of Lum, in Arcadia Twp., Lapeer Co.. He cleared 60 acres of pine trees, then built a house there.

According to notes of Eloise Boat, there was another child in the family who died one year before Hazel was born.

[NI1475] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to the 1900 federal census, she was born in 8/1854, & both her parents were born in Ireland.

According to her gravemarker (per Lapeer Co. Cemetery Index), her middle initial was A.

[NI1476] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Her 2 daughters died in childhood.

[NI1479] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

He was listed in the 1900 federal census as Harvey Reid, born 12/1883.

[NI1480] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

She was listed in the 1900 federal census as Terresa.

According to the Lapeer Co. Cem. Index, her gravemarker states she died in 1969.

[NI1481] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Farmer, carpenter, foundry worker, & Pontiac Motors employee. His son Dale, is from a previous marriage.

According to his US Army discharge document, 7-3-1919, he had brown eyes, black hair, & a dark complexion. He was 28 years, 10 months old when he was drafted, 11-18, 1917. Serial no. 2032186, Wagoner Co., 310th, 602nd Provisional Regiment of Engineers, a unit of the 85th Division, V Army Corps. He participated in the St. Mihiel & Argonne Meuse offensives.

[NI1504] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Lum Cemetery (f/k/a DeGroat Cem.) is on Lum Rd., west of the village.

[NI1506] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to the Lapeer Co. Cem. Index, his gravemarker states he died in 1961. It is my calculated guess that Claude & Eldon are the younger brothers of Vern, due to the proximity of their graves & dates of birth.

[NI1509] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

He was in USAF in WWII-Europe. Moved to LA after retiring (42 years).

Death date: Jul 1985

[NI1538] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Worked for a printing firm in Chillicothe, Ohio. Upon retirement, he moved back to Ponchatoula, LA. There, he & daughter Carol own & operate
Triple-R-Printing. He was also the publisher of "The Enterprise" - a weekly paper.

[NI1543] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Born in Harper Hospital.

[NI1587] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to e-mail dated 9-17-99 from Tom A. Hipp, "From my great grandmothers notes Excerpt: "Uncle Ebon and Blanche were there at the 50th wedding anniversary of uncle Doss - brother of John Henry.""

According to e-mail dated 9-26-99, he "spent the last half of his life in Bayham Twp., Elgin Co."

[NI1589] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

At the time of his marriage to Sarah Anderson, he moved to Granville, Annapolis Co., which is across Annapolis Basin from the town of Annapolis Royal. He was a prominent man here until his death.

[NI1590] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

A conflicting account of Isaac William's wives & children (GenDex site with submitters e-mail address of: mb@thewheelers.com) holds that Amelia did not die until 1875, after which Isaac married Elizabeth Crisp.

[NI1592] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

He was a member of the 1879 Annapolis County Council.

[NI1628] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

No children.

[NI1633] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

1881 census records disclose that she was a Methodist while everyone else in the family was Anglican. Perhaps her conversion was connected with her future husband?

[NI1643] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Moved to Nova Scotia Colony in 1762.

[NI1666] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, he died before marrying.

[NI1668] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, she died before marrying.

[NI1692] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

In his will, he provided that the 2 children of his late son Oliver, Comfort & Elizabeth Haley, jointly receive the portion of his estate which would have been their father's.

[NI1695] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

He & his family moved to Digby Co. about 1830, settling on the Sissibou River, about 1/2 mile from its lower falls.

[NI1698] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Soon after their marriage, they moved on to Springford, Oxford Co., Upper Canada Colony (now Ont.), British Empire.

[NI1704] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

The family farm was sold by his estate after John's death in 1882 to Judson W. Monk. Son Freemont was the estate representative; sons Charles, George, & Francis signed releases (per _Springford History..._, p. 85.

[NI1706] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, he died before marrying.

[NI1714] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, she died before having children.

[NI1718] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Never had any children, according to Col. Haley's book.

[NI1721] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, he died before marrying.

[NI1967] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Information at Annapolis Co. (NS) GenWeb site, cemetery listings, lists her middle initial as J.. This is
inconsistent with the Col. Haley's book reference to her middle name as Ann.

[NI1980] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

He departed Yarmouth, Nova Scotia Colony 11-22-1849 on the "Mary Jane" expedition.

[NI1989] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

GenDex website shows the following info. about her & her husband (which is inconsistent with the info. already listed in this file):
"Rebecca", d/o Eliphaz Healy, b 2-18-1755 in Attleboro, m 18 Jan 1776, Boston, Suffolk, MA , d 30 May 1813, Thomaston, Knox, ME (no source listed).

[NI1996] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Col. Haley points out that his gravestone indicates he died in his 33rd year, but concludes this is in error.

[NI2000] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, his children & their descendants settled in New Hampshire, Vermont, New York, & Maine.

[NI2001] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Col. Haley states "the existence of this child is doubtful." on p. 55 of his book.

[NI2017] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Never married, according to Col. Haley's book.

[NI2031] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

"OCCUPATION: M. LUCY DUNN" (??? this is listed at the GenDex site).

[NI2042] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

FTM Online User Home Page for Christine-R-Fretwell reflects his middle name as
Harris & his dob as October 18, 1870 (which is inconsistent with his dod of
August 08, 1870 I already had).

[NI2053] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Had a farm at Mount Hanley, later w/ youngest daughter Ruth, he moved to St. John, New Brunswick for a few years, then returned to the farm, where he died. His wife died there as well.

One of the GenDex site relationship files states that [a] wife of "Joshua Upham
Slocomb" was Virginia ??. No other info. is provided...

[NI2081] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

"Listed in Slocum Genealogy as just 'Elizabeth B. 30-Oct-1835', NOT 1836."

[NI2083] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

"[He is] buried in the Fairlawn Section of the cem., next to his wife. There are 4 graves in the lot, 7-10. "

[NI2084] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

She is also buried in the Fairlawn Section of the cem., next to her husband. There are 4 graves in the lot, 7-10.

[NI2133] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

The GenDex site actually states her date of birth to be 1-20-1780 -- which obviously can't be correct insofar as her father died in 1852.

[NI2134] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

It's not clear to me from the following wording of the FTM On-line p. 50 whether her 4 children were with her first or second husbands (I've used her 2nd husband):

"ESTHER MESS, b. Jan. 16, 1832; m. Edmund B. Willie; 2nd, Nathaniel Hunt of Waldoboro. She d. Sept. 10, 1858. They had children: Octavia, Selden Dunton7, Statira and Owen Robins7."

[NI2177] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Sailed the "AMETHYST" built in Boston in 1822, also sailed the "NORTHERN LIGHT ". He is the Joshua Slocomb who single-handedly circumnavigated the globe.

According to Arthur Ransome "Although he apologised for his "hand, alas, that has grasped the sextant more often than the plane or pen," he was clearly as gifted a writer as he was a shipwright and navigator, being able, in direct and vigorous prose, to convey a vivid and poetic picture of the voyage with its many dangers and delights, and also of himself, with his modesty, his enormous capacity for enjoyment, and his sense of humour (there is something particularly attractive, not to say
Goonlike, about a Great Navigator who on discovering and naming an island, leaves on it the notice 'Please Keep Off the Grass'!).

Captain Slocum continued to sail the "Spray" after the completion of the journey described in this book, and in 1909 at the age of 65 set out once again on a long single-handed voyage, making for the Orinoco River and the headwaters of the Amazon. He never arrived, his family supposing that he must have been run down by a large steamer during the night. "

[NI2204] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died in infancy, per FTM On-line page 1428_49.html "Woodcock Genealogy".

[NI2214] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

At time of death was 81yrs., 1m., + 2dys.

According to Col. Haley's book, he owned considerable property in Dudley. In his old age, he turned his homestead over to his eldest son, Nathaniel, after which he & his 2nd wife, Abigail, resided with him. Major Healy was the owner of Violet, the last African slave in Dudley. Violet often told the story of her being kidnapped in her childhood, while she & a brother were at a distance from their home driving away the monkeys from the rice fields, which the monkeys infested.

[NI2345] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

"Late in Dec. 1808, the schooner 'Seaflower', ... bound from Halifax for Yarmouth,
...was found a wreck, on Mud Island, with all hands lost [Capt. Haley was her master]. Mud Island is in the open Atlantic, about 20 miles due south of Chebogue."

[NI2349] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Among the vessels he owned were the "Olive Branch", 37 tons, & "Hannah", 54 tons. Claims against his estate were published in the Yarmouth Telegraph & were dated 8-15-1831. Named administrators were his son-in-law, Henry Hilton, & his widow, Martha.

[NI2351] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

He remained closely associated with his father during the latter's life. He was named as 1 of 2 executors of his father's estate, & as a guardian of his younger siblings. He was also a trustee for the interests of his widowed mother.

He was also a partner with his brother Jeremiah in the operation of certain ships.

[NI2357] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

He also was a member of the ill-fated "Zone" expedition to Calif., dying as the ship neared Calif..

[NI2383] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, she died before marrying.

[NI2384] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, he died before marrying.

[NI2385] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, she died before marrying.

[NI2386] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, he died before marrying.

[NI2404] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, she & Jason had 8 children. No further details are provided.

[NI2408] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, he was the uncle of Hannah's first husband, Amasa.

[NI2427] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, she never had any children.

[NI2451] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, he never married.

[NI2458] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, through his six sons, the Healy name was spread through various towns in N. Hamp., Vermont, & NY, & a line from his daughter Hannah can be traced in N. Carolina.

[NI2470] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Never married.

[NI2478] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, they had 3 sons & 7 daughters (he provides no further details).

[NI2493] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, they had 2 sons & 3 daughters born to them at Southern Pines, NC.

[NI2540] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, she & Harvey had 7 children. No further details are provided.

[NI2542] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, she & Benjamin had 6 children. No further details are provided.

[NI2544] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, she & George had 8 children. No further details are provided.

[NI2546] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Col. Haley's book, he & Zeruiah had 9 children, but the author could find references to only 6 among the Dudley Records (perhaps the other 3 were born elsewhere?).

[NI2580] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

She is the granddaughter of Major Nathaniel Healy with whom his slave Violet lived in her elderly years.

[NI2583] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Col. Haley points out that they had children, but provides no details.

[NI2587] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Col. Haley indicates they had 5 children, but provides no details.

[NI2617] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

"Unlike most of the men of his family, Comfort did not engage in seafaring occupations, but became quite noted as a farmer/agriculturalist. With his own means, & probably some land inheritance of his wife from the Robbins family properties, he became owner of a large farming tract at Salem.

Part of [his farm] is now utilized as the Yarmouth Airport. [The fields...] still under cultivation as farming land appear to be the best in the region."

[NI2635] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

He was mate of the "Zone" expedition to Calif., which departed Yarmouth on 12-18-1849. The entire crew contracted yellow fever at Rio de Janeiro. Henry died the day after leaving that port. The master of the ship was Capt. George W. Bond, who survived the disease & went on to become an Alameda Co., Calif. pioneer.

[NI2646] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died single.

[NI2647] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died unmarried.

[NI2648] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died in infancy.

[NI2655] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Never married.

[NI2662] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died unmarried.

[NI2663] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

"[He] was not only a noted master of sailing vessels, but became master of the first steam passenger ship to ply between Yarmouth & Boston."

[NI2667] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died unmarried.

[NI2668] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

He went abroad, after which all trace of him was lost.

[NI2683] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

He was a member of the "Mary Jane" expedition to Calif., Nov. 1849, along with Ebenezer Haley. Upon arrival there, he mined for a time at Long Bar on the Yuba River, but by 1853, he had become a settler at Centerville, Calif.. He established & operated the first blacksmith & wood-working shop of the county.

[NI2689] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

She died unmarried.

[NI2690] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died unmarried.

[NI2696] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died in infancy.

[NI2699] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died unmarried.

[NI2702] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died unmarried.

[NI2704] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died unmarried.

[NI2707] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died unmarried.

[NI2712] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died "young".

[NI2730] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died unmarried.

[NI2808] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died unmarried.

[NI2809] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

There is an inconsistency in Col. Haley's book (p. 148) regarding her age/date of death: 9-22-1927, age 78. On the given date, she would only have been age 76 years.

[NI2811] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

There is an inconsistency in Col. Haley's book regarding his age/date of death:
12-14-1933, age 81. On that date, he would have only been age 80.

[NI2827] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Died in "early childhood".

[NI2828] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

She died just "a few" years after their marriage.

[NI2874] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

He died "in infancy".

[NI2956] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Thomas A. Hipp, the descendants of she & John Henry live throughout the southern & NE lower peninsula of Mich..

[NI3365] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

They had no children, according to Eloise Boat.

[NI3394] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Thomas Hipp, she & her father attended the 50th wedding anniversary party of her uncle, Dawson D. Healy + Permelia nee Ford, in Ontario in 1925. Her mother may have passed away before this, as she is not mentioned.

[NI3401] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Never married, according to Eloise Boat.

[NI3487] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

The newlyweds received the south 100 acres of Concession 7, lot 24, S. Norwich Twp. as wedding presents from their parents (40 acres from Alfred's & 60 acres from Emma's) -- per the _Springford
Tweedsmuir History..._, pp. 91-92.

[NI3869] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Jim Pool, she died at age 16.

[NI4586] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

I interpret the reference to the Knight surname to mean she was adopted by the Healys.

[NF0003] by Rev P Allen

[NF0009] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Book 8, P81
Title: Marriages Of Greenwood, Kansas
Call #: 978.1913 V28h
Repository Name: Family History Library
Address: Salt Lake City, Utah

[NF0032] No children - personal record Margaret S Wood p10 - possession of William R. Wood, Jr.

[NF0033] No children - personal record Margaret S Wood p10 - possession of William R. Wood, Jr.

[NF0067] by Rev Meservey

[NF0068] by Rev Pliney Allen

[NF0069] by Dr. Wilson Methodist
Attendent Edgecomb Webb
no children

[NF0086] 4 or 5 sons

[NF0092] 5 children p15

[NF0111] No children

[NF0112] 4 children

[NF0132] 2nd cousins

[NF0135] Lived in Windmills, Finland

[NF0146] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Vol. 2 Pg11
Title: Marriage Records Of Jackson County Missouri 1851-1865

[NF0148] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: IGI

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Marriages Of Madison, Kentucky

!The IGI list the marriage as 14 Sep 1806 to Savanah Jones.

[NF0150] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Pg161
Title: Marriages Of Jefferson, Indiana

[NF0166] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

Marriage License #28237, Hidalgo County, TX

[NF0167] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: #17140
Citation Comments: She was from Springhill, Johnson County, Kansas. Record includes
application for license, the license, and confirmation of marriage.
Title: Marriage License, Jackson, Missouri
Author: Jackson County, Missouri Recorder
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

SOURCE CITATION:
Page: Record 18, P446
Date: 23 Nov 1904
Citation Comments: Oliver T. Marquis married Eva M. Marquis, both of Rosedale, Kansas
on 23 Nov. 1904.
Title: Marriage Record, Wyandotte, Kansas
Author: Wyandotte, Kansas Probate Judge
Repository Name: Donna Haroldsen
Address: 1251 Sprague St
Manteca. CA 95336
Phone: 209-823-0215

SOURCE CITATION:
Date: 16 Jun 1900
Citation Comments: Says they were married 2 years.
Title: 1900 Census, Wyandotte, Kansas
Author: U.S. Government

[NF0175] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!She was not listed with him on 1910 census, but was on 1920.

[NF0182] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!From index to Ripley, IN marriages through 1850 taken from the www.
Ellen Gayle Layton says 10 Oct, 1832.

[NF0183] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

!From Ellen Gayle Layton

[NF0223] [Roy Lee Marquis.FTW]

License from Liberty County, Texas March 12, 1973 License No. 154, Vol. Z, page 246

[NF0353] My father found this in records at Rockland Public Library 4/11/00

[NF0368] Records obtained from The First Congregational Church in North Attleboro, MA

[NF0452] Of Wrentham, MA at the time of her marriage.

[NF0457] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

The FTM Family Archive CD 231 refers to FHC microfilm no. 1987017.

[NF0518] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to the 1964 book by James B. Haley, the 5-17-1720 date was that of
the INTENTION to marry, not that of the actual marriage. FTM CD 231 refers to
FHC microfilm no. 0562559.

[NF0520] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

The FTM Family Archive CD 231 refers to FHC microfilm no. 0496864.

[NF0523] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

They were married by Mr. Cotton Mather.

[NF0531] Marriage 1 Susannah Marquis

* Married: 16 NOV 1799 in , Madison, Kentucky 1 2
* Note:

[wood.FTW]

[684427.ged]

SOURCE CITATION:
Title: Marriages Of Madison, Kentucky

[NF0539] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

Witnesses were Levi Young & Elizabeth Burkholder. Minister was M. H. Bartram, M. E. (methodist-episcopal?). Both William & Percilla lived in Malahide Twp., Elgin Co., Ont. at the time of their marriage.

[NF0610] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

They were second cousins.

[NF0744] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

The FTM Family Archives CD 231 refers to FHC microfilm no. 0562559.

[NF0967] [Wm Healey Descendent.FTW]

According to Steve Riddle, Dolly was noted to be nearly 15 years older than Jesse.

[NS32991] Miss Lucy's father, William A. Farnsworth, was born in Waidoboro- about 1815, the son of Capt. William and Mary Farnsworth, and the grandson of Col. William and Elizabeth (Rutherford) Farnsworth. Her mother, Mary, was the daughter of William and Catherine Sprague, also of Waldoboro.
Born in 1839, Lucy was the second of six children: Josephine F., born about 1837; James R., born about 1841; William, born in 1849 (he died seven years later); Fannie F., born about 1853; and Joseph, who was born in 1857 and was to die at six years old.
Their father died in 1876, when Lucy was 37 years old, and her mother died in 1910, at over 90 years of age.
Mr. Farnsworth had accumulated a large fortune, both from his lime business (the company shipped over 900,000 barrels of lime in the 1860's) and as owner and president of the Rockland Water Company (afterwards taken over by the Camden-Rockland Water Company). This had come into being in 1850, just a month after Rockland changed its name from East Thomaston, having separated from its parent town of Thomaston two years before.
As she outlived all her family, Lucy Farnsworth's fortune had been further increased upon the death of her younger brother James and her two sisters, Mrs. Josephine M. Rollins and Fannie, who had died in the 1880's.
It was known that Miss Lucy dearly loved her father and had accompanied him to inspect his quarries and kilns, or to board the clippers which carried his lime to New York or New Orleans, and this experience combined with a natural, mathematical ability to form a business acumen unusual in women of her time. Miss Farnsworth often acted as her own lawyer where necessary, and her shrewd investment of the composite family fortune which rested in her hands was managed admirably, even though quantities of bank notes were found in the Homestead after her death.
On October 15, 1935, Lucy. Farnsworth was found in her bedroom, her death (according to Dr. H. J. Weisman, then county medical examiner) "

[NS24791] www.familytreemaker.com/users/f/a/l/John-Morrill-Falla/COL182-0109.html

[NS29021] Found online 20080216

[NS37311] Social Security Administration, Social Security Death Index, Master File, : Social Security Administration

[NS37313] www.ancestry.com

[NS25161] Handwritten - no primary source documentation

[NS25163] William R. Wood, Jr.

[NS16993] Ancestry.com

[NS21191] Search of City by Bill Wood - telephone call to me 3/27/00

[NS25371] State of Florida, Florida Death Index, 1877-1998, Florida: Florida Department of Health, Office of Vital Records, 1998

[NS25373] www.ancestry.com

[NS21271] Certified copy in papers of Margaret S. Wood

[NS21331] Handwritten entries

[NS17291] 1870

[NS17293] www.ancestry.com

[NS29753] www.ancestry.com

[NS17401] United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Tenth Census of the United States, 1880, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1880

[NS17403] www.ancestry.com

[NS25812] Good

[NS25813] Burpee Funeral Home Rockland, Maine

[NS17611] From Roy Lee Marquis.FTW, Date of Import: Feb 2, 2000

[NS34121] see text in notes of Orville T. Wood

[NS17681] United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Twelfth Census of the United States, 1900, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1900

[NS17683] www.ancestry.com

[NS34161] from Donna Haroldsen

[NS34221] from Donna Haroldsen

[NS21891] Indexed Vado Atlanta, GA Oct 5 1953
Acknowledged Oct 5 1953 2005-3BAA
Coded 2 Oct 16 1953 ATL DIST. OFF

[NS21892] Good

[NS26031] Descendent of Isabel Kirkpatrick who has extensively researched descendents of John J. and Elizabeth Cairns Kirkpatrick. (508) 877-3380 eMail joniliz1@aol.com
133 Winch Street, Framingham, MA 01701-3737

[NS26033] Framingham, Massachusetts

[NS30153] Jim

[NS30201] Oral history

[NS38461] United States, Selective Service System, World War I Selective Service System Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration

[NS38463] www.ancestry.com

[NS21991] Photocopy of cemetary records

[NS21993] Rockland, Maine

[NS34383] www.ancestry.com

[NS38611] United States, Selective Service System, Selective Service Registration Cards, World War II: Fourth Registration, National Archives and Records Administration Branch locations: National Archives and Records Administration Region Branches

[NS38613] www.ancestry.com

[NS18051] From Roy Lee Marquis.FTW, Date of Import: Feb 2, 2000

[NS18052] Primary

[NS18121] United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1910

[NS18123] www.ancestry.com

[NS26421] Dear Mr. Wood
Enclosed is a photo of grave marker we found at Hamilton Methodist Cemetary in Neptune, N.J. as per our conversation.

[NS26423] Asbury Park, New Jersey

[NS30573] Donna Haroldsen, 1251 Sprague Street, Manteca, CA 95336, (209) 823 0215

[NS26543] Robbins Cemetary, West Meadow Road, Rockland, Maine

[NS18331] From Roy Lee Marquis.FTW, Date of Import: Feb 2, 2000

[NS22491] This was a "cold" call to J Goodrich that I found on WWW search for Goodrich in New Jersey on phone.whowhere.lycos.com/telephone in January 2000. I mailed him a letter in January that he did not recall.
He indicated that Gladys Havens Goodrich was his mother and that Sarah Synder was his grandmother.
He did not recall his grandmother Gladys or great aunt Emma Synder.
He stated that his mother Gladys Havens Goodrich died about 25 years ago at age 78.
He also was unaware of any in his family with an interest in genealogy.
He also states that family did live in 37 Pine Tree Way in past which is next door to his home but since sold and re-modeled.

[NS22493] 35 Pine Tree Way, Belmar, NJ 07719-2846

[NS18401] United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Fourteenth Census of the United States, 1920, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1920

[NS18403] www.ancestry.com

[NS30771] Dear. Mr. Wood

Enclosed is a photo of grave marker we found at Hamilton Methodist Cemetary in Neptune, N. J. as per our conversation.

Robert J. Flood
628 Hill Drive
Buck, N. J. 08724

[NS39051] These two went through every Courier Gazette from 1846 to 1891 and recorded every birth, marriage (by groom and bride) and death

[NS22861] Connecticut Department of Health, Connecticut Death Index, 1949-2001, Hartford, CT, USA: Connecticut Department of Health

[NS22863] www.ancestry.com

[NS39391] Obtained copy from files of Margaret S. Wood. Copy dated 10/26/1987. See scrapbook of Emma Synder for copy.

[NS39392] Good

[NS39393] Circuit Court, County of Palm Beach County, Florida

[NS18821] United States of America, Bureau of the Census, Fifteenth Census of the United States, 1930, Washington, D.C.: National Archives and Records Administration, 1930

[NS18823] www.ancestry.com

[NS18993] Rockland, Maine

[NS35501] Rockland, Belfast, camden & Thomaston Directory for 1868

[NS35503] Special Collection Folger Library University of Maine

[NS35581] The Rockland, Belfast, Camden Directory

[NS35583] Special Collection Folger Library University of Maine

[NS35651] Containg a List of the Residents, Business Firms, Institutions, Societies, Etc., Etc.

[NS35653] Bangor Public Library

[NS19251] STATE OF GEORGIA - County of Bibb

THIS INDENTURE Made and entered into, this 13th day of July 1927 between Roy Marquis & Emma Marquis the Father & Mother of Margaret Marquis and Charles Steeves & Mrs. Mattie Steeves (2925 Houston Ave.) all of said State and County, WITNESSETH:

That the said Roy Marquis & Emma Marquis hereby binds and apprentices to the said Charles Steeves & Mrs. Mattie Steeves the said Margaret Marquis age 2 Weeks until the said Margaret Marquis shall becorne twenty-one years of age, upon the following terms:

The said Charles Steeves & Mrs. Mattie Steeves agrees to take into their custody the said Margaret Marquis

to teach her the business of Teacher & Musician furnish her with protection, wholesome food, suitable clothing, necessary medicine and medical attention; to teach her habits of industry, honesty and morality; to cause her to be taught to read and write the English language, and to govern her with humanity, using only that degree of force to compel her obedience as a father would use with his minor child, and when the said Margaret Marquis shall arrive at the age of twenty-one years shall, she shall receive from the said Charles Steeves & Mrs. Mattie Steeves Five Hundred Dollars, in consideration of all of which the said Charles Steeves & Mrs. Mattie Steeves is to be entitled to the services and earnings of said Margaret Marquis until she is twenty-one years of age.

WITNESS our hands and seals, this 13th day of July 1927

Signed, sealed and delivered in the presence of

Mrs. S.R. Wiley Roy Marquis

Walter C. Stevens Emma Synder Marquis
Ordinary, Bibb County, Georgia
Mattie Steeves
Charles Steeves

[NS19252] Primary

[NS19253] Bibb County, Georgia

[NS23511] obtained 4/4/2000

[NS23512] handwritten

[NS23513] Maine State Archives, LMA Building, State House Station 84, Augusta, Maine

[NS35901] Containing a List of the Residents, Business Firms, Institutions, Societies, Etc., Etc.

[NS35903] Bangor Public Library

[NS31763] Thomaston, Maine Town Office (Joan Linscott) (207) 354 6107

[NS36003] Bangor Public Library

[NS36063] Special Collection Folger Library University of Maine

[NS27831] From their first explorations, AD 1605; with family genealogies

[NS27833] Folger Library Special Collections & Personal Collection

[NS23762] Handwritten

[NS23763] Maine State Archives, LMA Building, State House Station 84, Augusta, Maine 04333

[NS36133] Special Collection Folger Library University of Maine

[NS36211] from information found by William R Wood, Sr.

[NS23861] Informant: Mrs. Wood

[NS23862] Good

[NS23863] Office of Vital Records, State House Station 11, Augusta, Maine 04333

[NS36263] Bangor Public Library

[NS23962] Good

[NS23963] State Registrar, Office of Vital Statistics, State of Florida

[NS36331] Grand Army of the Republic Comprehensive Information on Rockland's Civil War Veterans

[NS36333] Special Collection Folger Library University of Maine

[NS24032] Handwritten - good

[NS24033] Office of Vital Records, State House Station 84, Augusta, Maine 04333

[NS28171] Information obtain by Wm Wood, Sr March 2000. Handwritten document in possession of WWood, Jr.

[NS24121] Informant William R Wood, Jr.

[NS24342] Good

[NS24343] Office of Vital Records, State House Station 11, Augusta, Maine 04333

[NS32781] MISS EMMA SYNDER
Miss Emma Synder, 83, of 410 Spencer Dr., West Palm Beach, died Friday.
Survivors include two nieces, Mrs. Gladys Goodrich and Mrs. Emma Havens, both of Belmar, N. J.
Interment will take place in Neptune, N.J. with the Franoloni and Lopez Funeral Home in charge.
Friends may call from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. today at the Northwood Funeral Home.

[NS32783] obtained from files of Margaret S. Wood


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